Posts tagged with "interiors":

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viaARCHITECTURE brings joy to a small office in Lower Manhattan

There are good clients and then there are good clients with great projects. They don’t always go together, but when they do, the result can be inspiring architecture and design. viaARCHITECTURE, the New York City firm led by Frederick Biehle and Erika Hinrichs, found both when they were commissioned to design the New York offices for Creative Capital. The nonprofit began as a project to “reinvent cultural philanthropy and to support innovative artists pursuing adventurous projects in all disciplines.” It was founded in response to the National Endowment for the Arts' abandonment of support for individual artists, and the nonprofit is proud to claim “a fierce commitment to freedom of expression.” In the last few years, they have supported artists as diverse as Meredith Monk, Laura Poitras, and Rebecca Solnit, among many others. Biehle was excited to design the group's office space and produced a working environment that is a thrill for its 20 daily inhabitants and any additional visitors. The organization's office is in a typical cramped New York site on Maiden Lane near Wall Street on the 18th-floor. But the architects were able to open up the space and emphasize the view out through a number of tall windows. The 5,000-square-foot space is further enhanced by exposed concrete floors and ceilings with stripped-down beams and columns all focused on the view out to the street and sky. In addition, the office design, which emphasizes communal, co-working spaces instead of individual work rooms, have space-saving pocket doors and multiple openings to increase spatial adaptability and visual access. The space feels open and light-filled despite its less than desirable dimensions. Visitors to Creative Capital exit a small elevator and turn into a narrow hallway, where they are greeted by a colorful double-wide sliding metal door that pulls one into the space. It is hard to convey how the architects' color palette has created an entirely joyful work environment for its employees, something that is not always the case in narrow Lower Manhattan work spaces. It should be noted that the architects worked with their clients to produce not only a desirable work environment but also one that was affordable for the nonprofit. The construction fees for the office were integrated into the ten-year lease plan, and the architects produced efficient built-in furniture and the rest is discounted Herman Miller task furniture for the remainder of the space. This commission was a special one for the architects and produced a project that improved the daily work experience for its users. It’s a case study in what architects can do to improve everyone’s lives.
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The most popular interior design projects of 2017

As we continue to evolve our AN Interior magazine (don’t miss it on newsstands if you haven’t already gotten your copy!), we are discovering more and more amazing architectural interiors. Here are a few showstoppers that you, our readers, couldn't stop checking out this year. (See the rest of our Year in Review 2017 articles here.) Pedro&Juana’s Ana Paula Ruiz Galindo and Mecky Reuss show off their new apartment in Mexico City In all of their projects, Ana Paula Ruiz Galindo and Mecky Reuss, of Mexico City–based Pedro&Juana furnish public areas with furniture of their own design, imbuing utilitarian spaces with a joyful energy and effervescent wit. Those sensibilities—and some of those furniture pieces—are fully realized throughout the pair’s recently renovated, 1,200-square-foot Mexico City apartment. Home Studios brings luminous art nouveau to a Brooklyn cocktail bar A certain type of Brooklynite has, in the past five years, done at least one of the following: lined up for pizza at Paulie Gee’s; caught a movie at Syndicated; and raced to happy hour at Ramona, Sisters, or Manhattan Inn. Even if none of those names ring a bell, chances are, if you’ve been out and about anywhere in North Brooklyn, then you’re already familiar with Home Studios, the firm behind these and Elsa, their newest addition to the Brooklyn bar scene. Home Studios designed Elsa’s light fixtures, doors, banquettes, tables, shelving for the bottles behind the bar, cocktail tables, and stools—with much of the work completed in its in-house shop. It’s all in a day’s work for the firm, which specializes in highly customized interiors. Striking gold accents fill Dallas’s Houndstooth Coffee and Jettison Cocktail Bar Dallas-based OFFICIAL transformed a 2,100-square-foot space into a day-to-evening cafe-bar whose design cements the brand of a well-loved Texas coffee shop. The bar’s lower ceilings are punctuated by a celestial gold-painted and trussed cavity that releases just the right amount of mood lighting into the space while providing clever coverage for the HVAC system. Custom fabrication shapes the space top-to-bottom: The perf wall light next to the bar was designed and fabricated locally by Mark and Amy Wynne Leveno, OFFICIAL’s cofounding principals. West of West brings an ethereal lighting scheme to this Dallas optical shop The architects at West of West brought Golden State cool to the latest retail outpost of Garrett Leight California Optical in Dallas, Texas. For the sunshiny space, founding principals Jai Kumaran and Clayton Taylor looked to nature and James Turrell’s luminous work. You don’t need 20/20 vision to see the beauty of this inspiration. Here, in their fifth store for the company, the Los Angeles and Portland–based firm crafted a calm ceiling “cloud” that orients the crisp space from above.“The interior of the store was inspired by conditions found in nature and then abstracted, condensed, and refined,” Kumaran said. “By manipulating light and volume an immersive spatial experience is created that separates this store from its suburban surroundings.” Philippe Starck designs a surreal nautical interior for Miami’s Bazaar Mar The 7,200-square-foot Bazaar Mar in Miami’s SLS Brickell is composed of two dining rooms and a raw bar materially connected by more than 6,000 hand-painted tiles featuring the drawings of artist Sergio Mora and manufactured in Spain by Cerámica Artística San Ginés. The azulejo tilework, painted in a Delft Blue pastiche typical of 16th-century Dutch pottery, completely covers the walls and ceiling. The murals are ornamented with gilded crustaceans and cabaret-style mermaids that dissolve otherwise-solid walls into surrealist other worlds. Likenesses of people involved in the project, including Chef Andrés, appear throughout the murals. The furnishings include smooth marble-topped tables, upholstered love seats, and stark white wooden chairs, creating an evocative atmosphere from which the maritime narrative emerges. Kayak office’s takes flight with an aeronautical design When Beinfield Architecture set out to create a new headquarters for travel search engine Kayak, it turned out that client and architect both had movement on the brain. The resulting headquarters is in a formerly abandoned police station designed by Yale University architect James Gamble Rogers. Kayak envisioned the patinaed headquarters containing not only top-notch collaborative offices, but also an awesome accent piece: a full-scale section of a vintage airplane fuselage that would symbolize the company’s airline-travel focus. The historic building’s nature precluded altering the structure physically, so the 20-by-30-foot fuselage couldn’t be dropped in as was originally planned. Instead, Beinfield constructed a replica within the building from new components.
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IKEA recreates war-torn Syrian house inside Norwegian flagship store

Swedish furniture purveyor IKEA is usually synonymous with picture-perfect homes filled with flat-pack designs. At its flagship store in Slependen, Norway, however, a showroom space—where the best model interiors are usually on display—is instead showcasing a dwelling straight from Syria. Working with the Norwegian Red Cross foundation, IKEA has reproduced a war-torn Syrian house. Called 25m^2 Syria, the installation features bare concrete masonry units and a space bereft of any notable furnishings, let alone any from the likes of IKEA. (For those wondering, 25 square meters equates to 269 square feet). 25m^2 is based on a real-life house on the outskirts of Damascus, the capital of the war-torn state. The apartment in Syria belongs to a woman named Rana and her family of nine, of whom pictures can be found on the walls inside. Despite its jarring effect in the store, some of IKEA brand identity can be found inside 25m^2. Typical IKEA tags that usually display prices and product information here tell stories of Rana and her family. They shed light on the Syrian way of life and the daily struggles many Syrians endure such as food and medication shortages and lack of access to clean water. The concept was initially brought to life by Norwegian advertising agency POL. Through the installation, the company hopes to raise money for "TV-Aksjonen," an effort with the Norwegian Red Cross to collect donations to aid those living in war zones. An explicit plea for donations is also written on the walls of the mock-Syrian space. In a statement POL said:
It was important to get the public involved, and to really understand where the help was going. So the decision to build a replica of a Syrian home at IKEA was made. IKEA’s vision is ‘to create a better everyday life for the may people’. So this partnership was both natural, giving and especially relevant for the cause.
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Chicago’s first Aesop store uses ten thousand reclaimed bricks

Chicago and New York–based firm Norman Kelley recently finished Chicago’s first Aesop store. The high-end Australian skin care company frequently hires young architecture firms to design their stores, and Norman Kelley’s iteration takes its cues from the surrounding historic Bucktown neighborhood.

Consisting of ten thousand reclaimed Chicago common bricks, the floor and walls are clad in intricately woven herringbone and pinwheel brick bond patterns. In order to hold the weight of the all-brick interior, the floor of the structure was reinforced from the basement. An unused chimney was removed to create a completely open floorplan. In the center of the space, a black-stained white oak counter and a demonstration island are the only furniture in the space, keeping the focus on the black steel-clad shelves, embedded in the brick walls, holding Aesop’s famed soaps and lotions.

Norman Kelley has also recently finished a second Aesop store in Tribeca, New York.

1653 North Damen Avenue Chicago, IL Tel: 872-802-4626

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A smart Manhattan office design fits three companies into one space

New York City is one of the most expensive global cities for office space, along with London, Hong Kong, Beijing, and Shanghai. According to data from real estate firm JLL, the average cost of office space per square foot in New York for 2015 was $171. So it is no wonder that companies are turning to innovative ways to rethink where and how they work.

A midtown Manhattan office interior unites three companies—America’s Kids, Gindi Capital, and Mad Projects Industries—across 15,000 square feet to make the most of this precious commodity. (The three companies are leasing the space as one entity.) New York–based architecture firm Only If — was tasked with creating a balanced range of spaces: Half of the space is dedicated to interactive and open space, while the other half to more closed areas for focused work. At one end, toward the right of the lobby, is Gindi Capital and at the other end is Mad Projects with America’s Kids housed in a space near the middle. Among the three companies, there are open work areas and private offices, conference rooms, a studio, a showroom, as well as a lobby, lounges, and a kitchen.

“The three companies, which range from fashion to real estate, had different and often conflicting requirements, but we mainly interfaced with Mad Projects. Mad Projects supported our work but also pushed us further in a way that was truly collaborative,” explained Adam Frampton, principal of Only If —. “During the design process, we were often in a position of mediating and resolving the conflicts between companies that, given their different operations, by definition, had very different needs and visions for what their office should be. Aspects of the design brief were totally contradictory.”

Only If — focused on a simple palette of black and white to help tie the spaces together. “At first, given that each business is very different and relatively independent, we considered expressing differences throughout the entire space as different zones,” said Frampton. “The monochromatic approach provides a relatively neutral background. It doesn’t look overdesigned, and it doesn’t look like the so-called contemporary creative office where one finds tech startups or coworking spaces. As an architect, it’s the kind of space I’d like to work in.”

The firm also employed a range of materials to help break up the space and introduce variety. There are wood, felt, stone, glass, and mirrors that cloak the plus-sign-shaped clothing display and storage module in Mad’s showroom. “The perpendicular and parallel relationships between mirrored surfaces create cascading visual effects,” said Frampton. The mirrored module also helps to divide the showroom into separate display areas.

The firm started working on the project in summer 2014. The clients moved in March 2015, and the interior was finished by fall 2015. “Within an accelerated schedule, a lot of the design also happened while the project was already under construction,” said Frampton. “Technically, the black, seamless floor was also quite challenging to achieve. It’s a poured resilient polyurethane, and because the building was originally two separate buildings, there are different subfloor conditions that had to also be constructed.”

The midtown office project gave Only If—an opportunity to think more deeply about the next wave of office interiors. “The project allowed us to speculate on what we think the future of the creative workplace will be,” said Frampton. 


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Jeanne Gang’s Vista tower in Chicago unveils interior design plans

Since Jeanne Gang's supertall Vista tower first appeared in 2014, numerous design alterations have taken place. However, the project has maintained its original form: a series of simple stacked volumes inspired by a frustum—a naturally-occurring crystal formation that resembles a pyramid with its top cut off. As the $950 million project develops, luxury interior renderings have been released showcasing some of the spectacular views the Chicago tower will have to offer. The skyscraper is staggered into three volumes that will reach 46, 70 and 95 stories, the tallest rising to 1,140 feet. As a result, the Vista tower is set to be the city’s third tallest building in the Lakeshore East neighborhood. California-based interiors firm Hirsch Bedner Associates (HBA) are behind the project's 406 luxury condos, none of which come cheap. A two-story penthouse apartment is may set clients back up to $17.1 million. The project is due to break ground later this year, with completion set for 2020. The mixed-use project will include retail and a hotel. Chicago developers, Magellan have already set up an inquiries page on the tower's website, where 360 degree window views can be found. https://vimeo.com/139190710
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San Francisco seeking enhanced landmark protection for one of Frank Lloyd Wright’s most significant works

A gestural ramp takes visitors to the upper stories, passing objets d'art nested into built-in niches. A bubbled skylight lets the sun's rays penetrate into an expansive atrium, even on cloudy days. The AIA says the landmarked building is one of Frank Lloyd Wright's 17 essential works. The Guggenheim? Not so much. Wright's only San Francisco building, a city landmark since 1974, sits on Maiden Lane, a quiet side street downtown. The last tenant, Xanadu Gallery, closed up shop last year. Before the next tenant moves in, preservationists are rallying to expand existing landmark protections to include parts of the interior that date to 1948, including the ceiling, a skylit plane comprised of 120 acrylic domes, mahogany display cabinets, and a brass hanging planter. Wright designed the project, one of his only renovations of an existing building, in 1948 for V.C. and Lillian Morris. The couple had a shop on the same street and had previously commissioned Wright to design four houses for them (none were built). The space became the home of the V.C. Morris Gift Shop. Although the exterior, whose arch could be a subtle tribute to Louis Sullivan, is elegant, Wright experts concede that the interior is more architecturally significant. 140 Maiden Lane was a real-world test for the Guggenheim, built in 1959, which Wright conceptualized sixteen years earlier. The skylight hints at Wright's later work, like the 1961 Marin County Civic Center. The Prairie-style homes Wright completed in the Chicago suburbs are echoed in the masonry cliff, muses John King, The San Francisco Chronicle’s urban design critic. When Xanadu Gallery moved into the space in 1997, the owners, Raymond and Marsha Handley, restored many of the interior details that were left to languish in the basement. They consulted preservation experts, including Aaron Green, who with Wright collaborated on the Marin Civic Center. Marsha feels confident that the new owner, a Hong Kong–based investor who also owns Los Angeles's Bradbury Building, will be mindful of this building's significance. It's rumored that the new tenant may be a restaurant, or a European clothing boutique. City Planners have broached the bid for elevated landmark status with the owner's representatives, as they intend to send the revised landmark designation to the Planning Commission and Board of Supervisors in the next few months.
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The scaffolding comes off Carmel Place, New York’s first modular micro-apartment building

The scaffolding just came off of Carmel Place, the 10-story, 55-unit micro-apartment building designed by Brooklyn-based nARCHITECTS. The project, formerly known as My Micro NY, has diminutive units designed to serve the "small household population." The project sits at One Mount Carmel Place, a looping side street boxed in between 28th Street, First Avenue, 27th Street, and Second Avenue in Kips Bay, Manhattan. The towers are vertically striped in four shades of grey brick (as seen in the renderings below), though in some of Field Condition's photographs the brick takes on a brownish hue. The tower is constructed of 92 modular units, which were themselves built in the Brooklyn Navy Yard. The massing somewhat reference's BIG's Two World Trade Center, whose irregularly stacked upper stores are smaller-but-wider to accommodate terraces. The interiors are meant to make the Lilliputian apartments feel as spacious as possible. The ceilings are nine-and-a-half feet tall, and exterior doors slide, rather than swing. Seventy cubic feet of storage spaces over the bathrooms and 70-square-foot kitchens with extra fold-out counter space reduce clutter and allow for full scale movement in the space. Juliet balconies, with a comparatively generous 63 square feet of floor area, allow access to the outdoors. Each of the six different types of units, ranging in size from 273 to 360 square feet, come equipped with interior furnishings. The architects collaborated with New York–based Resource Furniture on the built-ins (like the bed-couch), and other furnishings from Stage 3 Properties through Ollie. Ollie decorates rental apartments, organizes community events in-building, and offers amenities packages that include housekeeping and wifi. Carmel Place offers a standard range of amenities: bike storage, lounge, fitness room, public roof terrace, and community room. 525 square feet of ground-floor retail, plus the glassed-in, street-facing gym, anchors the development to the outside. Here as everywhere, competition for the building's affordable units is intense, with 60,000 applications submitted for the 14 apartments. All tenants could be moving in as early as March 2016.  
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Kevin Roche’s late modern interiors at the Ambassador Grill may be demolished

Kevin Roche's late modern interiors at the United Nations Plaza Ambassador Grill & Lounge, and Hotel Lobby are in jeopardy. Millennium Hotels and Resorts, the owners 0f ONE UN New York Hotel (the space's current name) have closed both spaces for possible demolition. Docomomo US, the leading modern architecture preservation group, has filed a Request for Evaluation (RFE) with the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) to grant the UN Plaza Ambassador Grill and Lounge and Hotel Lobby New York City Interior Landmark status. The interiors, states Docomomo, are strong examples of New York City late modernism. Roche designed the space with his partner John Dinkeloo (as Kevin Roche John Dinkeloo & Associates) for the United Nation Development Corporation. The UN Plaza Hotel and Office Building was completed in 1975 and Two UN Plaza was completed in 1983. Sherman McCoy would feel at home beneath the octagonal glass atriums, walls of mirrors, inset light fixtures, sharp geometric motifs, a sumptuous color palette, and a trompe l’oeil faux-skylight contribute to the luxe design. Millennium Hotels and Resorts has begun exploratory work—without permits—on the project, removing sections of the metal paneled drop ceiling that reveal the sprinkler system. Haphazard work, Docomomo claims, could irreparably damage the interior. Docomomo is asking its network of preservationists and others concerned about Roche's interior to write to the LPC to request an emergency hearing.
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Product> Glass as Art: Five Decorative Glass Masterpieces

Designers can enhance the look of any interior environment by incorporating expressive and unique decorative glass into the mix. From printed patterns to colorful and bold layers, decorative glass helps transform interior spaces into well-outfitted works of art. Cipher, Overlay, Check Skyline Design The three patterns in this collection are characterized by repeating, layered motifs in colors printed on both sides of the glass. The images can be executed in a variety of techniques, in opaque, translucent, and transparent options, allowing for different degrees of translucency and privacy. Designed by Patricia Urquiola. Alice General Glass Using direct-to-glass printing technology, patterns can be scaled and colored to spec for interior and exterior applications. Alight Pulp Studio Alight is not just a bas-relief glass product, but can be specified as a fully engineered wall system, inclusive of structural steel and other components. Created by Amses Cosma Studio. Expressions Collection Pittsburgh Corning The Expressions Collection enhances the cosmetic appeal of traditional glass block without compromising its functional benefits of security, privacy, light transmission, and fire ratings. A variety of stock images and murals are printed on eight- by eight-inch by four-inch nominal size glass block in the Decora pattern; custom design services are also offered. Wire In Glass Rudy Art Glass A variety of metal meshes are laminated into a range of textured and tinted glass, resulting in an unusually expressive collection.
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Product> Rose-Colored Glasses: Innovative Glass Comes in New Colors and Textures

Decorative glass is making a comeback in a big way thanks to new technologies that take patterns, textures, and colors to the next level. From watercolor prints to trippy, LED illuminated panels and graphic etchings; there are updated options for every room. Painterly Collection 3form Original hand-painted compositions are photographed and encapsulated into the Infinite Glass material. The collection comprises five designs in five complementary colorways. C1 Collection Carvart Taking hand-drawn lines as inspiration, these 12 geometric patterns are available in small and large scales, positive and negative designs, and single- and double-sided etched formats. Designed by Ferreira Design Company. Sizzle Stix Bullseye Glass Thin strips of dichroic glass form an eye-catching accent when set into a field of plain material. Available in two widths. Willow Nathan Allan Glass Studios A kiln-formed patterned glass that is texture-free, Willow is equally sinuous and structured. It is available tempered or laminated, and comes in several tints and colors. Illuminated Art Glass liquidoranges STUDIO These panels are created using two layers of low-iron PPG Starphire glass laminated with a high-resolution artwork interlayer. The edges are polished and the panels are face-mounted to aluminum frames and backlit with dimmable Fawoo Lumisheet LED panels. Isola Murano Glass Soli The rich colors and intricate patterns of authentic, handmade Murano glass can be combined into one-of-a-kind architectural installations.
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2015 Best of Products Awards> Finishes + Surfaces and Interiors + Furnishings

On a hot day in June, a jury convened to review nearly 400 entries to The Architect’s Newspaper's first Best of Products competition. Submissions, divided over eight categories, abounded in new materials and exciting technologies, provoking a lively dialogue during the evaluation process. Colin Brice of Mapos, Barry Goralnick of Barry Goralnick Architects, Harshad Pillai of Fogarty Finger Architecture, and architect Alison Spear generously contributed their considerable expertise and insight to the judging. While the complete roster of winners can be found in our just-published print edition, AN will be publishing the results daily over the next week. Today’s categories, Finishes + Surfaces and Interiors + Furnishings, evidenced a trend toward dramatic design. FINISHES + SURFACES Winner Raw Concrete 4004 Caesarstone This surfacing material emulates the raw look and texture of concrete, while providing the durability of quartz. The non-porous slabs are heat-, stain-, and scratch-resistant, and require no sealing. Suitable for use as countertops, vanities, flooring, wall paneling, furniture, and more, the 56 1/2-inch by 120-inch panels are available in three colors and in fourteen edge treatments. Honorable Mention ViviGraphix Spectra Glass with Zoom Images Forms+Surfaces ViviGraphix Spectra Glass consists of a graphic interlayer laminated between two panes of glass. Zoom Images, a portfolio of nature-themed photography, significantly expands the possibilities for bringing beauty to large-scale glass applications. Created using sophisticated gigapixel image-capturing equipment, Zoom Images are thousands of individual photographs that are stitched and stacked together to form a single large-scale, super-high-resolution photo. Because of their extraordinary scale, the images are able to retain their clarity at very large sizes. Zoom Images are accessible through Zoom Digital Darkroom, the manufacturer’s interactive online design tool. Honorable Mention Gyptone BIG Curve CertainTeed Ceilings These perforated acoustical gypsum panels can be formed into highly curved ceilings without the cost and time associated with custom fabrication. At only 6.5 mm thick, Gyptone BIG Curve can be dry-bent to a 10-foot radius, and can achieve up to a 5-foot radius by wet bending. The panels are made of 85 percent recycled content and certified for low-VOC emissions, which contributes to sustainable building standards and helps maintain high indoor air quality. Fitted with an acoustical backing tissue, the panels are available in three perforation patterns. INTERIORS + FURNISHINGS Winner Ikaros Koleksiyon Designed for the modern mobile worker, this sofa features cleverly designed “wings” that neatly create horizontal work surfaces on three sides of the piece. The extension off the backrest is at table height, so it can be used as a desk by a person seated in a chair behind the sofa. This aspect of the design allows Ikaros to be used simultaneously from inside and outside, providing people with an inviting and inventive locus point for collaborative work. Designed by Koray Malhan. Honorable Mention Allstar Vitra Allstar contains the all the functional features of an office chair—a synchronized mechanism with lockable positioning, seat depth and height adjustment, and an adjustable backrest—in a design that suggests a relaxed, residential feel and sense of familiarity. The chair comes in a variety of colors and fabrics; leather upholstery is available. Designed by Konstantin Grcic. Honorable Mention Parti Ceilings Plus Parti utilizes complex, continuous perforation patterns that extend beyond the boundaries of individual ceiling and wall panels to give the illusion of depth to two-dimensional surfaces. Integrated LED lighting is optional; mechanical, electrical, plumbing, and other building systems are readily accommodated by Parti.