Posts tagged with "IwamotoScott":

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Cooper Hewitt celebrates 20 years of National Design Awards with 2019 winners

The Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum has announced its 2019 National Design Awards winners, choosing to honor 11 designers and studios who are using design to improve the world for the better. The program was launched in 2000 by the White House Millennium Council and has celebrated a wide variety of architects, designers, and advocates ever since. This year’s winners are as follows: Lifetime Achievement: The San Francisco-based graphic designer Susan Kare was recognized for her decades of contributions to modern icon design. Kare, the creative director of Pinterest since 2015, is responsible for many of the original Mac’s classic icons and typefaces. Susan Kare Design has worked for brands such as Facebook, IBM, Microsoft, and other titans for the last 25 years. Architecture Design: Fresh off the completion of the Glenstone Museum in Potomac, Maryland, last year, Thomas Phifer was recognized as the 2019 Architecture Design award winner. Phifer, currently the William Henry Bishop Visiting Professor of Architectural Design at the Yale School of Architecture, is the founder of Thomas Phifer and Partners. Interior Design: San Francisco’s IwamotoScott Architecture took home this year’s Interior Design award, as the Cooper Hewitt cited the firm’s willingness to integrate conceptual research into its realized projects. Landscape Architecture: SCAPE Landscape Architecture was recognized for its numerous projects (and master plans, and research) that combine landscape architecture with living ecology. SCAPE works across all scales but its use of regenerative landscapes and public outreach is deeply embedded in the firm's process no matter the size of the project. Design Mind: Patricia Moore, author, designer, and expert on how peoples’ tastes and preferences change as they age, was honored with the Design Mind award. The Cooper Hewitt singled out Moore’s travels across North America from 1979 to 1982, wherein she disguised herself as an older woman to understand the challenges associated with living as an elderly member of society. Corporate & Institutional Achievement: The Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s D-Lab seeks to bring design and engineering thinking to the problems faced by those living in poverty. Founded in 2002, the lab now runs 20 interdisciplinary courses leading projects run by, and for, people living in poverty. Communication Design: Typeface designer Tobias Frere-Jones was recognized this year for his innumerable font contributions that are used every day, including “Interstate, Poynter Oldstyle, Whitney, Gotham, Surveyor, Tungsten, and Retina,” according to the Cooper Hewitt. Fashion Design: American fashion designer and founder of an eponymous fashion house Derek Lam was recognized for his relaxed, yet refined, take on sportswear. Lam’s work has been shown all over the world, including at the Victoria and Albert Museum and the Museum at FIT. Interaction Design: Ivan Poupyrev has worn many hats over his storied career and has always brought a multidisciplinary approach to interaction design. This year, Poupyrev was recognized for his work in blending digital and tactile interfaces and advancing more equitable interaction solutions. Poupyrev is currently the director of engineering at Google’s Advanced Technology and Projects group. Product Design: The Portland-based Tinker Hatfield was recognized for his four decades of contributions to Nike, during which he worked on the iconic Air Jordan sneakers, among numerous other celebrity collaborations. Hatfield is currently the vice president of creative concepts at the company, and continues to push for, and develop, boundary-pushing athletic shoes. Emerging Designer: The nonprofit Open Style Lab, a studio launched in 2014 as a public service project at MIT, took home this year’s Emerging Designer award and a cash prize intended to accelerate its development. The New York–based Lab is dedicated to designing wearables for everyone, regardless of disability, and its portfolio includes wearable technology, accessories, and novel textile research and applications. It appears that the Cooper Hewitt has increased the stringency of its awards eligibility requirements this year; individual nominees must have at least ten years of experience under their belt, up from seven last year, and Lifetime Achievement nominees now require at least 25 years of experience, up from last year’s 20. To be eligible for the Emerging Designer category, nominees must possess less than eight years of professional experience.
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Miami's crazy Museum Garage is finally complete and set to open

Following over two years of planning and construction, the Miami Design District is opening the long-awaited Museum Garage. The eclectic complex is located just two blocks from IwamatoScott’s City View Garage, another high design parking facility in the multi-acre retail and cultural neighborhood. The garage’s animated, wildly varied facades are designed by five architecture and design firms: WORKac, J. Mayer H., Clavel Arquitectos, Nicolas Buffe and Keenan/Riley. Located on the northern border of the Miami Design District, the 800-car-capacity Museum Garage is seven stories tall, rising from a ground floor entirely devoted to retail. Terence Riley, of Keenan/Riley, led the concept of the ambitious project, which drew from Exquisite Corpse, a surrealist parlor game that entails the collaging of images by different authors independent of each other's designs. In the spirit of the game, each firm designed an individual and radically different facade as disparate and unconnected pieces, creating a multifaceted tapestry for the utilitarian structure. Emphasizing the cultural purposes of Museum Garage and the Miami Design District as a whole, each facade is titled as a standalone curatorial work. Ant Farm, WORKac’s contribution to the project, is inspired by the maze-like layout of an ant colony, replete with circulation corridors that are obscured by a perforated metal screen. The bends and folds of the elevation are habitable spaces, public spheres provided with shade and protection from Miami's subtropical environment. J. Mayer. H, a Berlin-based firm, designed XOX (Hugs and Kisses), which is composed of large puzzle pieces adorned with stripes and bright colors. Nicolas Buffe’s contribution, Serious Play, features a diverse range of 2-D and 3-D details formed from plastic and laser-cut metals. Buffe mixes historicist elements such as 23-foot-tall caryatids with cartoonish graphics. Urban Jam by Spanish-firm Clavel Arquitectos is dominated by forty-five gold and silver car bodies that cling to the elevation. Stacked atop each other, the cars are made to resemble a vertical traffic jam. Keenan/Riley’s Barricades draws upon common orange and white traffic barriers to create a brightly colored screen wall that is studded with fifteen windows framed with stainless steel. British firm Speirs + Major designed custom lighting for each façade, highlighting diverse architectural elements across the graduated and uneven elevations.
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2016 Best of Design Award for Interior > Workplace: Square, Inc. HQ by Bohlin Cywinski Jackson

The Architect’s Newspaper (AN)’s inaugural 2013 Best of Design Awards featured six categories. Since then, it’s grown to 26 exciting categoriesAs in years past, jury members (Erik Verboon, Claire Weisz, Karen Stonely, Christopher Leong, Adrianne Weremchuk, and AN’s Matt Shaw) were picked for their expertise and high regard in the design community. They based their judgments on evidence of innovation, creative use of new technology, sustainability, strength of presentation, and, most importantly, great design. We want to thank everyone for their continued support and eagerness to submit their work to the Best of Design Awards. We are already looking forward to growing next year’s coverage for you. 2016 Best of Design Award for Interior > Workplace: Square, Inc. Headquarters Architect: Bohlin Cywinski Jackson Location: San Francisco, CA

To tackle the challenge of making four floors of a windowless 1970s data center reflect the contemporary culture of Square, Bohlin Cywinski Jackson organized the company’s headquarters around a central collaborative space punctuated by a library, a coffee bar, and a gallery—anchored by a monumental amphitheater staircase that itself functions as a flexible venue for a variety of activities. Custom white tables further enhance the stair’s visual appeal while encouraging dynamic use. The concept’s clean lines and predominantly white interiors reflect Square’s brand at both aesthetic and functional levels, successfully transforming the space while highlighting the company’s core values to create a refined, seamless experience.

Contractor BCCI Builders

Structural Engineer Tipping Structural Engineers Millworker San Francisco Millwork Lighting Manufacturer Vodes Custom Furniture Manufacturer Ohio Design

Honorable Mention, Interior > Workplace: Pinterest Headquarters

Architect: IwamotoScott Architecture with Brereton Architects Location: San Francisco, CA

Inspired by the clean, simple, and intuitive ethos of Pinterest’s recent web platform redesign, IwamotoScott Architecture and Brereton Architects envisioned a concept of porous concentric layers wrapping a repurposed warehouse atrium.

Honorable Mention, Interior > Workplace: Squarespace Global Headquarters

Architect: Architecture Plus Information (A+I) Location: New York, NY

To honor its client’s aesthetic commitment to minimalism, A+I sought to bring depth, texture, and warmth to the Squarespace headquarters in New York’s historic Maltz Building through a purposeful variety of spaces and the use of natural materials: polished concrete, wood, and leather.

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High-Design Parking Garage by IwamotoScott

Digitally-fabricated folded aluminum screen animates a utilitarian structure.

In the Miami Design District, even the parking garages are works of art. The recently completed City View Garage is no exception, thanks in part to a folded aluminum facade designed by IwamotoScott. Part of a design team that included developers Dacra and LVMH/L Real Estate, architect of record TimHaahs Engineers & Architects, architects Leong Leong, and artist John Baldessari, IwamotoScott crafted a three-dimensional metal screen for the southeast corner of the garage. Digitally fabricated by Zahner, the skin's gradient apertures and color pattern transform a utilitarian structure into an animated advertisement for South Florida's hottest creative neighborhood. IwamotoScott submitted multiple concept designs to the developers. "We had three really different schemes—they ranged in their complexity," said founding partner Lisa Iwamoto. "The one they came back with was the most complex, the most articulated facade. We were really happy with the choice." The final design was influenced by a series of external constraints, beginning with the desire to conceal parked cars from view. "It's a Miami thing; they don't really want to see the cars in the garage," explained Iwamoto. She pointed to the car park at 1111 Lincoln Road, where architects Herzog and de Meuron solved the visibility problem by consolidating the parking spaces at the center of each floor, away from the periphery. "For us that wasn't possible," she said. "The cars come right up to the edge so we had to find other ways of screening them." Another factor was the location of the property line—a mere eight inches out from the floor plate. This left IwamotoScott with less than a foot for both the skin and its supporting structure. "The strategy was how to create some optical three dimensionality, a facade that wouldn't feel static, visually," said Iwamoto. "That was our starting point. Then it was a lot of tweaking and geometric studies for how we could achieve those effects and make it buildable." The metal panels' geometric folds contribute to the feeling of depth, and add the stiffness necessary to meet Miami's heavy wind load requirements. In addition, the folds create a moving display of light and color under the city's ever-shifting skies, observed founding partner Craig Scott. "The faceting of the facade was a double payoff."
  • Facade Manufacturer A. Zahner Company
  • Architects IwamotoScott Architecture
  • Facade Installer A. Zahner Company (metal screen), KVC Constructors (office storefront)
  • Location Miami, FL
  • Date of Completion 2015
  • System digitally-fabricated aluminum panels on custom cantilevered aluminum structure, glass storefront
  • Products aluminum, glass
The aluminum screen comprises five panel types. All have the same border shape, but the dimensions of the apertures change from type to type. In early computer drawings, IwamotoScott modeled each panel type in a different color to keep track of the pattern. Over time, explained Iwamoto, "the colors became important to us, so that's how we rendered it." The client liked it, too, so the screen was ultimately painted in a custom spectrum reinforcing the aperture gradient. But while the facade is in reality a panel system, "we were interested in having it feel more like a mural than panels—almost like a piece of fabric draped over the garage," said Iwamoto. "For us it was important that the seams did not follow a more conventional pattern of vertical lines." The apertures are arranged in an offset grid, and the architects avoided a simple system of vertical supports. Instead, the skin hangs from a collection of staggered aluminum fins affixed to the garage's concrete slabs. Zahner fabricated the metal facade in their Kansas City factory. Because they were working on a design-assist basis, the architects were able to make multiple trips to the production facility. "It was cool, because they would make a panel, and we'd say, 'that's almost right'" before adjusting the angle of the fold by a fraction of a degree, said Iwamoto. "It's amazing how many ways there are to skin a cat." Happily for the architects, Zahner's in-house analysis resulted in a panel system remarkably close to what IwamotoScott had envisioned. "I'm delighted with how we ended up," said Iwamoto. "We did our due diligence [in terms of exploring alternative fabrication schemes], but it wound up that the best way to build it was the way we had conceived it." IwamotoScott also took control of an adjacent section of the garage envelope: an open entry stair, elevator bay, and multistory office block. "That was a bonus for us," said Iwamoto. "Rather than someone else designing it, it just made sense for us to do it—it was really part of our elevation." Because so much of the project budget went to the garage skin, the architects stuck with a basic storefront system. "We wanted to make something simple that still had a design character sympathetic to the garage facade." To create a similar sense of animation, they slightly cantilevered each floor and utilized glass panes of different widths and opacities. IwamotoScott completed work on the office tower through design development; TimHaahs took the reigns when it came to detailing and beyond. Part of why IwamotoScott was particularly eager to design the southeast corner of City View Garage was that it is the portion of the structure directly facing the heart of the Miami Design District. The developers' vision for the neighborhood is "such an ambitious plan overall," said Iwamoto. It is a vision that is rapidly coming to fruition, as she herself has witnessed first-hand. "From the time we started work on the project to when it wasn't even 100 percent complete, the area was transformed," she said. "That's really exciting."
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EVENT> Collaboration: A Conference on The Art and Science of Facades, July 26-27 in SF

Collaboration: The Art and Science of Facades Symposium: Thursday, July 26, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. UCSF Mission Bay Conference Center, San Francisco Workshops: Friday, July 27, 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. California College of the Arts, San Francisco This week in San Francisco architects and engineers at the forefront of facade design and fabrication will gather to present their latest work and research. Sponsored by The Architect's Newspaper and Enclos, the first-day line-up for Collaboration: The Art and Science of Facades includes Craig Dykers of Snohetta as the keynote speaker along with presentation by leaders at SOM,  Thornton Thomasetti, Firestone Building Products, IwamotoScott, Future Cities Lab, Gensler, Kreysler & Associates, Gehry Technologies, Buro Happold and more. On the second day, participants receive hands-on practical instruction through workshops with industry leaders. Those attending both days will receive 16 AIA Continuing Education credits. One day left to register! For registration click here. Can't make it out West this week? Check out the next call for papers: AN's Facades + Innovation Conference, October 10-12, Chicago. Download PDF.
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IwamotoScott Architecture: Bookshelf Screen Wall

Fabrikator Brought to you by:
Lisa Iwamoto and Craig Scott, principals at IwamotoScott Architecture first established a relationship with Obscura Digital, a digital media company, three years ago in order to collaborate on a new hemispheric theater encased in a geodesic dome in Dubai. While the project was scuttled by the recession, the two firms stayed in touch, and when Obscura acquired new office space in a 1940s-era warehouse in an up-and-coming San Francisco neighborhood, they again called on IwamotoScott to design it, and even invited the architects to move into their new space. Working with a tight budget, IwamotoScott injected digitally fabricated details that would give focus and add drama to the large industrial space. A black-box conference room that Scott describes as bringing “shrink-wrap to seismic bracing” is perched on the edge of a second-floor mezzanine while a 32-foot laser-cut screen wall comprised of cells that appear to collapse into fluid scales sequesters the architect’s space within the digital media company’s headquarters.
  • Fabricators IwamotoScott Architects
  • Architect IwamotoScott Architecture
  • Location San Francisco, California
  • Status Complete
  • Materials Powder-coated sheet metal
  • Process Digital modeling, laser-cutting, folding
Doubling as a bookshelf in IwamotoScott’s space, the screen wall deforms slightly in response to the mass of a geodesic dome in the building’s atrium housing one of Obscura’s signature theaters. “The pixilated, curving vocabulary of the screen wall projected off the spherical form of the dome,” said Scott. Laser-cut vertical fins of 22-gauge sheet metal are held in tension by channels anchored to the floor and ceiling, which in turn support 186 unique modules, each fabricated from a digital model produced by IwamotoScott. Perforations were laser-cut into sheets of 24-gauge sheet metal and folded to create boxes. The white-powder-coated boxes are mounted to the light gray fins with small Allen machine screws. Scott said the subtle difference in color enhances the feeling of shadow boxes. Beginning with a row of orthogonally-stacked modules, each of the 31 vertical rows of boxes radiates in a perspectival array to control the wall’s sense of porosity and filter light. “We tweaked the digital model to adjust for views,” Scott said. While facing the wall in one location might reveal a flood of light from windows inside IwamotoScott’s offices, from other locations, the wall appears completely opaque. Scott said Obscura Digital’s office own space is still a work in progress. Future plans include covering Obscura’s geodesic dome with a modulated skin over its metal skeleton. Scott said the process will likely involve digital fabrication similar to the screen wall, with perforated edges to create a system of dynamic folds.
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Catalyze This

Last fall, the Downtown Alliance unveiled a plan by ARO and a dozen or so other designers aimed at reviving an area the civic group dubbed Greenwich South. Among the proposals was an iconic, place-defining tower designed by one of our favorite firms, San Francisco's IwamotoScott. While the Downtown Alliance's plan was largely speculative, the tower has, uh, popped up once again, with bountiful new renderings on Inhabitat. It's not entirely clear why the tower has been so thoroughly expanded upon, but we're guessing all this new snazz has something to do with the firm's upcoming appearance at the Design Triennial opening Friday, of which it's a part. We've posted a few of our favorite renderings here, with more than a dozen available at Inhabitat.
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SFMOMA Extension: Channeling Your Inner Maya Lin

On Tuesday, SFMOMA will reveal the final contenders for the city's most prestigious project of the moment, the extension of its 1995 Mario Botta building.  But imagine an alternate universe, where an open competition would invite a broad range of concepts from established firms and fresh talent alike. This parallel world could be experienced a couple of weeks ago, during a final review for an architecture class at CCA. Craig Scott of IwamotoScott assigned his students the challenge of designing the new building. For inspiration, they started with two artworks from artists featured in the Fisher collection (e.g., Richard Diebenkorn, Gerhard Richter), and took it from there. The results, presented to a panel that included Joseph Becker, assistant curator of architecture and design at SFMOMA, were quite diverse and offered real insight into the puzzle. Think Project Runway, but for architecture, and you'll have a sense of how the day went. Figuring out where their snazzy new building would connect to the old, fiercely geometric building was one of the bigger conundrums that the students grappled with. Dylan Barlow came up with an intricate, cellular design that connected to the existing structure through its roof garden. This got the thumbs-up from the panel. "It isn't so bad going up through the Botta," said panelist and fellow CCA professor Keith Plymale. "It's getting up to the roof garden and having to come back down through it that's not so great." Barlow also incorporated the drop-off for the W into his scheme, envisioning it as a drive-through gallery that would give hotel guests a sneak peek at the collection. A more aggressive "intervention" was proposed by Michael Wlosek, who dropped a new top floor on the old building, leaving the top of the Botta oculus peering out like a periscope. Inside, the striped walls of the oculus functioned as a sort of art piece. There were also clear sightlines through the museum to the new space behind, which solved one particular problem. The tricky infill site, coupled with the extensive additional space that the museum is calling for--100,000 square feet of galleries and 40,000 square feet of back office--meant that some of these architectural models looked a bit like cardboard Napoleon pastry. Pedro Marugan's refined model showed how everything might fit together. The new extension will have a narrow street presence, replacing the firehouse on Howard St. The architect's standard imperative--maximize natural light, create a sense of transparency--battles with the museum's need to protect artwork and hermetically sealed environments. Annie Aldrich made a virtue out of that necessity with a canyon-like entrance that keeps the facade fairly monolithic. Inside, the interior opens up with shafts of light coming through jagged skylights. At the end of the day, I had a renewed appreciation for the difficulties for the task at hand, as well as for the creativity on display. What if the general public was presented with the challenge of designing the extension, if only as a fun exercise? That many more people would have a better appreciation of what it is that architects do.  It would at once demystify architecture, but increase awareness of it. And it just might make us demand more out of our built environments.
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The SFMOMA Shortlist: We Can Dream

The upcoming $480 million SFMOMA expansion is a big deal, and the names that have been bruited about are certainly Big Names. But you can also hear the rumblings: Why no local firms? And especially why so few women in the mix? There's reason to hope that the names mentioned so far are still tentative, and that there's a chance that the official shortlist, due in May, can remedy these shortcomings. Ideally, there would have been an open competition to bring in a broad spectrum of talent. (Renzo Piano, after all, won an international competition to design the Centre Georges Pompidou when he was in his thirties.)  But since that's not going to happen, what about inviting some of our local firms to take a shot at it? As the San Francisco editor of AN, here's a few I think could do us proud in tryouts: --Aidlin Darling. This rising firm's elevation of an old warehouse building (355 11th St.  in San Francisco) into a modern sculpture bodes well for what they could do with an actual museum space. --Anne Fougeron. The most prominent female architect in the city,  Fougeron does classic modernism, but with a twist that feels uniquely Californian, like the JFR house in Big Sur.  She likes to use slatting, which would be a refreshing counterpoint to all that brick. --IwamotoScott. They're known for their conceptual, not built works. But installations like "Voussoir Cloud" give rise to fantasies about wandering through galleries like clouds. --Ogrydziak/Prillinger. They have some very strange, interesting buildings, like the Gallery House they designed for an art-collector couple. Imagine the Botta being attacked by salt-crystal deposits. --Brad Cloepfil of Allied Works. Ok, he's based in Portland, but his renewal of 2 Columbus Circle for the Museum of Arts & Design in NYC is delicate and amazing: ribbons of windows run down the wall and along the floor as translucent strips of glass. If you were Neal Benezra, who would you grant an audience to?