Posts tagged with "Jewelry":

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LACMA acquires multimedia works by L.A.–based designers

The Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) recently announced a new crop of museum acquisitions that includes a variety of multimedia works by several Los Angeles–area architects and designers. Included in the set of new acquisitions, according to LACMA Unframed, is a neon lamp designed by Jimenez Lai of Bureau Spectacular. The so-called Scribble lamp is an outgrowth of the firm’s Tower of Twelve Stories installation at the 2016 Coachella music festival. The fixture is made up of a singular light tube that has been bent and folded to look like a bit of “neon gibberish” drawn by Lai. The circular light is designed so that it touches down at four points, relying on similar structural principles as those explored in the Coachella tower. Other examples of Lai’s work are also featured in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. Architect Jenny Wu’s Catena necklace, a work designed in Autodesk Maya, made from stainless steel-infiltrated with bronze, and fabricated using binder jet 3D-printing, was also chosen for LACMA’s permanent collection. Wu is a principal and co-founder of architecture firm Oyler Wu Collaborative and is also the creative force behind the 3-D-printed jewelry outfit LACE that fabricated the Catena necklace. Wu’s work with LACE began in 2014 as an offshoot stemming from a one-off production and has grown in the years since into a full line of 3-D-printed works meant to act as “architecture on the body,” according to the architect. The signature LACE Collection utilizes advanced 3-D-printing techniques like selective laser sintering and wax pattern 3-D-printing to create intricate works in nylon, steel, and precious metals. Describing the highlighted jewelry line, Wu explained that LACE was a continuation of the “experimentation in fabrication, material research, and design innovation” that drives her architectural work. Wu added, “I think this just propels us to keep pushing what we do, whether it’s [designing] an installation, a building, or a piece of jewelry.” Oyler Wu also has work featured in the permanent collection of the San Francisco Museum of Art. Architect Elena Manferdini’s recent project titled Building Portraits has also been acquired by LACMA. The multimedia project is an exploration of the digital weaving of architectural elements. The museum is collecting two groups of works associated with a multi-part project, including a set of two physical models, five drawings, a silk scarf, and a rug. For the project, Manferdini utilized digital weaving technologies to create graphic geometric prints that were then converted into the various textile forms and ultimately extrapolated into building facades. Explaining the project via email, Manferdini said, “The pieces acquired by the museum delineate my work’s progression from scripted drawings to textiles to building facades. It is a snapshot of my process of creation and the way in which certain ideas and techniques come to fruition in the field of design and architecture.” The architect added, “Being part of this collection gives to the work the exposure through time to a larger audience and can have tremendous value for research.” LACMA also acquired works by sculptor Ben Medansky, L.A. arts collective The Machine Project, sculptor Adam Silverman, artist David Wiseman, artists the Haas Brothers, and graphic designer Ed Fella.
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Put a Ring on It: Architectural Jewelry Features Functional Measuring Tools

Rather than wear your heart on your sleeve, why not sport your passion on your finger? Peruvian architect Diego Delgado-Elias has created a collection of rings ornamented with miniature mainstays of the architect’s toolkit. Scaled-down yet fully functional set squares, protractors, scale rulers, and levels made of brushed silver adorn wearable rings designed for the architect who lives and breathes the profession. “The collection came about as a result of researching the life of an architect and their daily routines,” Delgado-Elias told Dezeen. “I’ve always been interested in designing jewelry but I wanted it to be something that related to me as an architect, in a practical way.” Nothing says “Architect on duty” like utilitarian jewelry. The limited-edition pieces are wrought by Parisian atelier Bermudes, which also crafts jewelry for Piaget and Cartier. Based on the sketches and 3D models provided by Delgado-Elias, the atelier then prints the designs in 3D, molds them, and laser engraves the detailing. Rather than simply creating creating mini-sized lookalikes, Delgado-Elias designed the scale ruler and other pieces to take perfectly accurate measurements. Delgado-Elias initially toyed with the idea of making the jewelry by hand—seeing as each piece emphasizes the handiwork at the heart of architecture, despite increasingly intuitive modeling software. However, the Peruvian craftsman he hired could not achieve the same clean-cut lines and pinpoint precision as laser technology.“I wanted to make them functional and respect the scale,” said the architect, a graduate of Ecole Spéciale d’Architecture in Paris, who set up his own architecture studio in Paris after working at an international architecture firm for 10 years.
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LACE by Jenny Wu, Prêt-à-3D Print

Oyler Wu Collaborative partner delves into jewelry design.

Oyler Wu Collaborative partner Jenny Wu had long dreamed of designing jewelry—just as soon as she found some spare time. Last fall, she realized that she might wait forever for a break from her busy architecture practice. "At some point I decided, 'I'll design some pieces, and the easiest way to make it happen is just to 3D print them,'" said Wu. She fabricated a couple of necklaces, and brought them on her just-for-fun trip to Art Basel Miami Beach 2013. "I wore my pieces around, and I was stunned by the response I was getting," she recalled. "People kept coming up to me, literally every five seconds. After a while, I thought, 'Maybe I do have something that's unique, especially for a design crowd.'" Back home in Los Angeles, Wu began prototyping necklaces and earrings for retail sale under the name LACE. Though she originally planned to use 3D printing only to mock up her designs, she decided carry the technology through to her finished pieces. "I'd like to do more high-end, low-run pieces," said Wu. "Especially for jewelry, when you're making custom pieces, people are willing to wait for them. It just made sense from the production point of view for me to use 3D printing." Wu's next step was to design additional pieces and test materials. Typical 3D printing materials like nylon "might look great, but they're extremely fragile and brittle," explained Wu. "Especially resins—they don't have the right tensile quality. Like if you're wearing a necklace and someone hugs you too hard [it can break]." Wu's current line includes necklaces in an elastic nylon material. She also offers earrings and rings in polished nylon that takes advantage of selective laser sintering (SLS) technology, plus a premium cast-metal series that utilizes 3D-printed wax molds.
  • Fabricator Jenny Wu
  • Designers Jenny Wu
  • Location Los Angeles, CA
  • Date of Completion ongoing
  • Material elastic nylon, polished nylon, polished sterling silver
  • Process 3D modeling, 3D printing, SLS, casting
Wu, who is collaborating with Stratasys on certain designs in addition to partnering with other professional 3D printing firms, aspires to use the technology as more than just a production expedient. "Pieces that push the technology are important," she said. "There's so much detail you can introduce in 3D printing, even in metals. You can create this nice edge detail—it's something I notice, but it isn't necessarily something you'd see in jewelry." Nor is the speed with which she can materialize a concept typical by jewelry-world standards. "I can make these chain-link pieces as part of one print, because the support material is something like powder that you can basically wash off," explained Wu. "That's what's amazing, where in the traditional jewelry-making process you'd have to make individual links that you'd eventually assemble." In a neat closing of the circle, LACE returned to Art Basel Miami Beach last week, this time in a pop-up shop at Aqua Art Miami. One year into her experiment, Wu is comfortable having one foot each in the worlds of jewelry and architecture. "If you look at the jewelry pieces, you see how they could relate to our architecture: our emphasis on line-based geometries, the interesting bundling and layering of material, and creating something very spatial, not graphic and flat," she said. "I don't see a separation between my architecture and my jewelry." As for the day-to-day reality of spearheading two creative businesses at once, that seems to be working, too. LACE is in Wu's name, but "the work's happening simultaneously with all the same people," she said. "While it may have its own identity, it's very much part of our office in terms of production. We like how it keeps things fun."
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On View> The Cincinnati Museum of Art Presents The Modernist Jewelry of Art Smith

From the Village to Vogue: The Modernist Jewelry of Art Smith Cincinnati Museum of Art 953 Eden Park Drive Cincinnati, OH Through May 18 From the Village to Vogue: The Modernist Jewelry of Art Smith consists of twenty-four pieces of silver and gold jewelry created by the Brooklyn-reared modernist jeweler Arthur Smith (1917–1982). Smith trained at Cooper Union and opened his first shop on Cornelia Street in Greenwich Village in 1946. Art was an active supporter of the black and gay rights movement and early black modern dance groups. He included these themes in his works. Charles Russell, Smith’s life partner and heir donated the majority of the jewelry in the show. This collection was organized by the Brooklyn Museum, where it was originally shown in 2008. Smith’s Jewelry will be complemented by pieces by his contemporaries and archival material from the artist’s estate, such as sketches, the original shop sign, Smith’s tools, and period photographs of models wearing the jewelry. On view are thirty pieces of modernist jewelry from the permanent collection by such artists as Elsa Freund, Claire Falkenstein, Ed Weiner, and Frank Rebajes. From the Village to Vogue creates a dialogue about the thin line between craft and high art.
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ICFF Walkabout: Wearable Maps

One item that caught our eye at ICFF wasn't furniture at all. Every city has certain geographic quirks that people come to identify with a place--Manhattan's rigid grid, the radial boulevards of Paris--even when viewing a two-dimensional version of it. You Are Here, a collection from Israeli jewelry designer Talia Wiener, was inspired by just such a concept. Each pendant or brooch incorporates part of the urban fabric of  Rome, Paris, Tel Aviv, Jerusalem, New York City, San Francisco, Barcelona, or London. According to Wiener, her designs play with the notion that there is a certain location-oriented secret shared by a city's residents while also proclaiming their membership in "a broader, ever-growing urban tribe."