Posts tagged with "Internships":

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Junya Ishigami cancels MIT lecture over unpaid internship pushback

The fallout over Junya Ishigami’s use of unpaid intern labor continues, as the Japanese architect canceled a lecture originally scheduled for April 18 at MIT over the issue. In March, it came out that Ishigami, who had been chosen to design this year’s Serpentine Pavilion, was recruiting unpaid interns to work 13 hour days, 6 days a week. On Instagram, Adam Nathaniel Furman revealed that prospective interns were also expected to supply their own computers and software, and that the firm would be unable to help prospective interns relocate to Tokyo for the 8-to-12-week internship.
After facing harsh blowback online, the Serpentine Gallery stepped in to announce that it was unaware of the practice at the time of Ishigami’s selection and would require Junya Ishigami + Associates to pay anyone working on the pavilion. The news quickly sparked a discussion over unpaid labor, and a number of other studios defended their decision not to pay interns, or to admit their culpability. Ishigami + Associates has stayed silent on the matter and refused a request for comment when the news originally broke. According to Archinect, students and faculty at MIT had viewed the lecture on April 18 as a chance to ask the firm about the controversy and wanted to schedule a separate event to discuss the issue. The studio demanded that there be no Q&A session at the original talk, which was to have been an account of its work, and declined to participate in a secondary discussion. Ishigami + Associates ultimately canceled the original event. On April 25, the Architecture Lobby released a statement on unpaid internships to Archinect. “Meanwhile,” the open letter reads, “as recently reported by Dezeen, Karim Rashid insists that unpaid internships are a ‘fork of furthering education.’ Rashid offers a four-month unpaid internship in his office, justified by his claim that ‘an intern can learn in three months more than a year or two of education, and education in USA is costing that student $60,000 to $100,000 a year,’ making universities, in his view, ‘far more’ exploitative. “There is no lesser evil in worker exploitation and a prohibitively expensive education system, and there is plenty of work to be done in fighting to change both.” The full statement can be read here.
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Making money as an architect is majorly affected by where you work

Architecture is notoriously known as one of the less lucrative professional fields in the United States, especially for young practitioners. But according to a new report by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, where you live and work as an architect can majorly affect your annual income now and in the future. Forbes recently reported on the agency’s updated Occupational and Employment Statistics data, which reveal where architects can earn top salaries. For fully-licensed architects working full-time in the field as of May 2017, these are the average incomes found within the top 5 states: New York: $109,520 Massachusettes: $103,920 Texas: $99,580 Arizona: $95,220 California: $95,060 Alaska, of all places, provides the sixth-highest average salary to practitioners, followed by Alabama, New Hampshire, West Virginia, and Minnesota. Forbes noted that if the District of Columbia were included as a state, it would rank third. Per the Occupational and Employment Statistics data, the 2017 mean annual wage for Utah, the worst state to practice architecture in terms of earnings, was $67,520. Arkansas, Maine, Idaho, and Vermont trail behind as well, offering average salaries that, when calculated altogether, hover at $70,725. In thinking about this, it’s important to consider just how many architects work in the country. According to the report, there are an estimated 103,100 architects employed in U.S. firms. California boasts the most architects with 13,880. New York has about 12,740. From there the stats drop dramatically with Texas employing 8,730, as Illinois and Florida employing 5,140 and 4,490 respectively. While these stats offer huge insights into geographical demographics, they do not break down top earnings by ethnicity, race, gender, or age. It’s no secret that even in the highest-ranking state on this list, New York, junior architects and interns—or up-and-coming designers usually under the age of 30—receive significantly less money until they earn their licensure. Even then, in some cases, those newly-minted architects aren’t given promotions or raises. It depends on the ethics and goals of firms in which they work. For women and minority architects, the reality can be just as harsh, no matter the level. Kim Dowdell, the new president of the National Organization for Minority Architects (NOMA), recently told AN that the wealth gap in the U.S. trickles so far down that young minority students are less and less likely to pursue the profession due to the cost of an architectural education. “Many of my colleagues have really high levels of student debt coupled with comparatively low professional salaries (consider doctors and lawyers) and limited flexibility and financial freedom,” she said. “How can we as an organization motivate or incentivize people to pursue architecture knowing that compensation is a challenge and the student loan debt is higher than ever?” Pay equity is arguably one of the biggest issues in the industry today. In February, The Architects’ Journal released its 2019 report on the U.K.'s gender pay gap, which unveils all documented salaries at firms that employ 250 or more people. Legally, these large-size practices must publicly reveal their gender pay gap in an effort to spread awareness on the issue. According to the article, Foster + Partners, which employs 1,061 people, includes 36 percent female architects who earn a median pay that’s 6.9 percent lower than their male counterparts. Zaha Hadid Architects has nearly the same amount of women on staff as Foster’s office, but the median pay gap is 21 percent. Arup, the global engineering and design firm, pays its female employees 16.9 percent less. Here in the U.S., where it's not a requirement to disclose firm-wide salaries, people are beginning to think more seriously about how gaps in gender, race, and pay equity may affect the internal culture of a firm and the subsequent projects produced its employees. Last summer, Jeanne Gang revealed she had closed the pay gap at Studio Gang, becoming the first firm in the country to do so. As Gang pointed out in her Fast Company article, the pay gap is one of architecture's greatest injustices and diversity in design isn’t just about filling a quota with different faces of different colors in a single office. It’s about recognizing the value that architects of all backgrounds bring to the table, and compensating them appropriately. Like any profession, the dollar amounts for an architect's salary will differ from state to state, but the respect for the mind and skills of a designer, no matter their race, gender, or language, should be the same across the board. That, according to Gang, will truly allow creativity to flourish.
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Remembering the legacy of pioneering architect David Singler

The David C. Singler Foundation was established in 1994 to promote career development and offer internships to students of color entering the architecture and design professions. The New York City–based foundation recognized that African Americans were underrepresented in the design fields and set out to address the impediments to entrance into the profession. The foundation was named after David C. Singler, an African-American architect whose own life represented these challenges—and the attempts to overcome them—that face African Americans hoping to become architects in this country. Singler, a life-long resident of Harlem, attended City College of New York (CCNY) and earned a master’s degree in architecture from Columbia before beginning a 30-year career as an architect. In 1965 Singler took the New York State licensing exam but failed the design portion of the test. Both Lewis Kwit and Jim Howie, who were colleagues of Singler and helped establish the foundation and served on its board, highlighted the unfairness of the New York system and how it systematically kept African Americans out of the profession. In New York, applicants for licensure were required to appear in person before the board and could be turned down for practice. Singler, like many young designers in New York, took the Connecticut test, which many believed was fairer and which, through reciprocity, allows one to be licensed in New York State. By all accounts, Singler was extremely talented as a designer, manager, and businessman in the profession, but because of prejudice towards African Americans, had to take lesser jobs than his skills would allow. He nevertheless had a long, successful career, beginning in the 1970s when he worked first for Western Electric and then for Nigerian entrepreneur T.I. Nwamu, planning and designing new towns in the plateaus of Nigeria. In the early 1980s he co-founded the company Construction Support Services with Jim Howie, who said that Singler was excellent at finding and completing work for their corporate clients. But in a meeting in 1992, Singler suddenly had a heart attack or stroke (no autopsy was performed) and died. The architect had made such a profound impression on his colleagues that, in 1993, several of them decided to create the foundation to honor his memory. Its mission was to help young design students of color with a mentorship program and a mechanism for placing the best students in summer internships in major offices. The foundation went to the Pratt Institute and asked Dean Sidney Shelov to forward the best African-American students to receive the internships. They then asked important professionals like Juliet Lamb, head of interiors at HOK, if she would take interns. She did, as did Perkins Eastman, Gensler, Taylor Clark Architects, and SOM. Architects Andy Jordan and Shaneekua (née Bent) Henry both received internships in this way and believed it helped them advance in their careers. Jordan, who now owns his own firm, AMPED Architecture, said that though he had a strong background as a student at Art and Design High School and did well as a student at Pratt, this experience as an intern at HOK opened up a whole new world of experiences for him. Furthermore, Juliet Lamb served as a lifelong role model and mentor, and the internship gave him the “psychological edge” to advance in the profession. Henry, an intern at SOM for three years, likewise praised the Foundation for helping her get an advantage in the workplace while she was a student at Pratt from 1995 to 1998. The Singler program lasted about six years, or until the foundation believed they were no longer getting qualified students for these important positions from Pratt. The program, which received support from Morgan Freeman, jazzman Chico Hamilton, and Mayor David Dinkins, sent many young African-American students into the workplace, including: Henry, Julio Colon, Carlyle Fraser, Jr., Celeste Lane, Lashford Lowe, Steven Morales, Damian Ponton, Joseph Warner, and Brian West. Architectural internships today are often criticized for being exploitative of young workers, but this is an example of how this foundation used this system to give people a push forward into a career.
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Architect's Newspaper is looking for editorial interns!

Calling all architecture writers! If you are interested in:
  • all things architecture, urbanism, and design
  • immersing yourself in a fast-paced publishing environment
  • seeing your byline attached to articles in print and online
  • unlimited espresso
…then you may be a good candidate to join the team at The Architect’s Newspaper as an editorial intern! AN is a national publication with a dynamic online presence, publishing breaking news, reviews, and features on what matters right now in the world of architecture, urbanism, and design. We’re looking for New York-based interns who will be available to work with our editorial staff in AN‘s Tribeca offices two days a week during the fall and winter. Ideal candidates will be strong writers with an eye for detail, game for covering breaking news, openings, and announcements, and knowledgeable on the basics of WordPress and Photoshop. Duties may also include fact checking, archival research, and photo research. Internships are paid on an hourly basis. Interested? Please send your resume/CV and three short (no more than 1,000 words each) writing samples to shong@archpaper.com.
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Editorial Internship at The Architect's Newspaper

Calling all archi-writer-types! If you are interested in: · all things architecture and design · immersing yourself in a fast-paced publishing environment · meeting top architects and designers · seeing your byline attached to articles in print and online · unlimited espresso ...then you may be a good candidate to join the team at The Architect's Newspaper as an editorial intern! AN is a national publication with regional editions and a dynamic online presence, covering breaking news, reviews, and features on what matters right now in the world of architecture and design. We're looking for New York-based interns available to work with our editorial staff in AN's Tribeca offices. Ideal candidates will be strong writers, game for covering events, lectures, and openings, and knowledgeable on the basics of Wordpress and Photoshop. Internships are paid on an hourly basis. Interested? Please send your resume/CV and three short (no more than 1,000 words each) writing samples to editor[at]archpaper.com.
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Know Your Worth: AIA launches campaign tackling the unpaid internship

The AIA's Center for Emerging Professionals has launched a new campaign that seeks to address the issue of unpaid internships. The campaign aims to inform "all generations of architects" of the significant contributions that Emerging Professionals bring to the field as well as the value of being paid a substantial amount for one's work “That’s the legacy and history of our profession—this apprenticeship," said Klimatic Architecture principal Susan Schaefer Kliman in one of two campaign videos featured below, "but just because it’s an apprenticeship and a time where you’re still learning, doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t get paid.” The campaign page provides resources such as a direct link to the Fair Labor Standards Act, the AIA Code of Ethics, and as well as information on AIA's "intern tilting page." AIA also equipped users with a Compensation Survey Salary Calculator, a tool used to provide details on compensation information by region and firm size.   https://youtu.be/9BJEwHrpGzk https://youtu.be/GIqXw-BknYk
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Five Top Firms Looking for Summer Interns

As spring rolls around, deadlines loom for coveted summer internships. AN has collected a list of five prestigious firms that are looking for their 2011 class of interns. Good luck! 1. Skidmore, Owings and Merrill LLP Deadline: April 4, 2011 SOM has designed some of the most iconic buildings of our time, from the John Hancock Center and the Sears Tower to Burj Khalifa in Dubai. Send your cover letter, resume and 5-8 work samples (8.5” x 11”) to SOM’s Human Resources Department at 14 Wall Street, 24th Floor, New York, NY 10005. Only hard copy submissions will be considered. 2. Gensler Deadline: rolling Gensler is offering several internships in architecture, interior design, marketing, graphics and planning in Dallas, Newport Beach, San Diego, LA, Denver, Houston, and Morristown, NJ offices. Most of the internships listed online are accepting students enrolled in professional degree programs only, but check the qualifications on the company’s career website. 3. Perkins+Will Deadline: April 22 for architecture internships in Atlanta and NYC, but deadlines are specific to each types of internship. Perkins+Will’s portfolio includes Chase Tower in Chicago and Antilia in Mumbai, a 27-story structure that’s one of the most expensive personal homes in the world. The firm’s paid internship program currently has five openings in interiors, architecture and urban design+landscape architecture. The internships are based out of in their Atlanta and NYC offices. Submit one complete PDF with a cover letter, resume, and up to a total of three pages of design examples no larger than 4MB through the company’s website. 4. HOK Deadline: rolling HOK has openings for summer architectural interns in its St. Louis and Chicago offices. Interns will have to opportunity to 2D and 3D presentation/design drawings, and create models/project boards for client and project team review. According to the website, the full-time summer internships are generally paid. The firm also offers a sustainable design internship program. Apply online. 5. OMA Deadline: rolling Last week, OMA announced two new internship opportunities. The Dutch firm is looking for a business development intern and a model shop intern for their Rotterdam office. They also have model shop and architectural internships available in their New York office. Internships in both departments are paid.