Posts tagged with "Kartell":

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Specsheet> Whimsical children’s furniture

From child-sized designer furniture to customized outdoor seating, this jamboree of unique children’s furnishings puts play at the forefront of design. Bunky by Marc Newson Magis Bunky’s design combines fun, privacy, and safety to create an environment where kids can have a space of their own and, obviously, sleep. Made from rotational-molded polyethylene, it is assembled from just four pieces and is available as a children’s single bed. All surfaces are smooth with no sharp edges, and the material is highly durable and easy to clean. Standard Sway Stool by Daniel Michalik kinder MODERN Balancing motion with function, this stool is made from a single block of recycled cork. A special pattern is cut into all four sides, causing the seat to rock and pivot under the weight of body movement. Sitting actively improves the sitter’s posture by the act of maintaining balance. Lou Lou Ghost and Tip Top by Philippe Starck Kartell Philippe Starck’s iconic Louis Ghost Chair and TipTip side table were made into their respective child-sized versions. Just like Louis, the Lou Lou Ghost is made of durable polycarbonate, making it scratch-resistant, stackable, and easy to clean. Meanwhile, the TipTip kid’s round top has a single base that combines a colored top with a hollow transparent leg. Together, they can be used both indoors and outdoors. K desk RaFa-kids This kid’s desk resembles the letter K when seen from the side. The design features rounded corners and a lid that opens to reveal an interior tabletop. The K desk can be used for working or hiding little treasures in the underside of a lid that doubles as a place to pin drawings or photos.   Downtown by Oiva Toikka Magis Magis imagined a square shelving unit that features five setback tiers, a pointed top roof, and legs. Along the sides, recessed squares mimic the shape of windows. The skyscraper-shaped form is molded in polyethylene, making it suitable for both outdoor and indoor use. Adada Rocking Horse Fermob USA Fermob makes the Adada Rocking Horse out of the aluminum leftover from producing other furniture. It has a lightweight frame outfitted with plastic pads on the base to let children rock away indoors or out without scratching the floor.
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Product> Clean Lines: Six Sleek Bathroom Fixtures and Fittings

In the residential bathroom, "transitional" style—an admittedly ambiguous label, but one that has nonetheless persisted in the industry—has lately and happily edged closer to contemporary. The shift is certainly attributable to design trends found in the hip hospitality sector. Here's a selection of items that are new to the market. Sunstruck Tub Kohler With a 17-inch bathing well, wide deck, and integrated lumbar support, this oval soaking tub offers comfort and easy access. The center-drain, 66-by-36-inch acrylic fixture is available with straight or fluted shroud. Diva California Faucets Offered in 30 finishes, the sinuous design is made of solid brass. The collection includes high- and low-profile faucets, as well as a full complement of tub fittings. Made in California. Kartell by Laufen Laufen Pairing transparent polycarbonate accents with ultra-thin ceramicware and fittings, this collaborative bath collection is available in six colors. Pléo Wall-Mount Toilet Kallista Offered in Stucco White or Linen, this sleek toilet has 1.6 GPF/1.0 GPF dual-flush capability. WaterSense certified. Hydrati Shower Brizo Secured with a magnet, the hand shower docks into the traditional showerhead, extending the functionality of the fitting without breaking into the wall. 2.5 GPM; available in four models in a variety of finishes. Arris Tub Filler Moen  Proprietary mounting plates resist wobble after installation. Available in chrome and brushed nickel. ADA compliant.
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Product> From Pawson to Libeskind, Quick Picks from Milan Design Week

AN editors swept and tweeted through the exhibit halls of the venerable Salone del Mobile last week, as well as the myriad satellite design events, exhibits, and installations that popped up around Milan. Footsore but aesthetically satiated, the AN team has reassembled stateside to share some of the best finds from the fair. Casamania Color Fall A lacquered, digital print enlivens the interior of the shelves, which are constructed of humble MDF. Designed by Garth Roberts. Cassina 9 Tables Marble base in black or white, with tops of aluminum, marble, or painted mirror glass. Designed by Piero Lissoni. Cappellini Lotus De Luxe Available with or without castors and/or arms, this chair is suitable for residential and office use. Wooden frame with molded polyurethane cushions covered in fabric or leather. Designed by Jasper Morrison. Viccarbe Trestle Solid oak legs are topped by padded or smooth upholstery. Seating modules are 60 inches in length; up to three benches can be seamlessly joined together. Designed by John Pawson. Cristalplant Slide Towel Shelf A polished aluminum loop slides up or down to both hold and hang bath towels. Designed by Cory Grosser. Poliform Web Bookcase Fabricated of Dupont Corian, this shelving unit is as much sculpture as it is storage. Designed by Daniel Libeskind. Kartell Uncle Jim Demonstrating the current limits of injected polycarbonate fabrication, this single-piece chair comes in four transparent colors. Designed by Philippe Starck.
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Savior of the Meat Market

When talking to Florent Morellet, don't call it the Meatpacking District. For the eponymous owner of now-closed diner/bistro Florent on Little West 12th Street, it's the Meat Market. Well before SoHo House and long before Pastis, there was Florent, the subject of a new documentary by David Segal, Florent: Queen of the Meat Market. I found out about the New York opening of the film while showroom hopping on Green Street last week. At Kartell, the perfectly bouffant-ed Darinka Chase encouraged me to try out Philippe Starck's Magic Hole. Before slinging chic plastic, Chase spent twenty years as hostess at the downtown den of dining debauchery. She vividly recalls how preservationists met at the restaurant in an effort to preserve the district. "At the time people did think it was kind of nuts, like landmarking the city dump," she said. The eatery was always a hub for a lot of left-leaning causes, acting as a gathering place for gay activists, AIDS activists, fringe artists, and, much later, for preservationists.  When the neighborhood took a turn toward high fashion, the area's characteristic metal awnings started coming down. The film devotes a good bit of time on how Morellet helped mobilize the community and suggests that, in many ways, Florent became a victim of its own success. After obtaining landmark status, the neighborhood became more desirable, the rent skyrocketed and the restaurant was forced to close. During a question and answer session following the film I asked Morellet, who now sits on Manhattan Community Board 2, what he thought about the High Line and the influx of contemporary architecture to the area. Citing the Ennead designed Standard Hotel and SHoP's Porter House as great architecture in "conversation" with the neighborhood, he said that without it the Meat Market would look like an industrial neighborhood in any other city. As for being booted out by the high cost, he said "change is good" and that the city needed a strong center. "You have to remember when I came to New York the outer boroughs were burning," he said. As for those still mourning the loss of the grittiness, he chalked it up to "white, middle class nostalgia." He seemed assured that Williamsburg was having a good go of it, though nothing like Meat Market, which was the perfect storm of location, timing and people. Though he allowed that a cheap, centrally located spot like it might one day become available again... provided we "have a really good depression."  
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Veni, Vici Furniture

Chef Mario Batali stopped by a group of diners at a press event today at Eataly to say that everyone who came into the new high-end Italian-theme eating court is ‘Italian.” But he was actually right, as sprinkled among the journalists sat the upper ranks of the Italian furniture industry all come to New York to announce one of those commercial-turned-cultural events that only the Italians can pull off without seeming crass. “I Saloni Milano in New York” wants to be for furniture what Fashion’s Night Out is for fashion. On November 29, some 20 Italian showrooms throughout New York will throw open their doors to “pay homage to the quality, innovation and beauty for which Italian design has long been known.” But that’s not the half of it. Programs in multiple venues will run for six weeks thereafter until January 8, 2011. Robert Wilson, master of theatrical event, will be at Center 548 in Chelsea to debut “Perchance to Dream: Videoportrait and Design Landscape,” a commissioned piece featuring ballet star Roberto Bolle. An ardent Italophile, Wilson is currently designing seven plastic chairs for Kartell, one for each decade of his life, and will also be selecting contemporary Italian-made furnishings to fill the gallery space as accompaniment to the videoportrait. When asked about his preferred style, he said, “I am interested in counterpoint. And you?” But that’s not all. Over at the Park Avenue Armory on December 3, artist-filmmaker Peter Greenway will be showing his multimedia spectacle of Leonardo da Vinci’s Last Supper that debuted in Milan in 2008. Here he will be upstaging himself with a replica of the dining set of the painting inside a full-scale mock-up of the nearly 4,000-square-foot apse and cupola of the Refectory of Santa Maria delle Grazie inside the drill hall. If that weren’t sweet enough, we hear that the panettone and caffe will be flowing everywhere throughout the holidays to inaugurate the 50th anniversary of the Milan Furniture Fair.
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Say Goodbye to Your Gnome

What better way to usher out the profligate design culture of the Bush era than to have these Alien Gnome Bandits escort your Philippe Starck Gnome thingee back where it belongs--into the past. Utah artist Fred Conlon, who sculpts the bandits out of recycled metal, claims they are just the thing for your “helpless, hapless” and useless garden gnome.
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Not Exactly Glass Slippers…

Reminiscent of the ever-so-popular jelly shoes of the 1980s, and more recent incarnations such as Marc Jacobs Rubber Ballet Flat Shoes which debuted in 2007, Italian furniture powerhouse Kartell, internationally renowned for modern furniture design in plastics, and young Italian fashion label .normaluisa recently released a shoe collection of plastic ballerina flats aptly called “Glue Cinderella.” Combining Kartell’s innovative technology with .normaluisa’s youthful design sensibility their latest collaboration offers classic style with an edgy vibe. In a statement released about the new partnership, Lorenza Luti, the company’s 30-year-old marketing and retail manager and mind behind the project said, “Kartell is not merely a design company, but an authentic lifestyle brand. It has been the leading brand in experimentation with plastics for sixty years and has made transparency its trademark. Consequently, when I started to think about a range of shoes, it was natural to give the product our imprint.” Giving the shoe its imprint is just what Kartell did. Made from an injection-molding technology that allows for the creation of two-tone shoes combining transparent and opaque materials, the shoe is available in a variety of shades including neutral beige, deep blue, white, red, violet, green, and crystalline. For $135, you can slip into a pair of your own. The sticky slippers are on sale now at Kartell flagship stores and select boutiques in New York City and throughout the world.