Posts tagged with "Istanbul":

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What to expect at the 2018 Istanbul Design Biennial

The 4th Istanbul Design Biennial will open on September 22 and will seek to generate new ways of thinking about education in the age of artificial intelligence and ubiquitous technology. The six part Biennial will be themed “A School of Schools” and will be curated by Jan Boelen with Nadine Botha and Vera Sacchetti. The speculation on the possibilities of learning in the 21st century comes at a time of profound and rapid change in the ways we disseminate and receive information. The show is organized by the Istanbul Foundation for Culture and Arts (İKSV) and sponsored by Vitra and will run from September 22 to November 4. AN sat down with Boelen to discuss the upcoming opening and what we can expect. The Architect’s NewspaperHow is the Biennial shaping up? What are the latest developments? Jan Boelen: The 50 participants will be grouped into six categories. Each venue will have a zone for each theme. In addition, there will also be a public program, which is very important because the exhibition is not just the exhibition, but also the production and pedagogy. What are some of the physical outcomes of the open call? The open call has produced a diverse selection of ideas, proposals, and concepts from many disciplines that want to rethink design education. We are all framed by traditional systems of education, so we are trying to uneducate ourselves and start over. This is difficult, but we are using the Biennial as a space of exception, a place to experiment and try new things. The studio or practice is a place of learning, and the traditional architecture and design education is also a place where learning happens. However, these places have fixed outcomes, so we are investigating an idea that maybe a Biennial can come up with new models. It is a freespace for experimentation and coming up with alternatives. Furthermore, the Istanbul Design Biennial is a cultural event, rather than a hybrid format like some other events. For us—as well as the Istanbul Art Biennial—producing culture is part of the mission. Innovation can happen here and new ideas can be tested here.                         Who do you see as the audience for this? This has been one of the challenges of the last few months. We had a huge amount of applications, and we were overwhelmed by over 700 applications. It shows that there is an interest in the brief, and it came from people close and far, and from people in and out of academia. We had to ask, “Why do we need a change?” Obviously, the world is changing and therefore design is changing. There is an expanded field of design: It can be speculative, critical, or relational. There are also pragmatic solutions such as objects and outcomes. But too often, it is more of the same solutions that created the problems that we have today. I am not only critiquing it, but I think we really need it. By critiquing, by speculating, by building new relationships, we can rethink the design field itself. Hopefully, we can have this discussion with the professional field. What details can you give about the exhibition? We are building the exhibition that way now. It has several layers and ways to enter. We want to have two, three, four immersive installations that are related to the body. You don’t need to use your brain, but the experience is a conveyor of knowledge. This is why we want to make an exhibition and not just a book or a class. This way we can access a larger audience. The second part is that in each place, there will be a Wunderkammer, a “cabinet of curiosities” or a place of learning. It is a place to show off the knowledge that you have and share it with your visitors. It will be a kaleidoscopic place where design projects, etc. will show the theme. There will be places of learning, like classrooms that we will adapt depending on the content. We will use the exhibition as a place for learning. What is specific to Turkey here? Anything? We want to make this international, not just about Turkey. Design can make alternatives. We want to make sure we say that there can be multiple voices, not just one. I did a research trip to Turkey before I made the proposal for the School of Schools. It became clear to me that thinking about education was important for Turkey, especially new platforms and alternatives that the Biennial offers. I want to create a shared space for people to connect and share information and knowledge. What is the advantage of the Biennial as a site of dissemination? The content may not be so different, but the content will be presented staged differently. The biennial will become a school. The arts institutions are becoming research centers. The reformation of these things is a challenge. My comment and critique of the design biennial is that it is too often a cut and paste of the art biennial model. In a way, this is good, because it approaches design from a cultural lens, but it also disregards that design and contemporary art are fundamentally different things with different codes and processes. -- The list of participants was announced recently: [AI]stanbul (TR/US) AATB (CH/FR) Åbäke (FR/UK) Bakudapan (ID) Kerim Bayer (TR) Cihad Caner (TR/NL) Ali Murat Cengiz (TR/NL) Taeyoon Choi (US/KR) Commonplace Studio (NL) Jesse Howard (US/NL) Tim Knapen (BE) Danilo Correale (IT, US) Amandine David (FR) Teis De Greve (BE) Derya Irkdaş Doğu (TR) Eat Art Collective (NL) Ecole Mondiale (BE) FABB (TR) Studio Folder (IT) Avşar Gürpınar and Cansu Cürgen (TR) Mark Henning (NL/ZA) Nur Horsanalı (TR/FI) Ils Huygens (BE) Navine G. Khan-Dossos (UK/GR) Roosje Klap (NL) Land+Civilization Compositions (TR/NL) Pedro Neves Marques (PT/US) Margarida Nunes da Silva Mendes (PT) Alexandra Midal (FR) Carlos Monleón (ES/UK) Gökhan Mura (TR) Martina Muzi (IT) Nelly Ben Hayoun Studios (FR) New South (FR) Camilo Oliveira (BR/IT) Thomas Pausz (FR/IS) Ana Peñalba (ES) Juliette Pepin (FR) Charlotte Maeva Perret (UK) Radioee.net (AR/USA/NL) Emelie Röndahl (SE) Helga Schmid (DE) Judith Seng (DE/SE) SO? (TR) Studio Legrand Jäger (UK/DE) Studio Makkink & Bey (NL) SulSolSal (NL/ZA/BR) Jenna Sutela (FI/DE) Ali Taptık and Okay Karadayılar (TR) Jennifer Teets and Lorenzo Cirrincione (US/FR) Unfold (BE) Ottonie Von Roeder (DE) Henriëtte Waal and Studio Klarenbeek & Dros (NL) Mark Wasiuta (US) Lukas Wegwerth (DE) Pınar Yoldaş (TR/US) Peter Zin (NL/PT)
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Jan Boelen named curator of next Istanbul Design Biennial

The Istanbul Design Biennial has announced the curator for its 4th installment. Jan Boelen will take the reigns for the exhibition, which will be held in 2018. Boelen brings to the position extensive curatorial and artistic direction experience from current positions he holds in Belgium and France. Boelen is the artistic director of Z33 House of Contemporary Art, in Hasselt, Belgium, as well as the artistic director of Atelier LUMA, “an experimental laboratory for design” in Arles, France. Along with those roles, Boelen serves on the advisory boards and committees for such institutions as the V&A Museum of Design and the Creative Industries Fund in the Netherlands. Z33’s mission is to showcase everyday design objects and contemporary art in unexpected and novel ways. The institution sits on lines separating design, art research, and exhibition. As part of his directorship at Z33, Boelen also curated the 24th Biennial of Design in Ljubljana, Slovenia, in 2014. The 4th Istanbul Design Biennial will take place from September 22 through November 4, 2018. The announcement of Boelen as the curator is the first major news of the exhibition, with more information about the show’s conceptual framework expected to arrive in the fall of 2017. The 2016 edition of the exhibition was curated by Mark Wigley and Beatriz Colomina and focused on design as a means of understanding what it means to be human.  
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e-flux debuts an architectural edition for the Istanbul Design Biennial

As part of the 3rd Istanbul Design Biennial, the newly created e-flux Architecture, a division of the online art publication e-flux, is curating a reading room exhibition and series of written works that will also be available online. Under the title Superhumanity, editors Beatriz Colomina, Nikolaus Hirsch, Anton Vidokle, and Mark Wigley have gathered over 50 writers, scientists, artists, architects, designers, philosophers, historians, archeologists, and anthropologists to comment on the biennial’s theme, Are We Human?. Since September, e-flux Architecture has been publishing essays that explore the relationship between design and humanity. Contributors to Superhumanity include Andrew Herscher, Keller Easterling, Joseph Grima, Sanford Kwinter, and Liam Young.

Co-editor Nikolaus Hirsch explained the driving inquiry behind the project, and the breadth of design that was being examined. “Our question is: What is design today? Who designed the lives we live today? How does one contribute to such a world in which design is almost everywhere, not only in the newest chair but in online identities, personal devices, new materials, interfaces, networks, infrastructures, data, organisms, and genetic codes?”

e-flux Architecture will publish contributions to Superhumanity, on the web, and through email dispatches. The Superhumanity reading room at the Istanbul Biennial will be on exhibit from October 22 through November 20 at DEPO (Tütün Deposu Lüleci Hendek Caddesi No.12, Tophane 34425 Istanbul).

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A coterie of artificial islands and high-rises planned to rise near Istanbul

Fourteen miles west of Istanbul’s Atatürk airport on the coast of the Sea of Marmara, a pearl looks set to rise out of the water. Designed by Chicago firm Forum Studio, the mixed-use development covers 1,660,000 square feet, offering close to 1,500 residential units and a 500 boat marina.

The marina comprises a circular array of artificial islands. “The architectural concept derived both its form and defining character from the natural environment of the Marmara Sea coast,” said Erik Andersen, design principal at Forum Studio. “The islands are conceived as an alternative to a utilitarian seawall; they harmonize with, and extend, the region’s natural landscape.”

A “pearlescent” node that projects colored light beams into the air acts a visual focal point and hub in the center of the arrangement. The marina will also include an innovative botanical garden and a Marmara Sea research center that, according to Andersen, will “enrich the community with opportunities for research and learning.”

Low-rise volumes and a host of landscaping features make up the majority of the marina, facilitating undisturbed views out to sea for those living in the high-rise dwellings on the natural shoreline. “Changes in scale—from the monumental to the intimate—accommodate a variety of uses that will include nightlife and entertainment as well as family-friendly activities and academic marine research facilities,” said Andersen.

Andersen explained that a careful study of the ecology of the shoreline context “informed and inspired many landscape and sustainable design strategies.” The “dense,” pedestrian-friendly community is “organized around a network of landscapes that utilize native plants and natural stormwater systems for collection and reuse.” Andersen elaborated on Forum Studio’s approach: “We studied the project as a series of interconnected systems similar to a living organism. Each system informs and supports the other. The intent was to optimize performance in the way nature does with every living organism and every natural ecosystem.”

Currently, the project is going through initial municipal approvals for the land development. The schedule for groundbreaking is yet to be determined.

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MIPIM Day Two: Modeling and mapping the Responsive City

MIPIM takes place in the most complicated, counterintuitive series of convention halls on the Mediterranean waterfront. In trying to find the basement registration hall I ran into Ben Van Berkel who tried to help, but was having his own problems finding the ‘innovation forum’ that is the center of the architecture presentations. He claims he attends every other year because he can meet, in two days, 15 to 20 old and potential new clients. In the forum, we heard HOK present their Responsive Cities project that mines municipal data and then expresses it in maps that can be used by architects to drop future projects into and understand how they interact with the existing city. They showed a HOK sports stadium that might then become a useable bridge and public space during the day when it is not used for sports events. Speaking of models, MIPIM has a collection of the most fantastic scale models of cities like London and Istanbul that are enough of a reason for the design press to come to this event. This technical forum then morphed into a talk by Arik Levy, the Israeli/French designer who showed how to create value through the placements of art in projects and also bring culture to the places where working people spend their days. The forum was sponsored by Vitra, and they used their famous Swiss campus as an example of high design to super-charge daily life. We also met with Asudio, a young firm of ex-Foster employees who started up during an economic downturn and were able to get a series of schools projects that taught them to work efficiently and on-budget to produce impressive low-budget public work. They have also just started a new venture '63,000 Homes' that they hope can steer clients into creating work with innovative plans, uses, and architecture Asudio showed a new project that was meant to be a single commercial building, but they convinced the client to create two buildings that used a heat exchanger to transfer the daytime heat generated for the commercial space to heat the residential spaces when they needed the warmth during the day. There seem to be no end of the high technological solutions to everyday urban problems here at MIPIM. More tomorrow.
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Impossible Architecture imagined by Turkish Photographer Aydın Büyüktaş

Inspired by the notions of varying dimensions and surprise Edwin A. Abbott's Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions, Turkish digital artist and photographer Aydın Büyüktaş has created a fanciful Istanbul in his latest project. Aerial depictions of the city turn the landscape on itself—literally.

Using a drone, his photographs have been digitally manipulated to appear as if the city is doubling back over itself creating a fantastical curved world.

Büyüktaş's images can appear disorientating at first sight with the viewer's eye naturally following what should be linear forms that end up being viewed from alternate perspectives. The scenes resemble those from Christopher Nolan's Inception and Interstellar movies where cityscapes are curvaceous, both in dreams and in space.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LRT0GGTWYnM https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dG22TcpjRnY Creating the curving montages in a flat world  was no easy task. Drone's were sent up into the skies, but Büyüktaş had to rely on the weather and wildlife to be on his side.

"So many times I had to turn back without a picture because of bad weather, technical problems, or birds attacking the drone," he said.

Once he had collected all the images, Büyüktaş adopted the much more grounded approach of editing and patching them together in Photoshop.

"We live in places that most of the times don’t draw our attention, places that transform our memories, places that the artist gives another dimension; where the perceptions that generally crosses our minds will be demolished and new ones will arise," Büyüktaş says on his website. "These works aims to leave the viewer alone with a surprising visuality ironic as well,multidimensional romantic point of view."

https://www.instagram.com/p/BAQCOYCF8IT/
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Pininfarina and AECOM top Fuksas and Hadid to win Istanbul New Airport commission

Pininfarina and AECOM have won an international competition to design an Air Traffic Control (ATC) tower and technical building at the Istanbul New Airport. The team was selected from a competitive shortlist, which included Zaha Hadid, Fuksas, Moshe Safdie, Grimshaw-Nordic, and RMJM. “One of the World’s largest aviation projects, Istanbul New Airport’s air traffic control tower will be an iconic structure, visible to all passengers traveling through the airport," said İGA's chief executive officer, Yusuf Akçayoğlu, "We were looking for a striking design fit for a 21st century airport while remaining sensitive to Istanbul’s unique heritage." According to the design team, the tower's form was inspired by the tulip, a symbol of Istanbul's culture. This victory marks AECOM's first collaboration with Pininfarina, a firm recognized for designing cars for Ferrari and Alfa Romeo. "The collaboration combines the expertise of AECOM’s architectural and engineering teams with Pininfarina’s distinctive architectural style that epitomises speed and movement, influenced by automotive design," announced the design team. The Istanbul New Airport is expected to have the largest, annual, passenger capacity in the world, accommodating 90 million passengers per year at the first stage and 200 million passengers per year by the final stage. According to the design team, İGA secured a $4.9 billion loan from a group of six banks in October to fund the first phase. The following stages will expand the airport to include six runways and three terminal buildings. AECOM and Pininfarina's design will be approximately 22 miles from the city center, on the European side, adjacent to the Black Sea.
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Zoë Ryan to Curate 2014 Istanbul Design Biennial

Zoe_Ryan_01 Zoë Ryan, curator of architecture and design at the Art Institute of Chicago, has been selected to curate the second Istanbul Design Biennial, taking place from October 18 through December 14, 2014. Read AN's report from the previous Istanbul Design Biennial here. Ryan has been working to expand the Art Institute's architecture and design holdings and teaches at the School of the Art Institute and at the University of Illinois, Chicago. Previously, she worked at New York's Van Alen Institute and the Museum of Modern Art. (Photo: Courtesy Art Institute of Chicago)
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Unveiled> Grimshaw to Design New Istanbul Art Museum

Grimshaw Architects has been selected by the Vehbi Koç Foundation to design Koç Contemporary, a new art museum that supports cultural and social life in Istanbul and greater Turkey. Selected from a list of 20 globally renowned submissions, Grimshaw’s winning design calls for a stone-colored mosaic tile facade, a rooftop terrace offering sweeping views of the city, an education area, and an open layout. Located in Istanbul’s Beyoglu area, a region experiencing rapid redevelopment, Koç Contemporary blurs the boundary between inside and outside and includes a materials plan inspired by the mosaic-tiled forms of traditional Ottoman architecture. The firm’s design complements the distinct collection of paper, paintings, video, media installations, performance art and music events through a scheme that incorporates geometric volumes and exotic woods within the galleries. The Museum is expected to open in 2016.
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Turkey Passes Legislation to Protect Istanbul’s Historic Skyline Silhouette from Rapid Urbanization

For 1475 years, the colossal dome and four minarets of the Hagia Sofia have remained the focus of Istanbul’s historic silhouette. That is, until three hulking towers known as the OnaltiDokuz Residences interrupted the scene last summer, sparking another battle over development in the Turkish capital. In late May, the Hurriyet Daily News reported that the city’s 4th Administrative Court ordered the demolition of the skyscrapers, claiming that their construction was illegal because it "negatively affected the world heritage site that the Turkish government was obliged to protect." To guard against future infractions, this Wednesday the Turkish Parliament passed legislation calling for additional safeguards nationwide to protect historic areas from rapid urbanization. Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has expressed his distaste for high-rise development within the city in the past, and urged the towers’ owner, Mesut Toprak, to shorten his skyscrapers. The three towers, coming in at 37, 32, and 27 stories, are located in the Zeytinburnu district on the European side of Istanbul, and represent a recent surge in unplanned building and urbanization that is going on throughout the historic city. While the city’s economic upswing is welcomed, the non-contextual form it has taken is not. The public has reacted positively to the demolition ruling, but many worry that there is little hope in curbing the buildup at this point. “I side with a form of architecture that accords with our culture,” said Erdogan in an address to local lawmakers last month. “In Istanbul and Ankara, there are structures that have gone against the characters of both cities. I don’t approve of vertical structures; rather I favor horizontal ones. Four stories should be above the ground, while the other four should be built underground.” This comes in stark contrast to other cities like London and Washington, D.C. that are grappling with potentially raising height limits to allow for greater density and new development. Meanwhile, the towers’ owners plan to seek an appeal, claiming that they complied with zoning regulations and that their project is in no way illegal.
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International Winners of MoMA PS1 Young Architects Program

Here in New York, we're excited to see CODA's massive Party Wall installation made of scrap from skateboard manufacturing rise at MoMA PS1 for this year's Young Architects Program (YAP). But the annual YAP, which recognizes emerging architects and invites them to design and build a temporary installation, has gone global. MoMA has announced the third installment of YAP at Rome's MAXXI museum designed by bam! bottega di architettura metropolitan and has launched a new program in Istanbul won by SO? Architecture and Ideas. SO? Architecture and Ideas' installation, Sky Spotting Stop, calls for a series of mirrored sun shades that give height to the museum's courtyard and play off the waters of the nearby Bosphorus. The mirrored discs are intended to provide playful shadows and reflections during the day and can be uplit at night. The installation opens in June at Istanbul Modern. In Rome, bam! bottega di architettura metropolitan's Helium-filled installation, He, will float above the MAXXI's courtyard shading a grassy lawn and wooden platform below. During the day, water will drip from the installation to cool the plaza. At night, the mass will glow as a large, floating lantern. At the end of the summer, the Helium from the installation will be reused for scientific research. The installation will open on June 20 at the MAXXI museum. A third international program has also been established in Santiago, Chile.
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LEGO Star Wars Set Accused of Racism, Resembling Hagia Sofia by Turkish Group

This story appears to have it all: architecture, LEGOs, Star Wars, and controversy. The Telegraph reports that the Turkish Cultural Community of Austria (TCCA) has taken offense at LEGO's latest miniature plastic toy, a replica of Jabba the Hutt's Palace from the Star Wars trilogy. While some are calling the absurdity of the move a spoof, the group alleges the model is based on the architecture of Istanbul's Hagia Sofia and the Jami al-Kabir Mosque in Beirut, and fills the two revered symbols of the Islamic world with armed criminals. Jabba the Hutt is the slug-like alien and crime boss who maintained a mixed-relationship with smuggler-turned-hero Han Solo, at one point cryogenically freezing Solo. According to the Telegraph, the TCCA said on its website (in German), "It is clear that the ugly figure of Jabba and the whole scene smacks of racial prejudice and vulgar insinuations against Asians and Orientals as people with deceitful and criminal personalities." It has called on LEGO to apologize for the creating negative views of their culture and is considering legal action. A spokesperson for LEGO denies any link between Jabba's Palace and the Hagia Sofia.