Posts tagged with "Killefer Flammang Architects":

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SRHT plans 100 supportive housing units in L.A.’s Industrial District

Skid Row Housing Trust (SRHT) and Killefer Flammang Architects (KFA) have unveiled plans for a 100-unit supportive housing complex in Los Angeles’s Industrial District neighborhood, home to the city’s Skid Row. The 100 units will be divided between two structures located on the same block. A larger, signature structure featuring white stucco massing, canted walls, and panel-clad protrusions is to be located at 519 E. 7th Street and will provide 81 new units for the neighborhood. A smaller, 19-unit building currently owned and operated by SRHT located at 647 S. San Pedro Street will be rehabilitated as part of the project, as well.   A recent report filed with the Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council contains renderings depicting only the larger structure at the corner of 7th and San Pedro Streets, which features punched window openings, and appears to be organized around a central courtyard overlooked by exterior circulation. The corner complex contains a differentiated ground floor that will contain offices, supportive services, as well as a community room and laundry facilities. The ground floor mass will contain a rooftop terrace above a portion of the office areas. The structure’s massing and ornamentation suggest a somewhat more traditional Los Angeles apartment typologies, somewhat of a departure from SRHT’s more formally-aggressive projects from recent years. SRHT, a veteran non-profit housing developer, is currently quite busy building a bevy of new projects. The organization debuted two striking developments last year alone—The Six, a much-lauded 51-unit development by Brooks+Scarpa and the Crest Apartments by Michael Maltzan Architects, a more recently completed 64-unit complex in the San Fernando Valley. KFA and SRHT have worked together previously, most recently in 2015. That year, the team completed renovations on the New Pershing Apartments, a 69-unit Single Room Occupancy (SRO) residence contained within Downtown Los Angeles’s only remaining Victorian era structure.
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KFA and Leong Leong-designed LGBT center approved by Los Angeles City Planning Commission

This week, the Los Angeles City Planning Commission voted to unanimously approve plans for the Killefer Flammang Architects (KFA) and Leong Leong—designed Los Angeles LGBT Center (LALGBTC), Anita May Rosenstein Campus in Hollywood. The new healthcare and housing campus will include 100 units of affordable housing for seniors, 100 beds for homeless youth, new senior and youth centers, and up to 35 units of permanent supportive housing for young people. The mixed-use complex will also contain ground floor retail spaces. The project aims to expand the footprint and offerings of an adjacent complex, The Village at Ed Gould Plaza, which contains movie theaters, art galleries, offices, and meeting spaces. According to the only officially-released rendering for the project, the new and old facilities will be connected via interior and exterior courtyards and plazas, with the new building located at the corner of the block. The new three-story structure is composed as a series of stacked and curved curtain wall-clad volumes with the third floor extending beyond the perimeter of the lower levels along one side. The structure also features large, circular, and semi-transparent cut-outs that span multiple floors along these facades. In a press release for the project, KFA Principal and co-founder Barbara Flammang celebrated the commission’s unanimous approval, stating “We are delighted and excited that the Planning Commission recognizes the tremendous importance of the Center’s new campus,” she added, “KFA is proud to be helping increase the number of affordable housing units in a city that greatly needs them.” Because LGBT-identifying young adults make up a large portion of the overall homeless youth population, the project aims to fill a crucial void in services for members of that community in Los Angeles. LALGBTC CEO Lorri L. Jean told KPCC radio, “The new complex aims to help the two most vulnerable parts of our community, young people, and seniors who might face discrimination in other care facilities. Demand has skyrocketed in recent years and the need for affordable housing is particularly dire. The Center and our new campus are part of the solution to the growing problem of homelessness in our city.” For more information on LALGBTC’s services, see the center’s website.
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Killefer Flammang Architects and MGA Entertainment team up for 24-acre mixed use campus in the San Fernando Valley

Bratz Doll manufacturer MGA Entertainment and Santa Monica—based Killefer Flammang Architects (KFA) are breaking ground today on a new 24-acre mixed use campus headquarters for the toy- and electronics-maker in the Chatsworth neighborhood of the San Fernando Valley. Dubbed "24" by Uncommon, the real estate company developing the project, the design calls for the adaptive reuse and expansion of an existing industrial structure. (Formerly, it was a Los Angeles Times printing facility.) The developers aim to create approximately 255,000 square feet of office space in the reused building. MGA will move its headquarters from nearby Van Nuys to the new facility and will concentrate development of its wares on-site. KFA’s master plan for 24 features several mixed-use housing blocks containing 660 apartments on land that is currently being used for parking. The apartments will be located above storefronts, with the complex also containing urban amenities like gym facilities, a pair of swimming pool areas, and a park for recreational sports. The complex will also contain a pre-school, community garden areas, and an amphitheater. Regarding the expansion, chief executive of MGA recently told the Los Angeles Times, “The new facility will be a state-of-the-art facility for people to create and work and live and play.” A rendering released by the developers shows the reused printing facility located at the center of the site surrounded by multiple clusters of five- to seven-story apartment courtyard blocks. Surrounding city streets flow into and out of the complex, with internal pedestrian areas generally separated from automobile traffic. The project, which will also feature a transit plaza that will connect to the nearby Orange Line bus rapid transit line and Chatsworth Metrolink commuter rail station, is bounded on its southern edge by a creek that feeds into the Los Angeles river. The project comes as sections of the low-rise industrial and suburban western San Fernando Valley begin to densify and coalesce around new pedestrian-oriented urban centers. Another recently-announced development includes the Westfield Promenade 2035 by Westfield Corporation, Johnson Fain, Togawa Smith Martin Architects, and HKS Architects. 24 will be built in phases with the adaptive reuse component coming by 2018 and the housing component gradually phased-in between 2018 and 2022.