Posts tagged with "Keenan Riley Architects":

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Miami’s crazy Museum Garage is finally complete and set to open

Following over two years of planning and construction, the Miami Design District is opening the long-awaited Museum Garage. The eclectic complex is located just two blocks from IwamatoScott’s City View Garage, another high design parking facility in the multi-acre retail and cultural neighborhood. The garage’s animated, wildly varied facades are designed by five architecture and design firms: WORKac, J. Mayer H., Clavel Arquitectos, Nicolas Buffe and Keenan/Riley. Located on the northern border of the Miami Design District, the 800-car-capacity Museum Garage is seven stories tall, rising from a ground floor entirely devoted to retail. Terence Riley, of Keenan/Riley, led the concept of the ambitious project, which drew from Exquisite Corpse, a surrealist parlor game that entails the collaging of images by different authors independent of each other's designs. In the spirit of the game, each firm designed an individual and radically different facade as disparate and unconnected pieces, creating a multifaceted tapestry for the utilitarian structure. Emphasizing the cultural purposes of Museum Garage and the Miami Design District as a whole, each facade is titled as a standalone curatorial work. Ant Farm, WORKac’s contribution to the project, is inspired by the maze-like layout of an ant colony, replete with circulation corridors that are obscured by a perforated metal screen. The bends and folds of the elevation are habitable spaces, public spheres provided with shade and protection from Miami's subtropical environment. J. Mayer. H, a Berlin-based firm, designed XOX (Hugs and Kisses), which is composed of large puzzle pieces adorned with stripes and bright colors. Nicolas Buffe’s contribution, Serious Play, features a diverse range of 2-D and 3-D details formed from plastic and laser-cut metals. Buffe mixes historicist elements such as 23-foot-tall caryatids with cartoonish graphics. Urban Jam by Spanish-firm Clavel Arquitectos is dominated by forty-five gold and silver car bodies that cling to the elevation. Stacked atop each other, the cars are made to resemble a vertical traffic jam. Keenan/Riley’s Barricades draws upon common orange and white traffic barriers to create a brightly colored screen wall that is studded with fifteen windows framed with stainless steel. British firm Speirs + Major designed custom lighting for each façade, highlighting diverse architectural elements across the graduated and uneven elevations.
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An Instagrammers-Eye-View of Art Basel Miami Beach 2012

(Editor's Note: FXFOWLE Architect’s PR head, Karen Bookatz, offers a brief, Instagrammed account of architecture and design highlights at Art Basel Miami Beach 2012.) Don’t get me wrong: I love art and I love attending art fairs. They provide one a unique opportunity to see what’s fresh and new in the art and design industries—or whatever trade is being rep’d—every few months. For me, however, a booth is a booth is a booth. Art fairs must continue to find new ways of further distinguishing themselves or otherwise run the risk of conventionality. What Frieze did last May with SO-IL’s tent design (and to a lesser extent, Bade Stageberg and Cox’s environmental design effort for The Armory Show 2012) was a major step in the right direction. Likewise, custom installations and collaborative efforts, while public relations/marketing ventures more than anything else, have proven to be undeniably effective in creating buzz and increasing visibility for the respective firm, artist, or collaborative. (This is why I was personally so adamant about my own firm’s presence—with an architectural installation/lounge project at the Miami Project art fair—at this year’s Basel.) Untitled Art Fair | Keenan/Riley Architects The example of Frieze was most certainly a source of inspiration behind the new Untitled Art Fair, the tent of which was designed by Keenan/Riley Architects . I had the chance to chat up the founder of Untitled over sunset cocktails on Friday evening. I asked if he was considering commissioning a new tent designer for subsequent years—an RFP, or a call for proposals, perhaps? Unfortunately, this did not seem like his intention, but I nevertheless applauded his efforts. And the location of the fair—right off 5th and Ocean Drive on the beach—was off the chain. Guiro | Absolut Art Bureau Perfectly situated on the beach (between the W Hotel and the The Setai), Guiro, Absolut Art Bureau’s glowing, egg-shaped installation that—quite literally—secreted vodka for nine hours every evening, all in view of top-notch curated art and music programming, is exactly what the doctor ordered. I can’t wait to see what Absolut Art Bureau has in store for us next year. Drift | Snarkitecture There’s not much else to report on this crowd-pleasing, Louise Bourgeois-inspired installation other than restating the obvious: it was awesome and there should have been/should be more installations like it. Miami Art Museum Construction Tour | Herzog & De Meuron A first for me at—what is, now, my fourth—Art Basel: a construction site tour. I spent a beautiful Saturday morning on an intimate site tour of Herzog & de Meuron’s new project for the Miami Art Museum—which is slated to open at Basel 2013—led by Jacques Herzog, in the flesh, along with MAM director Thom Collins. Perfect structure, perfect site….perfect everything.