Posts tagged with "Joseph Grima":

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Joseph Grima appointed as creative director of Design Academy Eindhoven

The founder of Italian studio Space Caviar, Joseph Grima, has been appointed as the creative director of Design Academy Eindhoven (DAE) as well as chair of the academy's executive board. Grima will begin his tenure starting from September 1 of this year. He will be in charge of the academy's curriculum and will work alongside Jurriënne Ossewold, a current board member who is director of education, research, and organization. DAE is funded by the Dutch government and is provided a yearly budget of $11.4 million. The job requirements listed by DAE noted that "a sense of humor [...] comes in handy," going on to add that "ultimately, all this is about the future of our students. No less." Grima, who is 40, will take the place of Thomas Widdershoven, who stepped down from the post in 2016. In addition to founding and running Space Caviar, Grima is also director of the New Museum Ideas City festival in New York. In 2015 he co-curated the inaugural Chicago Architecture Biennial with Sarah Herda. “Despite the extraordinary proliferation of design schools in recent years, there is still an acute shortage of places that actually question what design is," said Grima in a press release. "Design Academy Eindhoven isn’t a school where students simply learn design—they design design, and each day rethink the parameters through which it shapes society. I look forward to working with the Academy’s exceptional staff to help them build a place in which the future is born.” Gitta Luiten, chair of the Supervisory Board, commented on Grima's appointment: “We looked for someone with an international perspective on design and a heartfelt interest in education. Joseph Grima fits those criteria: his views on design and society and his international experience will benefit the students and the Academy,” she said.
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IDEAS CITY announces 41 fellows and public programing

IDEAS CITY has announced the names of 41 International Fellows to participate in an Intensive Studio Laboratory Program during the April 25-30 event in Detroit. Selected from over 800 applicants, the Fellows will work in the Herman Kiefer Complex—a former hospital complex in Virginia Park. The five-day charrette will culminate in a day long public program of presentations and talks. The Fellows are made up of emerging practitioners who are working at the intersection of community activism, art, design, and technology. Director of IDEAS CITY Joseph Grima stated in a press release, “IDEAS CITY Detroit will gather forty-one extraordinary individuals to tackle specific challenges facing the city. We’re incredibly excited to have the opportunity to learn from Detroit, to deploy a collective intelligence model based on arts and culture, and to further exchange with the community. The city is in the process of reinventing itself and, once again, is on the verge of transforming our understanding of the modern metropolis. Detroit is a laboratory for a new paradigm of urbanity.” The Fellows named are Joe Ahearn, Taylor Renee Aldridge, Ava Ansari, Hallie Applebaum, Leonardo Aranda, Nick Axel, Merve Bedir, Francesca Berardi, Beverly Chou, Carolyn Concepcion, Gabriela Córdoba, Afaina de Jong, Pınar Demirdağ, Fataah Dihaan, Shaida Ghomashchi, Jon Gray, Kunal Gupta, Tommy Haddock, Jason Hilgefort, Ekene Ijeoma, Tamara Jafar, Stacy’e Jones, Toms Kokins, Cindy Lin, Monty Luke, Daanish Masood, Tiff Massey, Jose R. Mejia, Cara Michell, Marsha Music, Ryan Myers-Johnson, Claire Nowak-Boyd, Evelina Ozola, Paolo Patelli, Margarita Pournara, Jay Rayford, Unai Reglero, Alethea Rockwell, Ruhi Shamim,  Giuditta Vendrame, and Nikolas Ventourakis. The April 30 public event will include the Fellows as well as talks by New York Magazine writer Rembert Browne, Chicago artist Theaster Gates, City of Chicago’s Department of Cultural Affairs  Commissioner Michelle T. Boone, architect Walter Hood, and artist/architect Amanda Williams, and more. The event will be held at the Jam Handy, a former film studio for car commercials located at 2900 East Grand Boulevard. IDEAS CITY is an international initiative to promote arts and culture as vital parts of healthy future cities. It was co-founded by Lisa Phillips, Toby Devan Lewis Director, and Karen Wong, Deputy Director, the New Museum, and is directed by Joseph Grima.   2016–17 Schedule IDEAS CITY Detroit: April 25–30, 2016 IDEAS CITY Athens: September 19–25, 2016, in partnership with NEON Foundation IDEAS CITY Arles: May 22–27, 2017, presented by the New Museum, LUMA Arles, and LUMA IDEAS CITY New York: Fall 2017   IDEAS CITY Detroit Public Conference Saturday April 30, 2016 The Jam Handy 2900 East Grand Boulevard Detroit, MI 48202   11:15–11:30 AM: Welcome Address by IDEAS CITY, Maurice Cox, and Rembert Browne   11:30 AM–1 PM: Session 1 Opening Keynote by Theaster Gates Talk by Amanda Williams Panel Discussion with Michelle T. Boone, Theaster Gates, Jenny Lee, and Amanda Williams Presentations by Studio Laboratory Fellows   1:30–3 PM: Session 2 Opening Keynote by dream hampton Panel Discussion with Rembert Browne, Halima Cassells, dream hampton, and Sonya S. Mays Presentations by Studio Laboratory Fellows   3:30–7 PM: Session 3 Opening Keynote by Walter Hood Talk by Bryan Boyer Panel Discussion with Kunlé Adeyemi, Bryan Boyer, Ellie Abrons/T+E+A+M, and Walter Hood Presentations by Studio Laboratory Fellows Screening by Liam Young
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At the Chicago Architecture Biennial, 99 architects answer, “What’s Urgent?”

The day started with a marathon session involving all participants in the Chicago Architecture Biennial. Hans-Ulrich Obrist, celebrated curator at the Serpentine gallery in London, together with Sarah Herda, director of the Graham Foundation, and architect Joseph Grima, both Chicago Biennial directors, asked 99 architects one simple question: What is urgent? Every participant had 15 seconds to speak, followed by impromptu questions by the curators. The responses were billed as "Telegrams to the World." As Obrist explained, this format turns a boring conference model into something of a non-conference. The ideas and information are not announced and then delivered. They simply happen informally and as the conversations goes. One of the first participants was architect Andrés Jacque with his call that architecture needs to be more political. Fake Industries Architectural Agonism replied with the message that there should be more open competitions for architects. There were other calls for urgencies, such as achieving gender equality in architecture and using uninhabited housing stock in Greece to house refugees instead of building camps, as well as calling for more order in architecture by Ben Aranda. Some who were not present in Chicago in person, or architects who were putting last touches on their installations in the Biennial's main exhibition space left notes that were read aloud. For example, a mischievous note by Italian architect Stefano Boeri was read in his absentia: "Nothing serious can be said about architecture in 15 seconds." There were some other notes of dissent to the topic of urgency such as "Nothing is urgent" and "Deadlines are urgent more than anything". In redux, those statements offered a cross-section of architects thinking practically about their daily practices and challenges. The event went for a while and was meant to be a place where one comes and goes as one wishes, somewhat similar to a radio program performed in situ.
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Rapid Response: Jeanne Gang reimagines the police station in Chicago

"We were outraged by what we saw—by the violence in everyday life," said Jeanne Gang when asked about the impetuous behind her firm's project Polis Project, a proposed reinvention of the typical police station on view at the Chicago Cultural Center as part of the Chicago Architecture Biennial. The work, like any number of projects in the exhibition, highlights the what curator Joseph Grima calls “architectural agency,” where firms take on projects not for a client, but out of a sense of urgency to architecturally address important issues. Sparked by incidents of police violence against African Americans across the United States and supported by the May 2015 Obama administration policy brief: the “Final Report of the President’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing,” Studio Gang’s research and design proposal flanks the two sides of the Center’s grand stair. One side displays a history of law enforcement architectures—from the neighborhood police box to today’s bunker-like stations—and the other a design proposal for Chicago’s 10th District Station in Lawndale. “We asked ourselves “What is a police station in the 21st Century?”” she noted, pointing out that while past incarnations were community-based as police officers moved out of the neighborhoods where they had a beat, the tensions between locals and officers increased. The architecture of reflected that conflict. “The police station doesn’t carry the same ideas of democracy as a court house,” she noted, but by imbuing these values into the station building, Studio Gang hopes to point a way forward to a new idea of architecture. "Everyone comes though the same front door," Gang said, and explained how the building is more like a community center than a jail. Little things, like free Wi-Fi, and big things, like mental health services, computer labs, park space and retrofitted housing for officers in the neighborhoods, are meant to break down the barriers between the police and residents. Work is already underway. A police-owned parking lot is being transformed into a new park and basketball courts that is meant to be a shared, non-confrontational space in the neighborhood. “This community will have a safe place to play.”
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HUD Secretary Julian Castro to headline IDEAS CITY 2015 in New York City

Julian Castro, the United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, has been announced as the keynote speaker for the third annual IDEAS CITY festival in New York.  IDEAS CITY is a biennial street fair that “explores the future of cities with culture as a driving force.” It will launch its third annual rendition on May 28th–30th on the Bowery. Castro will address this year’s theme of “The Invisible City,” highlighting the parts of the city that go unseen, or the forces that are driving change that are not always easy to map. Castro was appointed Secretary of HUD in July, after gaining notoriety as not only an up-and-coming Democratic mayor of San Antonio, who has been mentioned as a possible Vice Presidential candidate in the 2016 race, but also as a strong advocate and innovator in urban policy with a design slant. From the IDEAS CITY website:

As three-term mayor of San Antonio, Julián Castro was known for innovative governance. His “Decade of Downtown” program campaigned for new investments in San Antonio’s city center and older communities and brought in $350 million of private sector money, generating more than 2,400 housing units. In 2010, Castro was enrolled in the World Economic Forum’s list of Young Global Leaders and named by Time magazine as one of its “40 under 40” list of notable leaders in American politics. At the 2012 Democratic National Convention, he became the first Latino to deliver a keynote. Castro took office as the sixteenth Secretary of the US Department of Housing and Urban Development on July 28, 2014.

This year’s festival promises to be an energetic follow-up to the previous years under the direction of Joseph Grima, who has been involved in no less than three Biennials in the last year, including Chicago’s Architecture Biennial and Biennale Interieur in Belgium. IDEAS CITY is also a partnership of The New Museum (Founder), The Architectural League of New York, Bowery Poetry Club, The Cooper Union, Storefront for Art & Architecture, The Drawing Center. Some of the other events that stand out are: —IDEAS CITY Street ProgramInstitute for Public Architecture: Total ResetKurt Andersen, Carmen Yulín Cruz, and others: MAYORAL CONVERSATION: Finding The Invisible CityRhizome: AIRBNB Pavilion: Stay With MeKim Stanley Robinson, Bjarke Ingels: Make No Little Plans: A CONVERSATION IN TWO PARTS:Part 1. Toward A Plausible UtopiaMunicipal Art Society, Architizer: Pitching the CityManny Cantor Center, Laura Nova: Moving Stories