Posts tagged with "Interiors":

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Worrell Yeung anchors a sprawling loft with two inserted volumes

New Yorkers are accustomed to living and working in tight quarters. Yet, the city has an ample offering of former industrial buildings that have been adapted into residences and offices. But as in any historic SoHo or Tribeca loft, the challenge has always been to make the best use of expansive floor plates and double-height ceilings. Introducing split-levels, rooms-within-rooms, and even segmenting these massive spaces into separate units has often done the trick, alleviating the ebbs and flows of economic pressure but also achieving a level of domestic harmony. Tasked with the renovation of a sprawling 3,200 square-foot loft in DUMBO, Brooklyn's landmarked Clocktower Building, emerging practice Worrell Yeung devised a scheme that makes use of two central volumes. Delineating open-plan rooms on either side of the full-floor apartment, these two wooden-clad inserts contain most of the apartment's amenities: bedrooms, bathrooms, closets, and a wet bar. As a hub for the space, these two Russian Doll-eques elements help frame open living space and four panoramic exposures. Opening up like a cabinet, the two white oak-paneled, vertical raked-pattern volumes conceal and reveal various elements including a "moment of pause" elevator foyer, cast in dark minimal materials and taut details. Marble accents found in this alcove carry through to the second volume's kitchen counter insert, which is extended by a perfectly flush and monolith island. The vastly more private volumes reveal intimate chambers with clever details like a semi-translucent shower wall visible in one of the bedrooms. Read the full article on our interiors and design website, aninteriormag.com.
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AN Interior takes a deep dive into the back channels of design world barter culture

The independent design scene takes care of its own. As in medieval guilds, talents band together to address pressing issues, such as copyright infringement, and share resources. These communities develop out of schools, geographic proximities, shared commercial platforms, and, perhaps most important, common interests. Within these tight-knit networks, individuals trade work and services among themselves, letting practitioners build collections while building communities. Barter culture is still going strong. “It’s out of necessity and born from a desire to live with the things you want,” Brooklyn-based designer Aiden Bowman said. “Often, when you have to ship a piece for a show or photoshoot, it becomes a lot more convenient to trade it for something else you might want, rather than pay to ship it back. It boils down to neither designer nor photographer having the funds to purchase each other’s work.” The in-kind economy extends across disciplines. Bowman and partner Josh Metersky founded object-based practice Trueing in 2016. Firmly rooted in the New York architecture and design industries, the duo has forged strong relationships with many of the city’s leading creatives. The pair’s Brooklyn apartment includes a number of works that reflect these connections, like a sconce by lighting designer Bec Brittain. “When we were a small company, we would weigh on friends to provide us with props for our first photoshoots,” said Brooklyn-based designer Nick Cope. “As collectors of art and design, we also enjoy the privilege of bartering with our friends so that we can surround ourselves with beautiful objects that we couldn’t otherwise afford.” For him and his wife, Rachel, founders of the Brooklyn-based wallpaper brand Calico, bartering is a great word-of-mouth way to drum up new business, but the duo sees it as more than just self-promotion; bartering is also a way to appreciate other talents. Bespoke Calico prints feature prominently in lighting designer Lindsey Adelman’s downtown Manhattan studio, while Adelman’s luminaires likewise appear in the Copes’ upstate weekend home, joining ceramics by BDDW and custom furnishing by Huy Bui and Ladies & Gentlemen Studio. Read the full exposé on our interiors and design website, aninteriormag.com.
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AN Interior interviews five interior and furniture design practices to watch

Every year a new class of professionals storms the scene. We sifted through the perspectives and personalities to find the five up-and-coming interior practices and designers that should be on your radar. Atelier Barda Montreal For the six studio members of Atelier Barda, architecture is an intuitive art form shaped by precedents from design and other creative practices. Many of the studio’s projects are subtly suffused with allusions to the fine arts: White tiling in the SSENSE Headquarters recalls Jean-Pierre Raynaud’s gridded installations; the Résidence Villeneuve’s storefront living space evokes Edward Hopper’s Nighthawks; and the Gauthier House takes its inspiration from the minimalism of Ellsworth Kelly and Robert Mangold—two favorites of the clients. References to art history are testaments to more than just aesthetic interest. According to studio director Kevin Botchar, Atelier Barda “works through artistic and cinematographic references because they’re part of a collective unconscious.” They may also reflect the studio’s broader effort to achieve a more enduring kind of design. As Botchar put it, “We are in search of a sort of timelessness in our projects.” NILE New York City NILE’s project is modernism, which at first seems a curious choice in 2019. But according to the New York-based firm’s founder, Nile Greenberg, the original ethos and ideas of prewar modernism can be easily applied to today’s context. “Beauty, function, and politics are all the same thing,” Greenberg told AN. “I love the Smithsons’ phrase ‘loving neutrality.’ If a space is neutral, it can be anything for anyone.” Like that of Mies and early Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, NILE’s modernism takes universal qualities and tailors them to specific people or situations, hence the word loving. Neutrality, rather than minimalism, which is frequently restrictive, allows flexibility for individuality against a background free of identity. In an age when inclusivity and openness are being advanced in all arenas of culture, NILE looks to the democratic ideals of modernism to define new ways of living in the 21st century. A veteran of MOS, SO – IL, and Leong Leong, Greenberg has completed a store for clothing retailer 6397 in downtown Manhattan and a house in Denver, and this fall two books will hit the shelves: The Advanced School of Collective Feeling, by Greenberg and Matthew Kennedy, and Two Sides of the Border, which Greenberg coedited with Tatiana Bilbao. Click through to our interiors and design website at aninteriormag.com to read all five interviews.
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L.A. practice Warren Garrett opens a sensuous Montreal atelier

For Marie-Eve Warren, cofounder of boutique firm Warren Garrett, setting up a Montreal atelier earlier this year meant returning home to her native town. She and partner Jeremy Garrett established their interior architecture practice in Los Angeles in 2003. Espousing a refined and harmonious style, the duo made a name for themselves by completing a number of high-end residential projects for Hollywood stars and professional athletes. With extensive travel experience and backgrounds in the creative environments of film, television, and fashion, they were able to infuse their approach with influences derived from international trends, cultures, and lifestyles. Tapping into Montreal's growing prominence on the international design stage but also its strategic geographic position—placing the firm is closer proximity to its projects in Europe, Africa, and North America—Warren Garrett chose the Quebecois city to open a second atelier outpost. “Montreal is an architecturally-rich, sophisticated metropolis that has managed to maintain a sense of small-town warmth and charm,” says Garrett. “It is also experiencing movement towards new high-end real estate developments and luxury environments, and our goal is to offer our insight and expertise in that arena, which has been our practice’s core-focus since our inception. We want to integrate into that movement and to help it strike a balance. Montreal is a stable platform for growth and creativity, with a hyper-creative subconscious and a plethora of inspirational individuals." Read the full article on our interiors and design website, aninteriormag.com.
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British interior design duo Fettle brings refined, yet rustic flair, to the U.S.

Combining decades of experience in the British architecture and interior decor industries, designers Andy Goodwin and Tom Parker joined forces in 2013 to form Fettle. The London and Los Angeles interior design firm primarily develops hospitality projects for a range of independent, start-up, and blue-chip clients on both sides of the Atlantic; in London, Rome, Los Angeles, Portland, and New York. Major clients have included Somerston Capital, Ennismore, Metropolitian Restaurants, Gourmet Burger Kitchen, La Brasseria, Yard Sale Pizza, The Oxford Blue, Andeva Gastronomy, Bel-Air, and Mike Robinson. Pulling from their respective expertise, Goodwin and Parker offer a full spectrum of services; everything from space planning and project feasibility studies to the design of bespoke furnishings and finishes. The duo's holistic approach ensures a seamless process from start to finish. While London-based Goodwin places emphasis on detailing, furniture and architectural ornamentation, his Los Angeles-based counterpart recognizes the importance of context; the value of using local materials and stylistic references to better situate an interior. AN Interior editor Adrian Madlener spoke to Parker about three recent U.S. projects and Fettle's particular methodology; one predicated on remitting honest, direct, functional, and site-specific results.  Read the full interview with Andy Goodwin and Tom Parker on our interiors and design site, aninteriormag.com.

GreenerBuilder 2019

Hosted by the Pacific Region communities of the U.S. Green Building Council, GreenerBuilder is a one-day conference and expo for green building professionals. The annual event unites all of the key players in greening the Pacific Region’s built environment—including architects, engineers and contractors—to discuss industry trends, new research and emerging technologies. GreenerBuilder is where you can get the strategies and tools to help create a more sustainable future in the region.

Robotic Storage Design

A new product design contest on Desall.com is now available: Pharmathek and Desall invite you to design the new case of the Sintesi robotized warehouse dedicated to the pharmacy world.

Pharmathek is looking for the new design of the case of the Sintesi robotized warehouse and of the automatic loader Pharmaload, installed inside the pharmacies and developed to facilitate the pharmacist and her/his collaborators in the daily management of the medicines and their data.

For more info: https://bit.ly/PharmathekContest

Contest timeline

Upload phase: 28th June 2019 – 03rd October 2019 (1.59 PM UTC)

Client Vote: from 03rd October 2019

Winner announcement: approximately by the end of December 2019

Total awards

€4000

Participation is free of charge and open to all creative people at least 18 years or older.

PHARMATHEK

Pharmathek is a company that designs, produces and installs robotic storage systems for pharmacies.

Born within the Th.Kohl Group, a company with a 100 years of experience in the pharmacy sector, since its foundation the company has worked to offer its customers increasingly innovative and high-performance solutions, able to respond better and better to the needs of the contemporary pharmacy.

Among the values ​behind Pharmathek solutions there are efficiency, speed and reliability.

But even before that, flexibility: the Pharmathek robotic storage systems can be configured according to the needs of the individual company.

This is why Pharmathek customers include not only pharmacies but also hospital pharmacies and medicine wholesalers.

DESALL

Desall.com is an open innovation platform dedicated to design and innovation, that offers to companies a participatory design tool involving in the creative process an international community coming from all over the world. To date Desall gathers more than 100000 creatives from over 210 countries and has collaborated with international brands like Luxottica, Whirlpool, Electrolux, ALESSI, Enel, Leroy Merlin, KINDER, Barilla, illy, Chicco, Mondadori and many more.

Thanks to the mingling of different cultural backgrounds and creative industries, the Desall community is able to provide high-quality project solutions for every product development phase requested by the client, from concept to product design, from naming to packaging.

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Yabu Pushelberg infuses Jean Georges restaurant with seafaring motif

Jean Georges's latest venture The Fulton was designed by top New York design duo Yabu Pushelberg to evoke the history of the city’s seaport. Located at Pier 17, the new restaurant is adorned in hand-painted murals by En Viu that illustrate a whimsical undersea journey. This theme is carried through a refined use of plush sea-foam green banquettes and U-shaped quartz countertops. The overall scheme, evident throughout the two-story restaurant, veers in the opposite direction of what could easily become kitsch, especially when dealing with nautical treatments. Rather, the design of The Fulton demonstrates a mastery of elegant and restrained interpretation. Dock-floor patterns, wood paneling, and asymmetrical lighting play on the buoyancy of the waterline outside as indoor and outdoor seating provide unobstructed views of the Brooklyn Bridge. Read the full article on our interiors and design website, aninteriormag.com.
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Designers transform fairground into Quebec City's Le Grand Marché

A "glass palace" once again, Quebec City’s former Pavillon du Commerce—first erected in 1923—returns to its former glory as the Canadian city’s new public food market. The locale once hosted agricultural fairs intended to educated and promote the best farming practices. It will now help support the region's thriving agro-food sector and foster a growing culinary scene. Helmed by the ExpoCité initiative and Coopérative des Horticulteurs de Québec (CHQ) government agency, the recently completed Grand Marché hall is part of a larger urban renewal project slated to revive the Port of Quebec district. Read the full story on our interiors and design site, aninteriormag.com.
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Inaba Williams right-sizes a Williamsburg apartment

“Sometimes what’s available on the market doesn’t meet the desires of the people who want to purchase,” architect Jeffrey Inaba explains as he describes the impetus behind an Inaba Williams–designed project in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, where the firm set about reducing the number of bedrooms in what was once a two-bedroom unit.

The project, Inaba continued, represents a rare example of “lowering a home’s market value to increase its enjoyment value,” and came partially out of a desire to fix some of the bad architecture resulting from the spreadsheet-driven design of the 15-year-old developer tower where the apartment is located.

Read the full article on our interiors and design site, aninteriormag.com.
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Vincent Van Duysen converts Antwerp convent into boutique hotel

Famous for his minimalistic and at times brutalist aesthetic, Belgian architect Vincent Van Duysen espouses a refined yet textured design vocabulary. Whether developing a new product, interior, or full architecture project, the creative polymath seeks out pure yet tactile materials that, combined together, can achieve a timeless quality. Beneath the surface, Van Duysen's craft-led methodology allows him and his team to treat each new assignment with a tabula rasa approach; taking into account context, history, and the physical experience of the user. Considerations of durability, luminosity, and comfort are also crucial to his practice. Van Duysen's highly-luxurious projects can be found in retail, hospitality, workspace, and private spaces throughout Belgium and Europe. A few are located in the United States. Read the full story on our interiors and design site, aninteriormag.com.
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bld.us designs paean to sustainable materials in the seat of American democracy

Like the famous Philip Johnson project that its name riffs on, the Grass House is all about transparency—but not the superficial, paranoid kind that relies on open floor plans and full-height glass windows. “This building is really about being as transparent with the construction process, with the material selection process, with the design process, as possible,” said Andrew Linn, cofounder of bld.us, the Washington, D.C.–based practice behind the house, “even if that leads to darker, rougher spaces than typical.” The house doesn’t present a frictionless, techno-utopian vision of sustainable design, but instead celebrates the texture and tactile richness of its organic constituent materials. Read the full article on our interiors and design website, aninteriormag.com.