Posts tagged with "Italy":

Placeholder Alt Text

Coronavirus-related slowdowns poised to pummel construction supply chain

While different cities grapple with how major construction projects should forge ahead—if at all—during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, the shipping and sourcing of the raw materials used in said projects has slowed to a trickle. As the New York Times recently pointed out, real estate development is a wholly international affair when you consider that the disparate elements that comprise a single construction or renovation project come from, well, everywhere. A decent number of building materials such as concrete and lumber can be domestically sourced, but countries like Italy and China, both of which have been profoundly impacted by the pandemic, are major players in this normally robust global supply chain. In addition to items like Italian marble, Chinese copper, and ceramic tile from Brazil, Turkey, Spain, and elsewhere, a slew of materials and equipment­ sourced from across the globe—paving stones, lighting, electrical equipment, elevators, and so on—have become scarce or are at risk of becoming scarce stateside due to shipping delays, travel bans, shuttered factories, and decimated workforces. As noted by The Real Deal, imports, including construction materials, arriving at the Port of Los Angeles from China were down 23 percent in February when compared to the same period the previous year. Per the Times, these delays, however, have not prompted widespread layoffs within the construction industry itself—or at least not yet. “It’s not like when you build a house and can just go down to a Home Depot and get a different light fixture when you’re short,” Chris Heger, vice president of Seattle-based construction management firm OAC Services, told the Times. “This stuff is all designed and planned years in advance. I’ve been doing this for 30 years, and I’ve never seen anything like this.” In-development projects have also been impacted by supply chain concerns, as lenders become increasingly uneasy about the unfolding situation and the overall viability of major developments that could potentially be halted mid-construction. “Lenders want to make sure they’re not going to be stuck with a half-completed project,” Frank J. Sciame Jr., chairman of New York-based builder Sciame Construction, told the Times. Many American builders already have the materials they need on-hand and, in turn, can commence with projects as planned (provided that the powers that be in some cities have deemed the project as being “essential”) according to The Real Deal. A number of importers have also stockpiled enough materials to keep the supply chain moving, albeit at a slowed pace, for a good while. But for exactly how long “a good while” and how large the impact ultimately is on the construction industry both remain uneasy, unanswered questions. “Have people experienced the impact yet? Probably not,” Mike Haller, president of Detroit-based builder Walbridge Aldinger Co., explained to Crain’s Detroit. “But will be impact come? Probably so. There’s regular building materials that come from China, for instance. There’s tiles that come from Italy. There’s stone that comes from Spain. There's curtain wall systems that come from Europe... It's gonna be impactful. How impactful, no one knows.”
Placeholder Alt Text

Vittorio Gregotti’s death marked the end of an era

Vittorio Gregotti’s passing on the 15th of March truly marks the end of an era. Gregotti is considered by many to be an outstanding figure whose career profoundly transformed the architectural practice in Italy and beyond. Known for his stern commitment to modernism, Gregotti decried the profession’s downward slide into frivolity. The mantra “form follows function” had lost, according to Gregotti, all utility: The market became for all practical purposes the substitute for function. This would lead to the corruption of the design process itself, bringing Gregotti to famously declare in 2008 that the time had come for “the end of design.” Nonetheless, in his own practice, Gregotti remained true to his beliefs, succeeding in culling major architectural and urban design commissions throughout Europe and Asia. Vittorio Gregotti’s reputation reached well beyond architecture—he was also a respected art theorist, editor, curator, and teacher. Gregotti’s interests led him on an intellectual trajectory that presents some contradictions however, at least to the extent that his convictions on architecture didn’t necessarily line up with his broader view on art culture. Gregotti, I would argue, benefited from his close contacts with two intellectual juggernauts of his day, Umberto Eco and Manfredo Tafuri. The first, a noted philosopher, semiologist, and writer, the latter the Marxist architectural historian and theorist. Umberto Eco’s influence on Gregotti in the mid-sixties helped shape the architect’s view on art theory, design, and communications. Manfredo Tafuri, in his assessment of Gregotti a decade later, attempted to expurgate these earlier mediatic dalliances in order to cement Gregotti’s position as one of the forerunners of a rigorous urban scale architectural practice. From my perspective, the 1964 Milan Triennale Tempo Libero (Free Time), co-curated by Vittorio Gregotti and Umberto Eco represents a turning point in the history of experimental exhibitions, one of the rare joint endeavors between an architect and a philosopher. This odd pairing shares similarities with another strikingly revolutionary exhibition organized in the mid-eighties at the Pompidou Center in Paris, when Jean-Francois Lyotard and Thiery Chaput co-curated Les Immatériaux. To create this exhibition at the Triennale, Gregotti and Eco plumbed a brilliant network of artists, philosophers, writers, and theorists who loosely belonged to Gruppo 63. Libero Tempo explored the city and the countryside, green spaces, sport and spectacles, and presented prototypes for domestic and leisure products. The design for the exhibition formed a procession of galleries, and spread into large muraled rooms and led into a spectacular kaleidoscopic volume—a darkened trapezoidal space featuring a multitude of reflected projections. In this hall of prisms, a singular filmmaker, Tinto Brass, then a young upstart recently back from Paris and deeply impressed by the French nouvelle vague cinema, created two short films on Tempo Libero and Tempo del lavoro. The exhibition installed audio works, including musical performances in homage to James Joyce, composed by Luciano Berio. Joyce remained a key figure in Eco’s open work universe. Clearly Gregotti absorbed Eco’s critical understanding of how communications and the mass media were transforming society, along with the importance of bridging the sciences and the arts to better glimpse the future. Gregotti’s fluency with the vast creative world outside architecture, surely bolstered his role when he became president of the Venice Biennale in the mid-seventies. This open-mindedness doesn’t come across much in Gregotti’s curriculum, however. This probably has a lot to do with Manfredo Tafuri, who authored Vittorio Gregotti: Progetti e architetture for the Electa series on contemporary architecture in 1982. Tafuri’s introductory essay “Le avventure dell’oggetto: architetture di Vittorio Gregotti,” (roughly translated as “The adventures of the object: architectures of Vittorio Gregotti” ) went a long way to readdress the contradictions inherent in Gregotti’s practice. First, Tafuri sought to undercut the story of the 1964 Triennale, no doubt because of his general antipathy for Umberto Eco. One should by experience be cautious when translating Tafuri into English, but if I can take a venture, Tafuri literally calls out Eco’s Open Work text before launching into a particularly scathing assessment of the exhibition: “The public therefore bombarded and violated. The sadism that dribbles out…” Tafuri goes on to qualify his view: “At the triennial of 64 the work of the architects, of the semiologists, of the visual operators attempted an inter-coda operation in an attempt to dominate and possess in its entirety the mechanism of technological broadcasters, to build a language of plurality and ephemerality, to operate a multiversum without information centers.” Tafuri here is making a clean sweep of Gregotti’s involvement in this exhibition, considering it a failed attempt to properly harness the protocols of communication. But Tafuri then rescues Gregotti, by demonstrating that when the architect joins with Franco Purini in Palermo in 1970, he becomes transformed, moving ideologically towards anti-utopianism while simultaneously rejecting the facile seductions of the megastructure. Tafuri further declares that Gregotti moved empirically towards an introspective architecture about architecture and territory. Returning to the mysterious essay title concerning Gregotti’s practice, Tafuri states: “From the fetish of the object to the crisis of the object, therefore: the Gregottian arc of research recounts the stages in the historically marked process, experimenting with diverse formal organizations…” I am not suggesting that Gregotti was in any way naïve about how others might have shaped his past. There is no question in my mind that Gregotti welcomed Tafuri’s critical reinterpretation, including the strategic distancing of his contribution to the making of the 1964 Triennale. This shift in tendencies is apparent when Umberto Eco and Vittorio Gregotti meet amicably on the pages of Lotus in 2008; when the two now older and wiser men bring up the discussion on the end of design. While Eco deftly kills the idea of form follows function once and for all, Gregotti falls back on the sanctity of the decorative arts, explaining that design had succumbed to a false aesthetic premise to begin with. This time there was no real meeting of minds, merely a retrenchment on Gregotti’s part. Nonetheless, this does not dismiss the importance of their collaboration back in 1964, and the incredible vision that Eco and Gregotti succeeded in communicating. Would we all have such contradictions in our closets.
Placeholder Alt Text

Italian architect Vittorio Gregotti dies of coronavirus at 92

Vittorio Gregotti, the Italian urban planner, writer, and architect behind the Barcelona Olympic Stadium died today, Sunday, March 15, of the novel coronavirus COVID-19. He had developed pneumonia and passed aged 92 away in the San Giuseppe hospital in Milan, where his wife Marina Mazza is also being treated. Gregotti was born in Novara, east of Milan, in 1927. After graduating from the Politecnico di Milano in 1952 he worked for Italian architecture magazine Casabella, first as an editor from 1953-1955, then as editor-in-chief until 1963. Later he founded Gregotti Associati International in 1974, going on to design the Belém Cultural Center in Lisbon alongside architect Manuel Salgado, the Grand Theater of Provence in France, the Arcimboldi Opera Theater in Milan, and numerous stadia including the Stadio Luigi Ferraris in Genoa. As an urban planner, his studio worked on the Bicocca district of Milan and Pujiang New Town in Shanghai, China. Outside the world of design, Gregotti was a major cultural figure in the Italian Communist Party. Some of his most notable work, however, was a curator. In 1975 he curated Regarding the Stucky Mill (A proposito del Mulino Stucky) which explored options for abandoned granary mills on Venice's Giudecca, being hosted in the Magazzini del Sale alle Zattere. The exhibition focused on land art and architecture and signaled the first steps to be taken by La Biennale di Venezia towards an exhibition on architecture, being a precursor for the Venice Architecture Biennal, established in 1980. “I don’t really know why [they asked an architect to curate the Biennale]—it was very strange,” Gregotti told AN's editor-in-chief William Menking in 2010. “I agreed to do it only if we also had a small first exhibition of architecture. That was the condition because if not, well, I wasn’t going to do it. The biennale had never had an architecture section, so this would be the first one.” In 1976 Gregotti was appointed as Director of the Visual Arts Section of the Biennale and he titled that year’s Art Biennale Werkbund 1907. He expanded the festival to include the visual arts and architecture, hosting exhibitions in seven venues across Venice, with five being dedicated to architecture and design. Gregotti was also Director for the 1978 Biennale, Utopia and the Crisis of Anti-Nature: Architectural Intentions in Italy. “In 1976 we started a different approach to exhibiting architecture,” said Gregotti. “One part was a historical exhibition, and the other was an exhibition of modern architecture featuring a group of Europeans and Americans in order to compare the two different positions. It was the 23 time of the New York Five, and in Europe there were two or three different positions, such as Oswald Mathias Ungers in Germany, James Stirling in England, Serge Chermayeff and a few others.” In response to Gregotti’s death, fellow Italian architect Stefano Boeri in a post on Facebook described a “master of international architecture” who “created the story of our culture.” Dario Franceschini, Italian Minister of Cultural Heritage also added: “With deep sadness I learn of the disappearance of Professor Vittorio Gregotti. A great Italian architect and urban planner who has given prestige to our country in the world. I cling to the family on this sad day.”
Placeholder Alt Text

2020 Venice Architecture Biennale postponed until August

The 2020 Venice Architecture Biennale, slated to kick off on May 23, has now joined a growing list of major international architecture and design events to be postponed due to the spread of coronavirus. As Domus reported, the 17th annual Biennale will now commence on August 29 and run through November 29. In a February 27 online press conference officially presenting the exhibition, its theme, and a full list of participants, Paolo Baratta, the outgoing president of La Biennale di Venezia, indicated that the Biennale would proceed as planned on May 23. That, obviously, has changed as coronavirus continues to spread throughout Italy, other European countries, and beyond. Italy’s northern regions, including the Veneto and Lombardy, have seen the highest concentration of outbreaks outside of mainland China, where the deadly virus originated in the city of Wuhan, and South Korea. It has also been announced that Italy is considering closing all schools and universities for two weeks in a drastic effort to curb the outbreak. Salon del Mobile, the world’s largest modern furniture fair and design event held annually in Milan, has also been pushed back until mid-June from its original April 21 kick-off date. Additionally, flights to northern Italy, Milan in particular, have been halted by major U.S. airline carriers in recent days, which would have further complicated the cross-Atlantic travel needed to attend many of the affected fairs. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention has also advised against traveling to Italy in general for the time being. According to a statement released by the exhibition's organizers and obtained by The Art Newspaper, the postponement is largely a logistical move made in direct response to these travel restrictions. “The new dates have been established as a consequence of the recent precautionary measures in the matter of mobility taken by the governments of a growing number of countries around the world, which will have a domino effect on the movement of people and works in coming weeks,” reads the statement. AN will update this story as we learn more about the postponement.
Placeholder Alt Text

Home 3D printed from locally sourced clay takes shape in Italy

Italian architect Mario Cucinella of Mario Cucinella Architects (MC A) has long been a champion of 3D printing technology. But while architecture students and firms commonly reserve space of their desks for a 3D printer to create high-fidelity scale models as communicative tools, Cucinella has set his sights much higher than the rest. Last September, printing began on the architect’s first prototype of a two-room house in Massa Lombarda, a quiet comune east of Bologna, Italy. Named TECLA in a nod to an imaginary place in Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities, the home was engineered by Italian company WASP to become the very first to be entirely printed from a locally-sourced clay that is both biodegradable and recyclable. That material is extruded through a pipe and set in place using a Crane WASP, a modular 3D printing system that can print objects as large as 21 feet in diameter and as tall as nine feet. TECLA’s earthy color, layered texture, and lack of right angles lends the home a resemblance to prehistoric dwellings and non-human habitats. And like those precedents, TECLA is also a product of its immediate environment and uses virtually zero waste. “Together with WASP” Cucinella said in a press statement, “we aim at developing an innovative 3D-printed prototype for a habitat that responds to the increasingly urgent climate revolution and the needs of changes dictated by community needs. We need a paradigm shift in the field of architecture that gets closer to the needs of people, thus finding an answer for the "Earth" within the "earth". A collaboration that becomes the union between empathic architecture and the application of new technologies.”

TECLA was developed through a set of research programs within the School of Sustainability, a program in Bologna founded by Cucinella to “train the design leaders of the post-carbon era,” according to its website. The time-efficient and materially resourceful project was established to address both the ballooning of the global population and the environmental impact associated with the building industry.

The first prototype received planning approval in May of last year, and construction is scheduled to be complete within the next few months.
Placeholder Alt Text

Here are the architecture and design events postponed because of coronavirus

Spring is traditionally the season when the international architecture and design community looks forward to the year’s biggest and buzziest exhibitions, events, and openings. This spring is different. As health officials brace for a possible global pandemic, a rapidly spreading outbreak of coronavirus (COVD-19) is hitting the design world, geographically speaking, where it hurts most. Outside of mainland China, where the virus originated in the city of Wuhan, and in South Korea, the most reported cases of coronavirus are in Italy, with a vast majority being in the northern Lombardy region. As a result, the organizers of Salone del Mobile in Milan, the world’s largest furniture trade show, pushed the annual event back two months. While the 2020 Milan Fashion Week was not postponed earlier this month, some shows were notably altered while China’s formidable showing of designers, buyers, and journalists sat this year out due to mounting travel restrictions. As Women’s Wear Daily reported, a handful of major U.S.-based media outlets that sent fashion editors to Milan are advising—and some mandating—their staffers self-quarantine by working from home for two weeks. Meanwhile, China’s own big upcoming fashion events, China Fashion Week in Beijing and Shanghai Fashion Week, have been delayed (some creative workarounds, however, have been hatched). Outside of design fairs, architecture exhibitions, and fashion shows, the status of what’s perhaps the biggest global event to take place this year, the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, remains uncertain although there are no immediate plans to cancel at this point. The World Health Organization (WHO) is advising the Swiss-based International Olympics Committee as to how to proceed. Below is a non-exhaustive list of cultural events, programs, and openings—the focus is on art, architecture, and design—that have been rescheduled or outright canceled due to what the WHO has deemed a “global emergency.AN will continue to add to this list as needed.

United States

2020 Tall + Urban Innovation Conference, Chicago: The Council on Tall Buildings & Urban Habitat has postponed its upcoming conference in Chicago scheduled for April 5-7. AIGA Design Conference, Pittsburgh: The Professional Association for Design's annual conference, scheduled to kick-off at the end of this month in Pittsburgh, has been rescheduled for November 12-14. AIA Conference on Architecture 2020, Los Angeles: The American Institute of Architects has canceled its 2020 conference, which was scheduled to take place May 14-16 at the Los Angeles Convention Center. The AIA is "exploring options to reschedule." The Architectural Digest Design Show, New York City: Scheduled for March 19-22 at Manhattan's Pier 94, the annual AD Design Show has been pushed back to June 25-28. The Architecture League of New York: In an email sent to members and friends, The Architecture League of New York announced the cancelation of a slew of upcoming lectures and events, including a series of lectures by the 2020 winners of the Emerging Voices program. The lectures will be rescheduled for a later date. Frieze New York:  Scheduled to commence May 7, the New York edition of the massive annual art fair has been canceled. Frieze London is still a go for October 8-11 as of this writing. The Harvard Graduate School of Design, Cambridge, Massachusetts: The Harvard GSD has canceled all of its upcoming spring events and public programming. The school itself, like many colleges and universities across America, has shifted to online coursework. The International Contemporary Furniture Fair, New York City: ICFF will return to its home at Manhattan's Javits Center in May 2021. The National Building Museum, Washington, D.C.: The National Building Museum is postponing its March 13 reopening following a three-month closure to complete extensive renovations. All special educational programming and events scheduled through April 30 will also be canceled or postponed. NeoCon, Chicago: Bustling annual commercial design fair NeoCon will not be held June 8-10 at Chicago's Merchandise Mart as scheduled. NYCxDesign: Scheduled to kick off May 12, this five-borough design bonanza features openings, installations, talks, and open houses. It's been rescheduled for October to coincide with a slew of existing planned architecture and design events including Arctober and Open House New York. The Shed, New York City: The Shed cultural center at Hudson Yards has suspended all performances and events through March 30. South by Southwest, Austin, Texas: The massive annual tech, music, film, and arts festival—along with all auxiliary conferences and events associated with it—has been canceled by the City of Austin. It was slated to kick off March 13 and run through March 22. "We are exploring options to reschedule the event and are working to provide a virtual SXSW online experience as soon as possible for 2020 participants, starting with SXSW EDU," reads the SXSW website. The Southern California Institute of Architecture, Los Angeles: SCI-Arc is postponing its upcoming slate of public programming through April 7. WantedDesign Brooklyn, WantedDesign Manhattan: The next edition of the popular two-borough annual design show WantedDesign will  be in 2021. “Having anticipated celebrating our 10th anniversary with our dear NYC friends and international design community, we are genuinely disappointed not to be able to proceed with our May exhibitions in Manhattan and Brooklyn as planned,” reads a post on the WantedDesign Facebook page.

Mainland China

China International Furniture Fair, Guangzhou: The 2020 edition of this long-running furniture fair was set to take place March 18-21 at Guangzhou’s Canton Fair Complex. It’s been postponed and be held on a yet-to-be-determined date. Design Shanghai: Asia’s largest international contemporary design fair was scheduled to take place March 12 through 15 at the Shanghai World Expo Exhibition and Convention Center. It has been rescheduled for May 26 to 29. “We have made this decision based on advice and information from government and local authorities,” reads the Design Shanghai website, “in China and consultation with our partners, venue and local team. The safety of our customers and team is our first priority. The venue and layout will stay the same and we will keep you fully informed of any further developments.” Festival of Design, Shanghai: As reported by Architectural Digest, this interdisciplinary lecture series launched by architecture practice Neri&Hu and held concurrently to Design Shanghai has been canceled. He Art Museum opening, Shunde, Guangdong: The unveiling of the Tadao Ando-designed He Art Museum (HEM) in the Guangdong province has been pushed back from its original March 21 opening date. The museum “is looking forward to finding a suitable date for which will be announced in due course” reads a notice announcing the postponement. JINGART, Beijing: The third edition of this hip nascent art fair has been canceled. It was scheduled to take place May 21 through 24 at the Beijing Expo Center. Shenzhen International Furniture Exhibition: Held annually in the southern Chinese city of Shenzhen, this highly attended event was scheduled for March 18-21. It has been postponed. X Museum, Beijing: The March opening of this Millenial-focused private art museum, launched by young collectors Theresa Tese and Michael Xufu Huang, has been postponed.

Dubai

Art Dubai: On March 3, organizers of the annual art fair, now in its 14th year, announced that it would be postponed. It was originally slated for March 25-28.

Germany

Light + Building, Frankfurt: The massive annual lighting and home automation trade show scheduled for March 8-13 at Messe Frankfurt has been postponed after “extensive consultations.” It will now take place through September 27 through October 2.

Hong Kong

Art Basel Hong Kong: The Hong Kong edition of Art Basel, which was scheduled to take place at the Hong Kong Conference and Exhibition Centre from March 19 to 21, has been canceled. As the Art Basel website reads: “We remain committed to Hong Kong and look forward to welcoming you to the next edition of Art Basel Hong Kong on March 25-27, 2021.”  M+ Matters: Archigram Cities: The opening of this highly anticipated series of events showcasing the archives of English avant-garde collective Archigram at visual culture museum M+ was delayed on February 12. A new opening date is forthcoming.

Italy

Expocasa, Turin: The start of the long-running trade show, focusing on interior design and renovation, has been pushed back from February 29 to March 28. Fuorisalone, Milan: Fuorisalone, an informal series of events that take place across Milan's different design districts in conjunction with Salone del Mobile, has been postponed to coincide with the rescheduled furniture fair in June. Salone del Mobile, Milan: On February 25, the organizers of Salone del Mobile announced that the international furniture fair was moving from April 21 to 26 to June 16 through 21 as health officials worked to contain the spread of coronavirus in the heavily impacted Lombardy region. Organizers launched a Twitter hashtag #salonemovestojune to help spread the word, proclaiming: "We can't stop. We won't stop." Syracuse University School of Architecture, Florence: The central New York-based university has suspended all of its spring semester study abroad programs in the Tuscan city. This includes the School of Architecture's popular Florence program based at Villa Rossa and Palazzo Donatello. Various other colleges and universities with campuses in Florence have also canceled their spring semesters. Venice Architecture Biennale: The start date of the 17th edition of the Biennale, curated by Hashim Sarkis, has been pushed back to August 29 by organizer La Biennale di Venezia. It was scheduled to commence on May 23. Despite the delay, the exhibition will still conclude on November 29.

South Korea

Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art, Seoul: Housed in buildings designed by Jean Nouvel, Mario Botta, and REM Koolhaas, this popular art museum is closed until further notice. Several other galleries and museums in Seoul are also temporarily shuttered.
Placeholder Alt Text

Venice Architecture Biennale 2020 will proceed as scheduled, announces exhibitors

Despite mounting fears that it would be postponed or outright canceled as health officials work to contain the spread of coronavirus in northern Italy, it's been announced that the 17th edition of the Venice Architecture Biennale is very much still a go and will kick off on May 23 and run through November 29. The exhibition vernissage–or pre-opening—will be held on May 21 and 22 as originally scheduled. The announcement was made by Paolo Baratta, the outgoing president of La Biennale di Venezia, via an online presentation held in Venice. The formal presentation of the Biennale was originally scheduled to be made during a press conference held at the Italian Cultural Institute in London on March 3 but was abruptly canceled earlier this week. In addition to confirming that the 2020 Biennale will proceed as normal, Baratta, as anticipated, further elaborated on the exhibition’s theme, How will we live together? The theme was first unveiled by curator Hashim Sarkis, dean of the School of Architecture and Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in July 2019. “There has been a constant theme over the years, the social advantages which architecture can catalyze,” said Baratta. “As we have often said, Architecture makes us more aware individuals, it helps us become citizens, not just consumers, it stimulates us to consider the indirect effects of our actions, it helps us understand more fully the importance of public goods and of free goods. It helps us develop a more all-around vision of welfare.“ Baratta went on to elaborate on the curatorial approach of Sarkis:
“In its broad-ranging gaze, the exhibition curated by Hashim Sarkis captures the structural problems of contemporary society. He observes—and we with him—that, in every corner of the world, phenomena of intense change are underway, they all differ but what they share is a need for important ‘adjustments’ in living conditions. Thus, the gaze of the curator and the Exhibition ranges even further afield. Architecture becomes the reference point of a vast interdisciplinary commitment and of a vast cultural and political commitment. “We live in a time characterized by a potential feeling of no longer being assured of an increasingly widespread progress but, instead, of being victims of the changes it entails. This is a time in which many could take advantage of the ensuing fears, worries, and changes to promote ultra-defensive campaigns. We find it useful if a Biennale can remind everyone that the identity of a society or a community lies in the quality of the projects it formulates for its future, to correct distortions and valorize resources. And, as can be seen by the many phenomena that are impacting the world just now, these projects can only arise from extensive awareness and widespread collaboration.”
In total, 114 participants from 46 countries will present at the 2020 Biennale—this is a notable increase from the 71 participants in the 2018 edition of the Biennale. La Biennale di Venezia noted that there will be increased participation from architects hailing from Latin American, Asian, and African countries. Thirty-six American and multinational teams with American members are among the exhibitors, and a complete list of participants can be found below. As for the Biennale’s crowd-drawing national pavilions, there will be 63 in total including first-time participants Grenada, Iraq, and Uzbekistan. The U.S. Pavillion is being co-curated by Paul Andersen and Paul Preissner of the University of Illinois at Chicago. Weekends on Architecture, a supplementary series of lectures and panels, will run throughout the course of the festival. And as during past Venice Architecture Biennales, there will be a special emphasis on education-based initiatives and programming for all ages. “The Biennale Architettura 2020 is motivated by new kinds of problems that the world is putting in front of architecture, but it is also inspired by the emerging activism of young architects and the radical revisions being proposed by the profession of architecture to take on these challenges,” said Sarkis. “But more than ever, architects are called upon to propose alternatives. As citizens, we mobilize our synthetic skills to bring people together to resolve complex problems. As artists, we defy the inaction that comes from uncertainty to ask ‘What if?’ And as builders, we draw from our bottomless well of optimism. The confluence of roles in these nebulous times can only make our agency stronger and, we hope, our architecture more beautiful.” Information on the Biennale’s exhibitors, programming, locations, ticketing, and more can be found here. Below are all 114 architects and architecture firms that will be presenting, organized by the Biennale’s five different thematic stations and their locations.

Among Diverse Beings—Arsenale

  • Allan Wexler Studio (New York, USA) Allan Wexler
  • Ani Liu (New York, USA)
  • Azra Aksamija (Cambridge, USA)
  • FABER FUTURES (London, UK) Natsai Audrey Chieza
  • Lucy McRae (Los Angeles, USA)
  • MAEID [Büro für Architektur und transmediale Kunst] (Vienna, Austria) Daniela Mitterberger, Tiziano Derme
  • Modem (Oakland, USA) Nicholas de Monchaux, Kathryn Moll
  • Parsons & Charlesworth (Chicago, USA) Tim Parsons, Jessica Charlesworth
  • Peju Alatise (Lagos, Nigeria)
  • Philip Beesley Architect and Living Architecture Systems Group (Toronto, Canada) Philip Beesley
  • Refik Anadol Studio (Los Angeles, USA) Refik Anadol
  • Studio Libertiny (Rotterdam, The Netherlands) Tomas Libertiny
  • Studio Ossidiana (Rotterdam, The Netherlands, Milan, Italy) Giovanni Bellotti, Alessandra Covini
  • The Living (New York, USA) David Benjamin

As New Households—Arsenale

  • Achim Menges / ICD University of Stuttgart and Jan Knippers / ITKE University of Stuttgart (Stuttgart, Germany) Achim Menges, Jan Knippers
  • Aires Mateus (Lisbon, Portugal) Francisco Aires Mateus, Manuel Aires Mateus
  • AL_A (London, UK) Amanda Levete, Ho-Yin Ng, Alice Dietsch, Maximiliano Arrocet
  • Alison Brooks Architects (London, UK) Alison Brooks
  • Atelier RITA (Paris, France) Valentine Guichardaz-Versini
  • BAAG Buenos Aires Arquitectura Grupal (Buenos Aires, Argentina) Griselda Balian, Gastón Noriega, Gabriel Monteleone
  • ecoLogicStudio (London, UK) Claudia Pasquero, Marco Poletto
  • Farshid Moussavi Architecture (London, UK) Farshid Moussavi
  • Fernanda Canales (Mexico City, Mexico)
  • gad · line+ studio (Hangzhou, China) Fanhao Meng
  • Gramazio Kohler Architects / NCCR DFAB (Zürich, Switzerland) Fabio Gramazio, Matthias Kohler
  • K63.STUDIO (Nairobi, Kenya, Vancouver, Canada) Osborne Macharia
  • leonmarcial arquitectos (Lima, Peru) Alexia Leon, Lucho Marcial
  • Leopold Banchini Architects (Geneva, Switzerland) Leopold Banchini
  • LIN Architects Urbanists (Berlin, Germany, Paris, France) Finn Geipel
  • Lina Ghotmeh — Architecture (Paris, France) Lina Ghotmeh
  • Miralles Tagliabue EMBT (Barcelona, Spain) Benedetta Tagliabue, Elena Nedelcu, Joan Callís
  • nicolas laisné architectes (Montreuil, France) Nicolas Laisné
  • OPAFORM architects (Bergen, Norway) Marina Bauer, Espen Folgerø
  • Open Systems Lab (London, UK) Alastair Parvin)
  • ROJO / FERNÁNDEZ-SHAW, arquitectos (Madrid, Spain) Begoña Fernadez-Shaw, Luis Rojo
  • Sahel Alhiyari Architects (Amman, Jordan) Sahel Alhiyari
  • SsD (Seoul, Korea, New York, USA) Jinhee Park
  • THE OPEN WORKSHOP (San Francisco, USA, Toronto, Canada) Neeraj Bhatia, Antje Steinmuller

As Emerging Communities—Arsenale 

  • antonas office (Athens, Greece, Berlin, Germany) Aristide Antonas
  • Arquitectura Expandida (Bogotá, Colombia) Ana López Ortego, Harold Guyaux, Felipe González González, Viviana Parada Camargo
  • atelier masōmī (Niamey, Niger) Mariam Kamara
  • Bouroullec Brothers (Paris, France) Erwan Bouroullec, Ronan Bouroullec
  • Cohabitation Strategies (Rotterdam, The Netherlands) Lucia Babina, Emiliano Gandolfi, Gabriela Rendon, Miguel Robles Duran
  • doxiadis+ (Athens, Greece) Thomas Doxiadis
  • EFFEKT (Copenhagen, Denmark) Sinus Lynge, Tue Foged
  • ELEMENTAL (Santiago de Chile, Chile) Alejandro Aravena, Victor Oddó, Gonzalo Arteaga, Diego Torres, Juan Cerda
  • Enlace Arquitectura (Caracas, Venezuela) Elisa Silva
  • Fieldoffice Architects (Yilan, Taiwan) Huang Sheng-Yuan
  • Han Tumertekin (Istanbul, Turkey)
  • Igneous Tectonics (Cambridge, USA) Cristina Parreño, Sergio Araya
  • Lacol (Barcelona, Spain) Ariadna Artigas, Mirko Gegundez, Lali Daví, Pol Massoni, Anna Clemente, Cristina Gamboa, Núria Vila, Jordi Miró, Ernest Garriga, Eliseu Arrufat, Laura Lluch, Lluc Hernandez, Arnau Andrés, Carles Baiges
  • Leong Leong (New York, USA) Dominic Leong, Christopher Leong
  • Manuel Herz Architects and Iwan Baan (Basel, Switzerland, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) Manuel Herz, Iwan Baan
  • NADAAA (Boston, USA) Nader Tehrani, Arthur Chang
  • OMA (Rotterdam, The Netherlands) Reinier de Graaf
  • PRÁCTICA (Madrid, Spain) Jaime Daroca Guerrero, José Mayoral Moratilla, José Ramón Sierra Gómez de León
  • raumlaborberlin (Berlin, Germany) Andrea Hofmann, Axel Timm, Benjamin Foerster-Baldenius, Christof Mayer, Florian Stirnemann, Francesco Apuzzo, Frauke Gerstenberg, Jan Liesegang, Markus Bader
  • S.E.L (Cambridge, USA, Paris, France) Verena Paravel, Lucien Castaing-Taylor
  • Sean Lally (Lausanne, Switzerland, Chicago, USA)
  • Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (New York, USA) Colin Koop
  • Storia Na Lugar (Praia, Cabo Verde) Patti Anahory, Cesar Schofield Cardoso
  • studio L A (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) Lorien Beijaert, Arna Mačkić
  • Superflux (London, UK) Anab Jain, Jon Ardern
  • TUMO Center for Creative Technologies (Yerevan, Armenia) Marie Lou Papazian, Pegor Papazian
  • UNStudio (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) Ben van Berkel, Caroline Bos
  • WOJR (Cambridge, USA) William O'Brien Jr.

Across Borders; Giardini—Central Pavilion 

  • AAU ANASTAS (Bethlehem, Palestine) Elias Anastas, Yousef Anastas
  • ACASA GRINGO CARDIA DESIGN (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) Gringo Cardia with AIKAX, Takumã Kuikuro (Amazonas, MG, Brazil) and People’s Palace Projects, Paul Heritage (London, UK)
  • ASSET Production Studio (Berlin, Germany) Anna-Sophie Springer with Ibu Kota Kolektif (Indonesia), Yayasan Peta Bencana (Indonesia), Nashin Mahtani (Indonesia) and Armin Linke (Italy, Germany)
  • Atelier Marko Brajovic (São Paulo, Brazil) Marko Brajovic, Bruno Bezerra
  • BASE studio (Santiago, Chile) Barbara Barreda, Felipe Sepulveda
  • Dan Majka & Gary Setzer (Madison and Tucson, USA) Dan Majka, Gary Setzer
  • Decolonizing Architecture Art Residency (Beit Sahour, Palestine) Alessandro Petti, Sandi Hilal
  • Dogma (Brussels, Belgium) Martino Tattara, Pier Vittorio Aureli
  • Forensic Oceanography (London, UK) Charles Heller, Lorenzo Pezzani
  • Foundation for Achieving Seamless Territory (FAST) (Amsterdam, The Netherlands, New York, USA)Malkit Shoshan
  • GFA (Sydney, Australia) Guillermo Fernández-Abascal, Urtzi Grau
  • Giuditta Vendrame (Rotterdam, The Netherlands)
  • Heatherwick Studio (London, UK) Thomas Heatherwick
  • La Minga (Quito, Ecuador)Pablo Escudero
  • Lateral Office and Arctic Design Group (Toronto, Canada, Charlottesville, USA) Mason White, Lola Sheppard, Leena Cho, Matthew Jull
  • Matilde Cassani, Ignacio G. Galan, Ivan L. Munuera, Joel Sanders (Milan, Italy, New York, USA, Princeton, USA, New Haven, USA)
  • Michael Maltzan Architecture (Los Angeles, USA) Michael Maltzan
  • MDP Michel Desvigne Paysagiste (Paris, France) Michel Desvigne
  • Monsoon Assemblages and Office of Experiments (London, UK) Lindsay Bremner, Neal White
  • Olalekan Jeyifous (Brooklyn, USA) and Mpho Matsipa (Johannesburg, South Africa and New York, USA)
  • Paula Nascimento (Luanda, Angola)
  • Pinar Yoldas (San Diego, USA)
  • Rural Urban Framework (Hong Kong, China) Joshua Bolchover, John Lin
  • Smout Allen ( London, UK) Laura Allen, Mark Smout, Geoff Manaugh
  • Somatic Collaborative (New York, USA) Anthony Acciavatti, Felipe Correa, Devin Dobrowolski
  • Studio Paola Viganò (Milan, Italy) Paola Viganò
  • Studio Tomás Saraceno (Berlin, Germany) Tomás Saraceno
  • UNLESS (Hamburg, Germany) Giulia Foscari Widmann Rezzonico
  • Vogt Landscape Architects (Zürich, Switzerland)Günther Vogt

As One Planet; Giardini—Central Pavilion 

  • Bethany Rigby (London, UK)
  • Cave_bureau (Nairobi, Kenya) Karanja Kabage, Stella Mutegi
  • Christina Agapakis, Alexandra Daisy Ginsberg & Sissel Tolaas (Boston, USA; London, UK; Berlin, Germany)
  • DESIGN EARTH (Cambridge and Ann Arbor, USA) Rania Ghosn, El Hadi Jazairy
  • Kei Kaihoh Architects (Tokyo, Japan) Kei Kaihoh
  • Mabe Bethônico (Belo Horizonte, Brazil, Geneva, Switzerland)
  • OOZE and Marjetica Potrč (Rotterdam, The Netherlands, Lubjiana, Slovenia) Eva Pfannes, Sylvain Hartenberg, Marjetica Potrč
  • Plan B Architecture & Urbanism (New Haven, USA) Joyce Hsiang, Bimal Mendis
  • Self-Assembly Lab (Cambridge, USA)Skylar Tibbits, Jared Laucks, Schendy Kernizan
  • spbr arquitetos (Sao Paolo, Brazil) Angelo Bucci
  • TVK (Paris, France) Pierre Alain Trévelo, Antoine Viger-Kohler
  • Urban Theory Lab (UTL) Harvard GSD / Department of Architecture, ETH Zürich (Cambridge, USA, Zürich, Switzerland) Neil Brenner, Christian Schmid
  • Weitzman School of Design (Philadelphia, USA) Richard Weller

How Will We Play Together?—Fort Marghera

  • AWILDC-AWP london (London, UK, New York, USA) Alessandra Cianchetta
  • HAJEK & SKULL + MOLOARCHITEKTI (Prague, Czech Republic) Matej Hajek, Tereza Kucerova
  • HHF Architects (Basel, Switzerland) Tilo Herlach, Simon Hartmann, Simon Frommenwiler
  • Ifat Finkelman & Deborah Pinto Fdeda (Tel Aviv, Israel)
  • Sean Ahlquist - University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, USA) Sean Ahlquist
  • Wissam Chaaya (Beirut, Lebanon)
Placeholder Alt Text

Milan’s Salone del Mobile postponed until June over coronavirus fears

The 2020 edition of Salone del Mobile, slated to kick off on April 21 and run through April 26 in Milan, has been postponed until June 16-21 amid fears about the spread of coronavirus in and around Italy’s Lombardy and Veneto regions. The rescheduled event is still set to be held at the Fiera Milano fairground and exhibition center. While cases of coronavirus, which can cause respiratory illness, have been detected elsewhere in Italy, most confirmed cases are in the north of the country with a vast majority being in Lombardy. At the time of writing, 322 cases of coronavirus in total have been reported across Italy, and 11 people in Europe’s sixth most populous country have died after contracting the virus. Worldwide, Italy has seen the most infections of outside of China and South Korea. Now in its 59th year, Salone del Mobile—also known as the Milan Furniture Fair—is the largest trade show of its kind, attracting exhibitors, media, and design enthusiasts from across the globe. In 2018, Salone del Mobile broke attendance records with over 434,500 attendees hailing from 188 countries. In a press statement, the event’s organizers pledged that despite the delay, the show—as it usually does—will go on:
“Following an extraordinary meeting today of the Board of Federlegno Arredo Eventi, and in view of the ongoing public health emergency, the decision has been taken to postpone the upcoming edition of the Salone del Mobile.Milan to 16th–21st June. “Confirmation of the change of date for the trade fair —strongly supported by the Mayor of Milan Giuseppe Sala—means that the manufacturers, in a major show of responsibility, will be able to present their finalised work to an international public that sees the annual appointment with the Salone del Mobile.Milano as a benchmark for creativity and design.”
Milan’s mayor, Giuseppe Sala, expressed similar optimism in a video: Although Milan Fashion Week proceeded as normal this year—but with at least one major tweak—the spread of coronavirus in Italy and beyond is having a significant impact on planned events in the realm of art, design, and architecture. Originally scheduled for the second week of March, the Light+Building trade fair in Frankfurt, Germany, has been delayed until September. A much anticipated Hong Kong exhibition showcasing the archives of British avant-garde collective Archigram at M+ has also been postponed. Back in Italy, the status of the Venice Biennale of Architecture, set to open May 23, is also hanging in the balance. A planned press presentation of the 17th edition of the Biennale scheduled to be held at the Italian Cultural Institute in London on March 3, was abruptly canceled. The presentation will now be held in Venice on February 27 and streamed online.
Placeholder Alt Text

Adolfo Natalini of Superstudio dies at 78

Adolfo Natalini, one of two founding members of the Italian avant-garde architecture firm Superstudio, died today at the age of 78 in Florence, Italy. Born in Pistoia, a picturesque town one hour northwest of Florence, Natalini graduated from the University of Florence in 1966 with an initial interest in painting. Shortly after graduating, however, his formative interactions with Cristiano Toraldo di Francia led to the two co-founding Superstudio and were later joined by Gian Piero Frassinelli, Alessandro Poli, and brothers Roberto and Alessandro Magris.
Skeptical of the conventions in the fields of architecture and design that had become widely accepted by the 1960s—corporate modernism, suburbia, and the rampant consumption of natural resources—Superstudio first made a name for itself by exhibiting subversive illustrations of alternate modes of planetary inhabitation. The firm’s renderings of impossibly-scaled mirrored pyramids and continuous gridded landscapes, devoid of the conveniences of modern-day life, were later referred to as “anti-architecture,” or what today might be described as an architecture of degrowth. Superstudio teamed up with other like-minded groups, including the Florence-based firm Archizoom Associati, to present their criticisms as far and as wide as possible for a firm practicing on the fringes of the field. After Superstudio dissolved in 1978 following a 12-year run, Natalini entered private practice the following year to apply his singular vision to built projects throughout Italy’s historic centers. His designs for the Edificio Per Office ad Alzate Brianza in Como (1978) and the Teatro della Compagnia in Florence (1987), for instance, exemplify the architect's ability to reframe pre-modern sites with bold postmodern design (often using grid designs first employed while as a member of Superstudio). He then became a full professor at his alma mater and established Natalini Architetti with Fabrizio Natalini in 1991, one of the last projects of which was the partial renovation of the Museo dell’Opera del Duomo in Florence (2009).
The news of Natalini's death comes five months after news of Cristiano Toraldo di Francia's death in August 2019.
Placeholder Alt Text

Steven Holl remembers Antonio Monestiroli

On Dec 8, 2019, Antonio Monestiroli, the great Milanese architect, theorist, and teacher departed our world. Antonio, who I knew for 40 years, was a teacher with a deep knowledge of architecture. He was also a builder who realized several important works according to his deeply held principles…so very rare in our time. Recently the website Socks reviewed his design for Les Halles, Paris 1979. His brilliant entry to that competition shaped a great urban park, with the severity of the spirit of Mies, fused with a deep urban commitment. Antonio was a rare man of didactic clarity, followed by his many students. He had an elegant gravitas but with a sense of humor. In his book, The Metope and the Triglyph: Nine Lectures in Architecture (November 2005), Monestiroli lays out a clear reflection on the separation of nature, technique, and history in architecture. Architecture from nature was shown by Le Corbusier’s Ronchamp. Architecture grounded in history by the work of Adolf Loos. Architecture grounded in technique by the work of Mies van der Rohe. The famous casa dello studente in Chieti, a 1976 collaboration with Giorgo Grassi, or the Concorso per una piazza in Ancona, 1978, both in Italy, are examples of the inspiring uncompromising severity of his architecture. They stand among many other works in contrast to his gentle human nature as a teacher. Antonio was an inspiring example of uncompromising idealism in our time of commercial frivolity. He will be missed. The above article was also copublished by Domus.
Placeholder Alt Text

A city making festival in Turin asks citizens to dream bigger

From October 18 through 20, students, architects, planners, politicians, and hordes of normal citizens all descended on Turin, Italy, to engage in talks, panels, workshops, and exhibitions at the third annual Utopian Hours festival. The name is a clever play on words; pulling the “nostra” from the middle of Torino Stratosferica, the nonprofit cultural body behind the event, results in “ours,” making the actual name of the festival more about imagining a utopian future for ourselves during that time. This year’s festival was held on the multipurpose campus of the Lavazza Coffee headquarters, offering ample space for the quickly growing event. Even before one entered La Centrale, a towering power-plant-turned-events-space, visitors were met with freestanding didactics featuring snippets of the ideas to expect within. Once inside, a sprawling exhibition floor presented visions of possible future Turins from local studios, as well as a series of low-cost placemaking interventions intended to be dropped in neighborhoods around the city. Upstairs, the festival’s organizers had set up a retrospective for the 100th birthday of Paolo Soleri, curated by Emanuele Piccardo, that tracked the Turin-born architect’s career and evolution in his thinking. Of course, civic engagement and the exchange of ideas were a central goal, and each of the festival’s three days began with activities to get participants involved. On Friday, that meant kicking off the event with a “Circular Economy Workshop” intended to make visitors brainstorm ideas for creating a more “circular,” sustainable Turin. On Saturday, Play the City started the day with an interactive workshop on using play and games to reimagine urban areas (the group would return with a presentation on their work in Amsterdam on Sunday), followed by a workshop on designing for the Turin of 2030, with the youth and elderly of the future in mind. Sunday changed things up with the chance to grab a more intimate breakfast with Jan Rudkiewicz of Werklig, the studio behind Helsinki’s rebranding; participants were encouraged to ask him about the intersection of culture within a city and institutional projects. The line-up was top-notch, as speakers from all over the world offered lectures and panels in both Italian and English. That included two mayors: Chiara Appendino, the mayor of Turin, who spoke at the “How is the Turin of our desires?” panel, and the current architect-turned-mayor of Bratislava, Slovakia, Matúš Vallo, who sat in conversation with Feargus O'Sullivan of CityLab for “How To Become The Mayor.” The shift in perspective throughout the festival, from discussions of institutional, top-down approaches to city-making, to how activists can make local, small-scale changes and advance their causes with grassroots support, provided comprehensive examples of how urban activists made people power work for them. Other discussions of note included a lecture from architectural photographer Iwan Baan on how to change one’s perception of the city, and how he approaches his work. Patrik Gustavsson of the Amager Bakke Foundation discussed the path to funding and ultimately realizing the skiable Copenhill in Copenhagen. AN web editor Jonathan Hilburg sat in conversation with Laurie Hawkinson of Smith-Miller + Hawkinson and Emily Bauer of Bau Land on how to “Make New York Livable Again,” no small task. With a mandate that big, the panel leaned heavily towards the topic of climate resiliency and flood mitigation; literally keeping the city livable. While New York is an international city and the myriad problems it faces are present in every large city, the task of informing a European city about the particulars of our own issues proved refreshing, if not daunting. One of the couldn’t-miss talks followed shortly after, as Alfredo Brillembourg of Urban-Think Tank (U-TT) delivered a fiery rebuke to the “one-size-fits-all” approach taken by many architects and urban thinkers today. Brillembourg ran down a list of the hyper-site-specific interventions U-TT had taken around the world in the last 20 years, including a cable car system through the slums of Caracas, Venezuela, and resident-led housing densification in the poorest parts of South Africa. Complementing the Soleri exhibition upstairs was what might be considered the centerpiece talk of Utopian Hours, “Paolo Soleri. From Turin to the desert,” a deep dive into the late architect’s utopian vision and thought process. Perhaps the most interesting additions to the festival, and the ones that elevate it above similar conferences, are the urban explorers. Three speakers who had never been to Turin before were invited to the city four days before the rest of the guests had arrived and given the chance to walk the city. Then, over separate days, they relayed what they had learned to festivalgoers and offered suggestions on what the city could do better. All three speakers were accompanied by flashy videos Torino Stratosferica had produced, tracking each urban explorer as they meandered around the city. Why were the urban explorers so important? Their inclusion lent the festival an “on-the-ground” feel, one of lived-in experience. It’s easy to research a place, but much more difficult to actually tackle it firsthand. Utopian Hours managed to draw an enormous crowd of engaged, thoughtful attendees who weren’t afraid to offer up questions or their own take on the material. The suggested €5 ($5.50) admission fee probably helped lure in curious passersby, and that’s certainly a good thing. Let’s hope the Utopian Hours festival make a fourth appearance. AN is an official media partner of Utopian Hours.
Placeholder Alt Text

The new Parco del Polcevera will revitalize the site of the Genoa bridge collapse

The Italian city of Genoa is getting a new park district at the site of last year’s deadly bridge collapse, as Parco del Polcevera will be located under the new Renzo Piano-designed replacement bridge set to open April of next year. The Italian architect donated the new bridge to his home city after the original Riccardo Morandi bridge collapsed last August, tragically killing 43 people. The design team for the accompanying urban renewal project consists of Italian architecture firms Stefano Boeri Architetti (SBA) and Metrogramma, as well as Dutch landscape architects Inside Outside. The design features a 5,150-foot-long red steel ring that will bisect Piano’s bridge, providing an elevated walking and cycling path through the valley area. A red wind turbine tower will punctuate the landscape at nearly 400 feet tall and provide the adjacent area with a source of renewable energy. At ground level, the park will consist of several parallel, typographically distinct zones that reflect the rich and diverse plant life of Genoa, along with recreational facilities, riverfront promenades, and industrial, office, and retail spaces.  The project is as much about the urban green space as it is revitalizing the city’s economy. “The Parco del Polcevera will become a new centre," described SBA in a statement. "All around it, the district will be reborn, understood as a community of life, relationships and exchanges. The BIC buildings in the Green Factory area, the New Forts and the ex Mercato Ovaivicolo become new hubs of productivity and innovation, essential ingredients for a sustainable rebirth also from the economic-financial point of view as studied in depth by H&A Associati.”  The Morandi Bridge was an important transportation link for the city, connecting Genoa to the northern cities of Milan and Turin and beyond to southern France. The urban renewal park project offers to revitalize an industrial area badly hurt by the collapse, which left 600 people homeless and isolated an entire neighborhood. Parco del Polcevera is meant to be a catalyst for growth and sustainable innovation in the still-recovering city as well as a memorial to the victims of the Morandi bridge collapse. At the park’s center will be the installation Genova in the Woods by artist Luca Vitone, dedicated to the lives lost in the accident. “A welcome to the world that crosses it and reaches Genoa from a network of infrastructure that stretches from east to west connecting Italy to Europe, parks perched on vertical walls, workers and noblewomen, singers-poets and naval engineers. A Superb City, even though it is afflicted by poignant melancholy; beautiful, even if in the harshness of its everlasting contradictions. A city of steel and sea, sculpted by wind and tragedy, but always able to stand tall,” said SBA founder Stefano Boeri.