Posts tagged with "Installations":

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Artist Creates Amazing Breathing Wall From Trash Bags

Artist Nils Völker has created a breathing wall comprised of trash bags and cooling fans. One Hundred and Eight selectively inflates a grid of, you guessed it, 108 bags to create a strikingly simple yet poetic result.  The softness of the trash bags rising and falling is really something to see. The installation can also interact with the viewer, sensing a person's presence before the wall.  From the artist:
Although each plastic bag is mounted stationary the sequences of inflation and deflation create the impression of lively and moving creatures which waft slowly around like a shoal. But as soon a viewer comes close it instantly reacts by drawing back and tentatively following the movements of the observer. As long as he remains in a certain area in front of the installation it dynamically reacts to the viewers motion. As soon it does no longer detect someone close it reorganizes itself after a while and gently restarts wobbling around.
Can you imagine this idea translated to the scale of architecture? Cloud-like hallways - or even full facades - might actively follow passers by with a gently inflating and deflating rhythm. [ Via Today and Tomorrow. ]
Interactive version: More footage of the installation:
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Night Lights on the Schuylkill

An array of glowing orbs has descended on Philadelphia's Schuylkill River to interact with curious passers-by.  Light Drift, a temporary installation by Meejin Yoon and Eric Höweler of MY Studio, will pulse blue and green on land and just off shore through Sunday, October 17. Each glowing orb has been outfitted with LED lights and electronic devices that allow communication across the glowing system and engagement with onlookers.  Sensors on land detect a person's presence, changing the color of orbs floating in the river.  From the City of Philadelphia's Mural Arts Program:
"As viewers engage and occupy the orbs along the park, the grid of lights in the water becomes an index of the activities on land. Multiple viewers can create intersections of linear patterns, encouraging viewers to “play” with each other. These orbs bring the community together by providing gathering spaces for watching the river turn into a flickering constellation, creating new connections on the river’s edge. "Light Drift creates an atmosphere, a field of lights that transform in color and intensity based on the public interaction with it. The resting state of the field is a constant state of green. When a visitor approaches a land orb, the orb will start an “enticement mode” by pulsing between blue and green. If a visitor sits on the orb, the pulsing will transition to a blue state. The water orbs that align with the land orb will change colors at the same time, creating a linear extension of blue lights in the water. Because the orbs are arranged on a diagonal grid, the lines of lit orbs will form a series of intersecting lines in the field. The intersection of lines of lit orbs in the water will encourage different people interacting with the orbs to also interact with each other."
An opening reception takes place tonight at 6:30 on the Schuylkill Riverbank between Market and Chestnut Streets.  When the temporary installation wraps up Sunday, it could move to Boston's Charles River.  Ultimately the non-toxic PETG (Polyethylene Terephthalate Glycol) shells will be recycled. Look for more information about the Light Drift installation in next week's The Architect's Newspaper.
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Bring to Light Fest Shines on Brooklyn

If New York is the city that never sleeps, how come it took us so long to get around to hosting our own Nuit Blanche (French for "Sleepless Night")? The global all-night festival of arts began in Paris, Berlin, and St. Petersburg way back in 1997, and has spread around the world in the years since. This Saturday, October 2, starting at 7:00 p.m., Brooklyn will host our city's first Nuit Blanche, rechristened "Bring to Light" by local organizers DoTank:Brooklyn and producers Furnace Media. Over 50 artists and performers will converge on Greenpoint's Oak St. between Franklin St. and the East River, taking over street corners, galleries, vacant lots, and rooftops to showcase their work. Although the range of media is broad -- some visual, some performative, some interactive -- the common threads running through them are light and sound. Among the highlights are Kant Smith's Small Explosion, a fiery cloud, a trompe-l'oeuil oil painting brought to life with rear illumination. Roselyn Anderson's Giant Puppet in His Natural Habitat is an installation comprising a giant puppet, three sculptures of illuminated meat, and a fluttering crowd of animatronic birds. And for ten percussive minutes, Tom Peyton enlists the help of a dozen drummers to turn Oak Street's scaffolding into a musical instrument. The event is free and open to the public; more info here.
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Acconci Gets In on the Ground Floor

What do kitchen counter tops, shower-wall cladding, and the Grand Concourse have in common? Corian, of course. Thanks to performance-artist-turned-designer (and Bronx native) Vito Acconci and Acconci Studio designers Adam Jakubowski and Bradley Rothenberg, the Bronx Museum can now boast its very own DuPont fabricated sculpture. Acconci’s large, porous installation is titled Lobby-For-The-Time-Being and provides an imaginative, fabric-like reconsideration of the now ubiquitous polymer, originally developed in 1967 to replace human bones. In what seems like the most recent installment in a worldwide series of Corian-centric, site-specific sculpture, Lobby-For-The-Time-Being incorporates seating (take that Philadelphia), as well as lighting and projections by Taylor Levy and Che-Wei Wang. Technically, Acconci’s first foray into architecture was way back in 1971, the year the Bronx Museum opened. Though it’s unlikely anyone remembers Seedbed for its central wooden structure...
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Burning Man Architecture Amazes

Proving our theory that the best architecture these days is installation architecture, the work on display this year at Burning Man is blowing us away. The theme this year is Metropolis: The Art of Cities, making for some even more inspired (and, of course out there..) art/architecture installations, which include: Future's Past, by Kate Raudenbush. The angular black steel "roots" of this installation resemble computer circuitry in the shape of a stepped pyramid. Above them the artist has created a bronze-colored Bodhi tree, representing the triumph of nature over modern consumption. Aeolian Pyrophonic Hall & Whispering Wall,  by Capra J'neva. A sound installation incorporating a wind harp, fire organ, and the voices of those at Burning Man, the hall wraps Burning Man "citizens" in dappled sunlight during the daytime, shadowy effects at night and surrounds them with sounds evocative of the desert. Mant Farm, by the Sober Free Society, Seattle, WA. The Mant Farm is an immersive  vertical maze; a.k.a. a working ant farm built to human scale. Minaret, by Bryan Tedrick, Glen Ellen, CA. A 50 foot tower that can be scaled externally to the midpoint, then entered into and climbed to the top. A latticed stainless steel dome on top allows people to see out without the danger of falling.The tower, built out of steel and redwood, is built in 6 sections. The bottom 3 were built like a lion's vertebrae. The upper 3 sections are painted to resemble snake skin and are smooth to discourage more climbing. An interior access portal allows people to climb up to the dome. Spire of Fire, by Steve Atkins and Eric Smith, Reno, NV. The Spire of Fire, a 48-ft blend of steel, fire, and light, is designed to "reflect the evolution of modern metropolitan architecture." At night it will feature brightly colored lights and bursts of rhythmic flame reflected off of stainless steel. Syzygryd, by Interpretive Arson, False Profit Labs, and GAFFTA, Oakland, CA.  A town square for the collaborative creation of music. According to its creators, it's "a public space, it's a sculpture, and it's a musical instrument." Temple of Flux, by Rebecca Anders, Jessica Hobbs, Peter Kimelman and Crew, Berkeley, CA.  The Temple of Flux, according to its creators, stands as a "counter-monument," made of hundreds of thin timber members arcing into the air. Zark! by Quentin Davis, Bala Cynwyd, PA. This sculpture appears to be a huge caterpillar at a distance, glowing in the darkness. Inside this organic architecture, participants will find a miniature "ruin" of playa mud brick buildings. Megatropolis. A city skyline of six buildings that will cover 5,000 square feet within a Satellite City that Covers 15,000 square feet. Helix Spire, by Eric Remash. Everday materials form a 28 foot tall helix-shaped "climbing toy." Chapel of Love by Lisa Tayebi
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New York designers Nicing, Icing stalled sites

Construction may not be expected to pick up until next year, but the city is already prepping for it with the UrbanCanvas program, for which registration closes Monday. The Department of Buildings and Department of Cultural Affairs are seeking out designers and artists to create new scaffolding, fencing, and other otherwise unsightly construction protections, of which there are nearly 1 million linear feet. If that's not enough, ArtBridge, a Chelsea non-profit, is pursuing a similar program, albeit just with the overhead scaffolding—which are also due for a redesign—though ArtBridge submissions are due tomorrow, so get cracking. And should you be not a designer but a building, or more accurately empty lot, owner looking an alternative way to dress up your site, consider Woods Bagot's Icebergs. As the firm describes them:
The design uses a modular and reusable steel frame, wrapped in translucent polycarbonate panels at grade and topped by infl ated pillows of super-lightweight ETFE (ethylene tetrafluoroethylene). One-tenth the weight of a conventional taxpayer building and able to be erected and dismantled in days, Icebergs deliver speed to market, reduce labor costs, and minimize future development hurdles. Icebergs achieve these economies by optimizing two of earth’s most affordable materials: air and light. The translucent roof is made of self-cleaning polymer sheets, one percent the weight of glass, and air-filled to form rigid “pillows”. These pillows are supported by “air beams”—used in airplane emergency slides and lightweight tents—to create the iconic pyramid forms that shed rain and snow.
The Icebergs could transform hundreds of vacant sites here and around the world into events spaces. It's a great idea. Until the buildings comes back. Which can't come soon enough.

Superfront Hawks a Different Dialectic in Brooklyn

Urban Omnibus has put together another great video, this time on Superfront, a new-ish storefront collaborative space on the further reaches of Atlantic Avenue. (We're partial to it not only because it's a cool idea but also one of us is moving around the corner and also happens to have a friend who lives in the back of the space from time to time.) The video is basically an interview with the space's founder, Mitch McEwan, an ebullient mouthful of architectural contradictions. Our favorite line: "There really aren't a lot of opportunities to make mistakes in architecture. And this is an opportunity for me to make mistakes in architecture." Now what's yours?
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The Most Fun at P.S. 1?

Admittedly, we've been pretty darn obsessed with this year's P.S.1 Young Architects Program, Pole Dance. But after last week's party, the enthusiasm appears to have been justified. Not because this is the first one ever with its own interactive component, where you can log-on to the Pole Dance site and manipulate its sound (also a first) with your phone, or watch visualizations, or upload your own pictures. Not because of all the beautiful and architecturally famous people who came out, as our photos clearly document. No, this may just be the best damned pavilion in the program's decade-long history because it's the most damn fun. Your proof is after the jump.
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Warm-Up Lap for Pole Dance

Over the weekend, we happened to be biking by the (newly renamed) MoMA PS1 in Long Island City when we noticed something unusual, familiar, even. It was SO-IL's Pole Dance, this year's Young Architects pavilion, taking shape. The museum was closing, so we only snapped one furtive, washed-out photo (let's call it arty) on our cellphone before security made us leave. Fortunately, Frederick Fisher cut some slats in the imposing concrete wall he created as part of the museum's 1997 redesign, so we managed to capture a little bit more of the installation, emphasis on little. Still, it looks like it'll be fun, and we can't help but notice how close it is to the renderings, as you can see after the jump.
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Figment Island

After nearly a year of waiting, we've now seen the new designs coming to Governors Island sometime in the future. But there is also some exciting architecture, art, and, most importantly, mini golf coming to the island this summer, part of the fourth annual Figment arts program that has been populating the island with exciting activities and edifices since the park first opened. On Friday, Figment announced the winners of its call for entries for the aforementioned projects, namely an architecture pavilion, 17 sculptures, and a 10-hole mini golf course. Eschewing the flashy forms of the three finalists they beat out, Ann Ha and Behrang Behin took a creative yet affordable approach with their winning Living Pavilion, tethering together milk crates to create planters for a garden that proceed to fold in on themselves, forming a wave-like tunnel sodded with grass. Check out the architecture finalists plus a few of the winning sculptures after the jump.
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The Dispersion

“We all have day jobs, and we don’t all live in the same city, or even on the same continent,” said Andrew Lyon, one of the six members of the multi-disciplinary design collective The Functionality. “But we all have a shared desired – to make something.” Lyon was standing beside Colin Harris, a civil engineer and fellow member of The Functionality. Huddled together against the cold last Saturday, the three of us barely fit inside W Project Space, a diminutive storefront gallery on a grubby block of Division Street, in a neighborhood that’s become a kind of lightning rod for just the kind of art practice the Functionality seems interested in pursuing: work that’s categorically messy, temporary, and site specific. Here, in the tiny storefront there’s a sixer of beer on the floor, half empty. Late '90s hip-hop issues cheerfully out of the tinny speakers of a portable boom box. Honestly, anything louder would overwhelm the space. It’s like being invited to an art opening inside a VW Bus. Over our heads hangs the reason for the gathering: a seductively tactile, monochromatic felt membrane entitled “Feel It, Take It,” designed and installed by The Functionality for a span of time as brief as W Project Space is small. The Functionality “explores issues of technology, culture and economics, through considered research and tactile experimentation,” according to the collective’s spartan website. Its members include architects, artists and engineers who treat the group as a counterpoint to the five-year timetables of institutional architecture, a venue for ushering something real into the world in short order. Something gone but never forgotten. Hence “Feel It, Take It,” an assemblage of 140 strips of felt—custom-designed and -cut scarves, actually. The form of the piece was created using procedural modeling software. Formally organized along the graph of a catenary, “Feel It, Take It,” hangs from the ceiling of W Project Space, its form both alien and inviting. The idea is that tonight, at the end of the closing party (scheduled to take place one day after the opening), the installation will be disassembled and distributed to the attendees, each of whom will then disperse into the night. The work will dissolve into the city. Within minutes of my arrival, a stream of people began to descend on the miniature space, some invited by The Functionality, others just curious about the miniature gallery and the lovely object it contained. Within 30 minutes, around 50 people were jostling around the tiny space, sipping canned Pabst beneath the installation’s voluptuous folds. But as the moment approached to begin sending “Feel It, Take It” out, piecemeal, into the five boroughs, the city itself took dispersal into its own hands. It’s hard to fit so many architects into a space that’s roughly the size of a walk-in freezer without a little raucous spillover into the Chinatown night. As if on cue, a battery of NYPD cruisers converged on the space just before nine. As Lyon and Harris pleaded their case to a stony-faced sergeant—he was clearly not interested in generative processes or the beauty of interrelated systems—most of the crowd quietly evaporated. But what’s design without unexpected complications? An email the next morning announcing “Scarves for All” invited another (decidedly more tame) visit to W Project Space on Sunday to collect a scarf. For those who couldn’t make it, The Functionality will be making the felt strands available to anyone who sends postage and a self-addressed envelope, potentially increasing the distribution radius of “Feel It, Take It” by hundreds or even thousands of miles.
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Coronary Blockage

With Valentines Day barely a week away, the Times Square Alliance is eschewing flowers and candy yet again. Instead, they're sending New Yorkers a giant designer valentine for the second year in a row, as Moorhead & Moorhead will stage an installation adjacent the TKTS Booth beginning next Thursday. For the inaugural effort, Gage/Clemenceau created a laser-cut heart as flashy as the surrounding billboards. This year's entry is rather more demur, as Granger Moorhead explained. "We looked at last year's entry, 'Two Tons of Love,' and, well, at the end of the day you're just left with two tons of stuff, not to knock that project," Moorhead said. "We didn't want to do something that would be there at the end. We wanted something more ephemeral." The designers—Granger runs the firm with his brother Robert—settled on something that would leave no trace, except maybe for a puddle: 169 blocks of ice, inspired by mason's stones, stacked 10 feet high. Moorhead said the designers had been attracted by the challenge of having to design something that would be unpredictable, where they would not be in complete control. "We have no idea how this could turn out," he said. So forget our first thought, that a giant melting heart seemed like a melancholy reminder of the follies of love. Instead, we've been convinced by Moorhead to view this as a more promising reminder of love's potential, the breaking down of barriers, that first flutter in the chest. Just be careful not to slip and fall. You might wind up heartbroken.