Posts tagged with "Kansas State University":

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2017 Best of Design Awards for Student Work

2017 Best of Design Award for Student Work: Preston Outdoor Education Station Designer: el dorado School: Kansas State University, College of Architecture, Planning, and Design Location: Elmdale, Kansas YMCA’s Camp Wood called on Kansas State University’s fifth-year architecture studio to design and build an outdoor education station on its property within the Tallgrass Prairie, North America’s most endangered landscape. Two requirements were given: The project must survive annual prairie burns, and the work must dissolve elegantly into the landscape. What began as a simple shade structure evolved into a flexible, programmable, and experiential backdrop for intimately connecting campers to the immediate landscape. Each station, designed and built by students, engages the environment and locally sourced materials to focus on essential elements of the prairie: insects, wind, stone, grass, and sky. The stations are connected by a pathway that extends from a 300-linear-foot dry-stacked limestone wall. "This is an elegant pavilion, and an impressive scale for a group of students. The detailing is well-executed." —Matt Shaw, senior editor, The Architect's Newspaper (juror) Camp Wood Director and Client: Ken Wold Stone Mason: Luke Koch, Koch Construction Specialties Concrete: Rick Mitchell, Mitchell-Markowitz Construction Contractor: Jay Scott, Scott Construction Machine Shop: R-TECH Tool and Machine   Honorable Mention Project: Waldo Duplex Designer: el dorado School: Kansas State University, College of Architecture, Planning, and Design Location: Kansas City, Missouri Designed by a group of fifth-year architecture students from Kansas State University, this project addressed the needs of a historic neighborhood with a severe housing-cost burden. At 725 square feet per unit, efficiency allowed for high-quality finishes, custom cabinetry, and a generous quality of light and social space despite a budget of $290,000 ($200 per square foot). Honorable Mention Project: Big Vic and the Blue Furret Designer: Rajah Bose School: California College of the Arts Location: San Francisco, California Bic Vic and the Blue Furret imagines what would happen if the architects of San Francisco’s Victorian period mashed together their kit of parts. Recognizable elements—like the turret and mansard cupola—combine to spawn a new sort of creature.
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Kansas State University students design affordable duplex with architecture firm el dorado

The Design+Make Studio is a capstone design studio at Kansas State University that works in collaboration with Kansas City-based el dorado inc. The focus of this year’s studio is to design an affordable duplex in the Waldo area in Kansas City. The research-based studio involves graduate students addressing community needs using design as a way of problem-solving. In past years the studio has built numerous pavilions and gathering spaces around Kansas City and has worked with clients ranging from the Girl Scouts to government agencies. The current duplex project, however, will be by far the most ambitious. 7509 Pennsylvania was commissioned by Botwin Commercial Development, who will eventually build the project. Through working with Botwin, under the guidance of el dorado, the students are getting direct experience working with clients, budgets, and timelines. “The duplex is built to fulfill a need,” said David Alpert, partner at Botwin Commercial Development. “In Kansas City, rent is increasing at a rate that is 56 percent higher than the national average. There are many people who work in Waldo, but can’t afford to live in Waldo. This duplex project is designed to accommodate families and individuals who want quality housing at a price they can afford. Lease price will be set based on income levels.” The duplex itself utilizes a modest footprint while maintaining high-quality materials. Each unit will have two bedrooms and one bath, within a total of 730 square feet of living space. The reduced footprint allowed for more attention and resources to go into design elements such as landscaping, lighting, water runoff, and an improved spatial quality. “There were three goals of this project,” said David Dowell, el dorado principal and Design+Make instructor in a press release. “First, create quality housing people can afford in Waldo and second, ensure the project is truly adaptable. By accomplishing goals one and two, we can replicate the concept into different build sites and plans can flex to meet each developer and tenant’s needs. To further encourage replication, every stage of design and construction will be open-source.”