Posts tagged with "Infill":

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Unveiled> Columbus, Ohio redevelops site of dead downtown mall

The future came into focus last week for the site of a defunct mall in downtown Columbus, Ohio. By the time City Center mall closed in 2009, only its parking structure remained a popular destination. Columbus Downtown Development Corporation replaced the dead mall with Columbus Commons, a nine-acre park slated for mixed-use development over the coming years. Renderings from NBBJ, published March 25 in Columbus Underground, show the latest phase of that project: a modern, 17-story mixed-use tower that developers The Daimler Group and Kaufman Development are calling Two25 Commons. Another NBBJ tower dubbed 250 High is already under construction on the south end of the Commons site, set to rise 12 stories. The new building will have 20,000 square feet of ground floor retail, 125,000 square feet of office space across five floors, and 11 stories containing 170 apartment and condo units. It will have underground parking and a connection to the existing parking structure via a new pedestrian bridge over Rich Street.
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Minneapolis City Council to vote on mixed-use makeover for Downtown East neighborhood

In its last scheduled meeting of the year, Minneapolis City Council could give the go-ahead on a $400 million mixed-use development near the new Vikings stadium. Surface parking lots currently occupy much of that land. The Minneapolis Star-Tribune editorial board called the Downtown East neighborhood “a part of the city’s commercial core in desperate need of new life.” The newspaper stands to benefit from the project, as the editorial announces—they plan to sell five blocks of nearby property, including their current headquarters, and move downtown. With 1.1 million square feet of office space, apartments, retail space, and a park, the Ryan Cos. project could attract tax revenue to the city, as Wells Fargo is reportedly looking to anchor the development as a corporate tenant. It also includes a 1,625-space parking ramp. Mayor R.T. Rybak said that over 30 years the project will generate $42 million in property taxes for the city, $50 million for Hennepin County and $35 million for the Minneapolis public schools. The public-private partnership does not call for tax-increment financing. Instead, it asks the City Council to approve $65 million in bonds, to be paid off by revenue from the project’s parking ramp over 30 years. The developer would cover shortfalls for the first 10 years. Minneapolis has embarked on several large-scale urban redevelopment projects, including a makeover of the city's "Main Street" by James Corner Field Operations.
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TEN Arquitectos’ Brooklyn Cultural District Tower Approved by City Council

Yesterday, the New York City Council approved a 32-story tower designed by TEN Arquitectos that is set to rise on an empty parcel adjacent to the Brooklyn Academy of Music. As AN reported last November, the site is the last undeveloped city-owned lot in the district. The mixed-use project will include 300 residential units (60 which will be "affordable"); 50,000 square feet of cultural space to be shared by BAM Cinema, performance groups connected with 651 Arts, and a new branch of the Brooklyn Public Library; a 10,000-square-foot public plaza; and 15,000 square feet of ground-level retail. “Two Trees is grateful to the City Council for its support and proud to partner with the city and some of Brooklyn’s most innovative cultural institutions to advance the growth of downtown Brooklyn’s world-class cultural district,” said Jed Walentas, a principal at Two Trees Management, in a statement. “With cultural space, much-needed affordable housing, and a new public plaza, we will be transforming a parking lot into an iconic building with many public benefits.”
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Ismael Leyva Architects’ Skinny Residential Tower Set To Rise in Tribeca

Back in October 2010, ground was broken at 19 Park Place—which also has frontage on Murray Street directly across from AN's office. As Curbed reported nearly three years ago, the 25-foot-wide site was set to be the home of the Tribeca Royale, a futuristic, 21-story condominium tower designed by New York-based Ismael Leyva Architects and developed by ABN Reality. Signage on the construction site and a press release that landed in our mailbox today assure that the project is still going forward as planned, but a peek out of the office window confirms that progress on this Jetsonian tower has been moving at a stone-aged pace. Ismael Leyva Architects' design fits 24 residences into a 292-foot tower on the narrow site. The upper 11 floors contain full-floor units, with duplexes on the 7th and 8th floors. Every unit will feature windows on Park as well as Murray. The 53,000-square-foot project also includes a double height lobby, gym, residents’ lounges, and ample terraces. “Our goal with the Tribeca Royale was to create a state-of-the-art residential building that showcases unique urban design given the constraints of the site, while efficiently maximizing space,” said Ismael Leyva in a statement. “This design offers unique residences in a very desirable downtown location” While AN eagerly awaits its shinny new neighbor, it seams like construction crews have been doing more digging than building over the past few years. A worker on site confirmed that problems with the foundation have been the cause of the delay, but with activity on the site seemingly never ceasing, one can assume that something must be going up soon.  
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Help! Only Two Votes Needed To Fix California’s Infill Policy

Okay, let's take advantage of this Democracy thing, folks... Today you have the rare opportunity to shape urban planning policy in California by convincing a few swing voters in the state's Senate to support AB 710, the Infill Development and Sustainable Community Act of 2011. Apparently the bill is two votes shy of passage. If passed it would do a number of things to improve the state's sprawling urban development policy, including... The  bill would encourage development on small lots in urban areas near transit corridors; it would require planning agencies to adopt regional transportation plans aimed at achieving balanced, coordinated, and planet-friendly transit systems; and it would prohibit cities and counties from requiring a minimum parking standard greater than one parking space per 1,000 square feet of nonresidential improvements. So write to the following assembly-people and tell them to vote YES: Senator Alex PadillaCurren PriceCarol Liu, Kevin de Leon, Fran Pavley and Ron Calderon. Don't just sit there, start emailing!