Posts tagged with "International":

C40: Reinventing Cities Competition

Reinventing Cities is an unprecedented global competition organized by the C40 to drive carbon neutral and resilient urban regeneration. Together 19 cities have identified 49 underutilized spaces, rapidly available for redevelopment. The initiative invites developers, architects, environmentalists and creative minds to collaborate and compete for the opportunity to transform these sites into beacons of sustainability and resiliency. The competition will serve as a model, demonstrating how the alliance between cities and business can shape the future delivering healthier, greener and economically viable urban development. How it Works: The Reinventing Cities competition helps cities identify and select the best projects to redevelop underutilized sites in cities around the world. Participating cities propose a diverse supply of land, including empty plots in new development areas, sites to densify in City centres, abandoned buildings, historical mansions, former industrial sites, underused car parks, etc... For each of these sites, the bidder teams will compete to buy or lease the site and to implement their project. Projects should address components such as energy efficiency, sustainable building materials, circular economy, water management and other components that will lead to a resilient and carbon-free development. The price won’t be the main criteria for the project selection. Supported by C40, the cities will favour bids from creative teams that deliver innovative climate solutions in combination with striking architecture and tangible benefits for the local community. An Unprecedented Competition: Beyond business as usual, Reinventing Cities targets climate-oriented project Beyond a call for ideas, Reinventing Cities targets real-life projects. It will lead to a property transfer enabling the winners to implement their project Beyond a simple design competition, Reinventing Cities targets holistic projects with innovative program, design and construction methodology Beyond frontiers, the Reinventing Cities teams will gain international exposure. They will be presented as pioneers, committed alongside Mayors to develop new models of carbon neutral and sustainable development. Reinventing Cities in Numbers:
19 participating cities 49 sites 711 ha to redevelop in total 27 sites with an area greater than 1 ha 24 empty plots to develop 14 sites to redevelop and densify 8 underused car parks to transform 9 individual existing buildings 4 patrimonial mansions & 2 markets 8 abandoned industrial sites Timeline:
December 2017:  Competition launch / Start of the 1st phase 4 May 2018: Submission of the Expression of Interest July 2018: Selection of each site’s finalist teams / Start of the 2nd phase November/December of 2018: Deadline for submission of the Final Proposals Early 2019: Selection of the winning projects / Competition closure

RESIDE: Mumbai Mixed Housing

RESIDE Rapid urban growth and growing inequality has created a global crisis in housing that increasingly segregates the rich from the poor. Though not fully understood, there is a clear and parallel relationship between the size of a city and its level of socio-economic disparity: the larger the city, the less equal it tends to be. Physical and social segregation, which both reflects and perpetuates socio-economic disparity within a city, is a growing concern in cities worldwide - including Mumbai. The long-term success of a city depends on the collective well-being of all its inhabitants. To what extent can architecture support social inclusion and break down spatial segregation within the megacity? arch out loud challenges competition entrants to design a mixed residence development on one of the last undeveloped sections of Mumbai’s coastline. Entrants will design for both the indigenous fishing community that has occupied the site for hundreds of years - as well as a new demographic drawn to the affluent neighborhood that now encompasses the site. Proposals should identify architectural and planning solutions that support integration between these socio-economically distinct communities. JURY Daniel Libeskind - Founding Principal, Studio Libeskind Norman Foster - Founder & Executive Chairman, Foster + Partners Sheila Sri Prakash - Founding Principal, Shilpa Architects Dominique Perrault - Founding Principal, Dominique Perrault Architecture Deborah Berke - Founding Partner, Deborah Berke Partners | Dean, Yale School of Arch Joshua Prince-Ramus - Founding Principal, President, REX Vishaan Chakrabarti - Founding Principal, PAU Sanjay Puri - Founding Principal, Sanjay Puri Architects Sameep Padora - Founding Principal, sP+A Romi Khosla - Founding Principal, Romi Khosla Design Studio Grace Kim  - Founding Principal, Schemata Workshop Geeta Mehta - Founding President, Asia Initiatives | Professor, Columbia University Shefali Balwani - Founding Principal, Architecture BRIO Eric Bunge - Cofounding Principal, nArchitects Yosuke Hayano - Partner/Principal, MADarchitects REWARDS Prizes total to $8,000 OVERALL WINNER - $5,000 + AO feature and certificate 3 Runners up - $1,000 each + AO feature and certificate 10 Honorable Mentions - AO feature and certificate Directors Choice - AO feature and certificate CALENDAR Advanced Registration: Dec 11 - Feb 1 Early Registration: Feb 2 - Mar 29 Regular Registration: Mar 30 - Apr 1 Submission Deadline: May 1

ASA International Design Competition: Vex Agitated Vernacular

1.DESIGN BRIEF

This year’s ASA International Design Competition aims to upend the typical associations of vernacular architecture and design. The term ‘VEX’ can be approached from a multitude of perspectives, all to challenge, or agitate, the stereotypes of what vernacular should or should not be.

One tends to assume that vernacular architecture is in opposition to modern architecture and lifestyle. There is the perception that vernacular is something that is traditional and therefore is considered to be technologically ‘inept’ or ‘crude.' This relegates vernacular design to irrelevance in today’s society and also implies that it is immutable and static, and ‘unimprovable.’

The challenge of the competition is for participants to create a new type of vernacular with characteristics not commonly associated with vernacular design. The competition is looking to showcase new vernacular design that is mutable, inventive and capable of self-renewal.

The goal is to re-think vernacular as something that can assume performative roles and possess generative potentials. The Jury will reward entrants that can demonstrate vernacular design that is dynamic and is particularly suited to innovation, invention and relevance.

VEX asks:  How can Vernacular agitate the status quo?

- Can Vernacular be a catalyst, a variable, a process, rather than a static element?

- Can Vernacular be a language from which others can spring from and use?

2. SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Each submission must include the following contents:

2.1. The participant can select any specific site as the site of their design. The subject can be architecture, urban design or interior design.

2.2.  After identifying the site, provide conceptual drawings, analytical drawings, sections, plans, renderings or perspective drawings in any scale. Demonstrate how vernacular quality modifies the subject and the resulting design outcome.

3. DELIVERABLES

3.1. Five (5) Graphic Slides: Square Format 420×420 mm each

-  High resolution PDF @ 300 dpi (maximum file size of combined 5 PDF slides: 20* MB)

-  Recommendation: font size used in the graphics should not be less than 11 pt. for

   printing clarity.

-  File name: Firstname_Lastname_300.pdf

3.2. Project Description in English, maximum 300 words

Files that do not meet the specified requirements will not be taken into consideration.

For more details on deliverables and submission process please refer to the competition website.

4. AWARDS

First prize: 4,000    USD

Second prize:  2,000    USD

Third prize: 1,000    USD

Honorable Mention: 3 x 500    USD

5. COMPETITION TIMELINE

-  Official Announcement of competition:  January 30, 2018

-  Online Submission for competition begins: January 30, 2018

-  Deadline for submissions: March 31, 2018

-  Announcement of shortlisted entries: April 15, 2018

-  Finalist Judging and Awarded entries: May 6, 2018

6. REGISTRATION & SUBMISSION

-  Registration is free.

-  Register and submit online at www.asacompetition.com

7. ELIGIBILITY TO PARTICIPATE

-  Open to students, architects, urban planners, designers, artists and thinkers.

-  Submit as an individual or as a team.

-  No restrictions on age, gender or nationality.

-  No limits on the number of submissions.

-  Work cannot be published elsewhere before.

-  Submission cannot be built work or completed projects.

-  The entrant should have legal rights and copyrights to all the material submitted.

   If the project contains any material or elements that are not owned by the entrant,

   the submission shall be excluded from any consideration.  If it is later known that

   rights have been violated, the prize and award will be recalled.

-  The copyright of the project belongs to the entrant.

-  All materials submitted may be displayed and/or published at the discretion of

   The Association of Siamese Architects under Royal Patronage.

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An exhibit explores the limits of drawing at the Austrian Cultural Forum

On February 5, the Austrian Cultural Forum New York opened the exhibition "The Projective Drawing," an exhibition inspired by architectural historian Robin Evans’ posthumous book, The Projective Cast. Evans sought to explore a new approach to our understanding of architecture, one based on the incorporation of the senses: the physical, mental and emotional. Brett Littman, the Executive Director of the Drawing Center and curator of the exhibition, described this strain of thought as “looking beyond pencil and paper to express objects” to “explore the limits of drawing.” Under this rubric, many of the drawings possess a non-linear and non-traditional character that requires thoughtful interpretation from the audience. Located in the Austrian Cultural Forum’s landmark building in Midtown Manhattan, "The Projective Drawing" is displayed in the multi-level gallery space found at the base of the building. The exhibition includes Austria-based and international artists, allowing for a broad range of ideas and representations influenced by their regional contexts. The panel hosted on the opening night of the exhibition featured Elsy Lahner, a curator of contemporary art for the Albertina Museum Vienna, Brett Littman, and exhibiting artists Lionel Favre, Brigitte Mahlknecht and Judith Saupper. Over the course of an hour, Lahner probed the curator and artists on the inspirations behind their work. For instance, Saupper spoke of her fascination with the informal geometry and architecture often found in vernacular Alpine forms, while Favre discussed his search for the hidden traditions that shape our conception of the built environment. As part of the exhibition, on February 19, the Austrian Cultural Forum will host a live performance of American percussionist Billy Martin and Austrian clarinetist Susanna Gartmayer that interprets the exhibited work of Sara Flores. "The Projective Drawing" The Austrian Cultural Forum New York , 11 E 52nd Street  Through May 13
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Getty Institute to lead Le Corbusier conservation workshops

The Getty Conservation Institute (GCI) will host a workshop series on the three—and only—museums designed by Swiss architect Le Corbusier. The series will discuss the care and keeping of Sanskar Kendra Museum and the Government Museum and Art Gallery (in Ahmedabad and Chandigarh, India, respectively), as well as the National Museum of Western Art in Tokyo. Le Corbusier’s Three Museums: A workshop on their care and conservation is part of the GCI’s ongoing Conserving Modern Architecture Initiative, which is an international program to advance the conservation of 20th century heritage, specifically modern architecture. The conservation of modern architecture presents a number of issues outside of ideological constraints. Concerns stem from material and structural decay: Keeping it Modern, a conservation grant program associated with the Conserving Modern Architecture Initiative, notes that the innovational materials and structural systems found in modern architectural heritage were often untested, leading to their poor performance over time. According to the GCI, the three museums share a number of traits such as an exposed concrete frame, thick concrete pilotis, and surrounding public plazas. All three were designed around Corbusier’s “concept of a museum of unlimited growth,” a museum plan that allowed for the future expansion of the cultural institutions. The workshops, taking place from February 4–6 in Ahmedabad and on February 8 in Chandigarh, include representatives from all three museums and the Fondation Le Corbusier. Participants will discuss the potential paths of improvement for the architectural conservation and collections management for each building. Susan Macdonald, the head of GCI Field Projects, hopes the workshops will generate a conservation network for the three related sites. The events, she explained in a press release, are an opportunity for "museum participants to consider what is significant about their respective museums as individual buildings and as part of the larger collected work of a great architect, each can better develop the necessary conservation policies to care for these significant buildings and their important collections."
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Report slams British regulatory system overseeing Grenfell

Since the June 2017 Grenfell Tower fire, the United Kingdom is attempting to come to terms with a ubiquitous feature of its urban landscape, the council-owned tower block. Built in 1974, the Grenfell Tower had recently-installed cladding meant to insulate the decades-old structure. Instead, the renovation served as an accelerant, leaping over the concrete floor plates that should effectively seal potential fires. The severity of the conflagration within a council-owned tower housing some of society’s most vulnerable raises the question of whether the British regulatory environment and construction industry facilitated such a tragedy. The Guardian reports that the ‘Independent Review of Building Regulations and Fire Safety,’ has lodged a searing indictment of Britain’s construction industry and governmental regulation of high-rises. Authored by Dame Judith Hackitt, the report describes the practices that led to the Grenfell Tower fire as being caused by a “mindset of doing things as cheaply as possible and passing on responsibility,” and the use of third-party inspections that are “open to abuse given the potential conflicts of interests, with growing levels of mutual dependence between developers and contracted inspectors.” In short, the regulatory organs tasked with insuring building safety are increasingly in collusion with the property interests they are meant to police. With more than a million people living in council-owned tower blocks, the review of British building practices and the regulation of high-density developments is imperative. As noted by The Guardian, Hackitt described the “whole system of regulation” as “not fit for purpose, leaving room for those who want to take shortcuts to do so.” Although Hackitt’s report does not provide a specific framework to address the safeguarding of the country’s council-owned tower blocks, she emphasizes the need for greater clarity within regulatory guidance documents, increased scrutiny of inspectors and developers, as well as an examination of sprinklers, escape routs, cladding and alarm systems.

Rethink the dispensing experience – Packaging design contest by Taplast on Desall.com

New packaging design contest on Desall.com: Taplast and Desall invite you to design an innovative packaging with connected dispenser for liquids, suggesting an ecological and intuitive solution, suitable for the broader public.

For more info: http://bit.ly/TaplastDesignContest

Contest timeline

Upload phase: 9th November 2017– 7th February 2018 (1.59 PM UTC)

Client Vote: from 7th February 2018

Winner announcement: approximately before the end of April 2018

Total awards

€4000

Participation is free of charge and open to all creative people (at least 18 years old).

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2014 European Solar Decathlon Announces Winners

The 2014 European Solar Decathlon has come to an end, and the international student competition to design cutting edge solar houses has produced a winner: Team Rhome of Universitá Degli Studi di Roma TRE. Their house, called Rhome for denCity, received a mark of 840.63 out of 1,000 maximum points, edging out the runner-up proposals by a slim margin. Second place went to Philéas by France's Atlantic Challenge and third place to Prêt-à-Loger by TU Delft. Philéas received a score of 839.75 points, coming in only just short of the victors and first place winners Rhome for denCity. The first place Rhome for denCity house is designed as a top floor apartment in the prototype stage that is meant to be a part of a four-story housing project. The house efficiently uses solar panels to power the house whilst relying on natural ventilation to cool its inhabitants. Its design, albeit modest, is pleasant and the house itself could serve as an outline for future sustainable houses. The European Solar Decathlon also gave out six awards for the winners of certain categories such as architecture and engineering/construction. The Dutch team TU Delft took the award for sustainability and communications with their third place entry: Prêt-à-Loger. France’s Athletic Challenge also won in the category of energy efficiency with their second place entry, Philéas.