Posts tagged with "INABA":

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Archtober Building of the Day #15> Red Bull Studios

Archtober Building of the Day #15 Red Bull Studios 220 West 18th Street SLAB Architecture/INABA Jeffrey Inaba didn’t have wings, but guided a big group of Archtober enthusiasts and pick up party goers on a tour of Red Bull Studios in Chelsea. Introduced by Lance Jay Brown, 2014 AIANY President, the former Angelino, via OMA, presented a slick 38,000 square foot music studio/gallery/corporate office that spans all trends. With a psychedelic installation curated by Phong Bui and Rail Curatorial Projects, the public spaces, cleverly planned with acoustics and crowd control in mind, sang out with raucous voices of overstimulation—not INABA's work.  The planning, though, underlying the funk and festivity was rock solid, creating a diversity of public space, engaging from the street, clear divisions of public and private, and fantastic core toilets. The space on the lower floors was created for the Red Bull Music Academy, a sponsorship of the hopped up drink with young musicians and more senior leaders in the industry.  Radio broadcasting, recording, and rehearsal studios are integral to the lower floors program. The sound separation technologies suggested that unspeakable decibel levels were not uncommon. Small kiosks of Red Bull beverages were everywhere…as if you couldn’t go too far without tanking up again. Upstairs were the corporate types, although we did not see too many people at their bench-style desks. A masterful display of mechanical, electrical and sprinkler plumbing coordination made the exposed systems of the open loft space quite orderly and well organized. We got our requisite amphitheater interconnecting stair, although with this one, we had the feeling that some of the rockers from downstairs could pop up and enliven it, once the lights were out. Tomorrow we visit Post-Disaster Interim Housing in Cadman Plaza, Brooklyn.
Cynthia Phifer Kracauer, AIA, is the Managing Director of the Center for Architecture and the festival director for Archtober:  Architecture and Design Month NYC.  She was previously a partner at Butler Rogers Baskett, and from 1989-2005 at Swanke Hayden Connell.  After graduating from Princeton (AB 1975, M.Arch 1979) she worked for Philip Johnson,  held faculty appointments at the University of Virginia, NJIT, and her alma mater. ckracauer@aiany.org 
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Bright public art installation to light up New York City’s cold, dark winter

The summer is officially over, folks. The beaches are closed, the sun is switching to its seasonal, part-time schedule, and your coworkers are drinking Pumpkin Spice Lattes again. There is no ignoring an inevitable truth: winter is coming and there is nothing you can do about it. Well, if you live up north that is. You could move to Florida, but beyond that, there is nothing you can do about it. For those of us stuck in New York City this holiday season, it's not all bad news. We will soon be able to feast our frostbitten eyes on a new public art installation in front of the Flatiron Building. Today, the Flatiron Partnership and Van Alen Institute announced that New York Light, an installation by architect and designer INABA, has won their first-ever Flatiron Plaza Holiday Design Competition. INABA’s angled structure, which is made of mirrored panels and steel tubes, will frame the Flatiron Building on the south and open up to the Empire State Building to the north. At night, New York Light, it will be illuminated by LEDs. “The Flatiron Plaza is one of the few places where it’s possible to truly experience the magnificence of Manhattan’s urban plan. And it’s a unique spot in the heart of the city where the sky and skyline can be seen from street level,” said Jeffrey Inaba, the founder of INABA, in a statement. “The installation is meant to be a place to take in these qualities, as well as to appreciate all of the street activity day and night through its many reflective panels.” New York Light will open before Thanksgiving and run for one month. Tillotson Design Associates, Ben Gal Fierro, and Buro Happold collaborated with INABA on the project.
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INABA Creates a Cylindrical Beacon For A Norwegian Concert Hall

 
Fabrikator

INABA's inverted chandelier comprises a steel frame clad with aluminum tubes and activated by LEDs.

Both simple in its geometry and intriguing in its illumination, a massive new lighting installation in Stavanger, Norway, aims to activate the lobby of a concert hall and create a welcoming civic gesture. Designed by New York-based INABA, the cylindrical structure responds to its setting in a variety of ways. Cutaways in the cylinder reveal views out for visitors inside the concert hall and also reveal slices of the dynamic LED lighting inside the structure to people outside the concert hall on the plaza. Jeffrey Inaba, principal of INABA, calls the installation Skylight, and refers to it as an “inverted chandelier.” The light is reflected within the rings, rather than out. The outside is coated in glossy white to reflect the warmer daylight and ambient light in the building. The design of Skylight is meant to function as a recognizable figure for the building, which was designed by Oslo-based Ratio Arkitekter.
  • Fabricator  DAMTSA
  • Architect  INABA
  • Location  Stavanger, Norway
  • Date of Completion  January 2013
  • Material  Hollow tube steel, 1-inch-square-profile aluminum tubes, LEDs
  • Process  Rhino, rolled steel, standardized connections
In order to make the maximum impact given the constraints of a public art budget, Inaba and his team worked closely with the well-known Argentinian fabricator DAMTSA, which fabricated the exterior panels at Neil Denari’s HL23. By keeping the geometry simple—just a cylinder with cutaways—Inaba was able to standardize the curvature of the installation, which simplified the process of rolling the hollow tube steel frame. One-inch-square-profile aluminum tubes clad the exterior of the cylinder, connected to the frame with standardized attachment details. DAMTSA and INABA worked together on several prototypes before ultimately settling on the cladding system. INABA designed Skylight in Rhino and collaborated with Buro Happold on the steel structure. The 22-foot-by-38-foot permanent installation, which weighs 6.5 tons, is suspended from the ceiling by a double pin connection. The angle at which it hangs is determined by the weight of the structure. It aligns with the angle of incidence of the sun, which allows the structure to have the fewest possible shadows throughout the day. The LED lighting scheme, animated by New York–based MTWTF, within the rings changes for intermissions, curtain calls, and when the hall is not in use. INABA decided to use pure white and aqua marine light so as to differentiate the installation from the warmer house illumination and the famed Nordic light. Mezzanines surround Skylight on three sides, giving concertgoers numerous vantage points to view the piece as well as the landscape beyond. For INABA, the piece suggests a way to move forward in their approach to architecture. “We’re interested in how do you take the constraints of costs, construction techniques and turn that into a conceptual framework,” Inaba said. “Skylight is not a piece of architecture, but it shows how we are pursuing architectural practice.”
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Eight Emerging Voices Honored by the Architectural League

Eight up-and-coming architecture firms from across North America have been distinguished as Emerging Voices by the Architectural League. The prestigious award is bestowed annually on a group of firms that have established a distinct design voice in their work and have "the potential to influence the disciplines of architecture, landscape design, and urbanism." This year's winners are INABA, 5468796 architecture, SCAPE Landscape Architecture, Studio NMinusOne, Oyler Wu Collaborative, SsD, Arquitectura 911sc, and Atelier TAG. A jury comprised of Henry Cobb, Geoff Manaugh, Paul Lewis, Jamie Maslyn Larson, Annabelle Selldorf, Claire Weisz, and Dan Wood selected the firms based on a review of their portfolios. Past Emerging Voices have included many of today's top-name architects including Morphosis, Enrique Norten, Deborah Berke, Michael Maltzan, SHoP Architects, Jeanne Gang, and Steven Holl. Each year, the winning firms present their work at a lecture series presented by the League in New York. Beginning on March 2, will take place at the Rose Auditorium in the new Morphosis-designed building at The Cooper Union. Also watch for an upcoming issue of The Architect's Newspaper where we feature a profile of each Emerging Voices winner. Information on the lecture series and architecture firms from the Architectural League: All lectures will be held at the Rose Auditorium, The Cooper Union, 41 Cooper Square, New York City at 7:00 p.m. Tickets are required for admission to the lectures. For more information on the lectures and tickets, visit www.archleague.org, beginning February 1. Friday, March 2 INABA, Jeffrey Inaba, New York and Los Angeles: INABA’s projects range from books and diagrams to installations, creating physical form from abstract content. 5468796 architecture, Johanna Hurme and Sasa Radulovic, Winnipeg: With a focus on housing and public projects, the collaborative office playfully explores the possibilities of architecture within the constraints of modest budgets and materials. Friday, March 9 SCAPE / Landscape Architecture, Kate Orff and Elena Brescia, New York: Through its landscape and urban design practice SCAPE researches new futures for the urban-natural environment. Studio NMinusOne, Christos Marcopoulos and Carol Moukheiber, Toronto: The studio’s work, both built and theoretical, explores the frontier of the digital and real and its effects on the physiologies of occupants of buildings and environments. Friday, March 23 Oyler Wu Collaborative, Dwayne Oyler and Jenny Wu, Los Angeles: Oyler Wu’s installations, pavilions, and façade experimentations are informed by and explore fabrication processes and materials. SsD, Jinhee Park and John Hong, New York, Boston, and Seoul: The firm’s work, from private residences to light sculptures to public buildings, combines research and production to find multivalent expressions from minimal form. Friday, March 30 arquitectura911sc, Jose Castillo and Saidee Springall, Mexico City: The office responds to the rich social and political complexities of Mexico in its wide-ranging work from social housing to urban planning. Atelier TAG, Manon Asselin and Katsuhiro Yamazaki, Montreal: The firm builds primarily in the public realm exploring the civic functions of architecture.  
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Unveiled> INABA′s Norwegian Skylight

INABA has won a competition to design a permanent art work for the new concert hall in Stravanger, Norway. Called Skylight, the approximately 43 foot tall helix-like form will be visible to city through the transparent glass cladding of the five story great hall. At night colored, artificial light will animate the form and indicate cues like curtain calls. During the day it will reflect natural light throughout the space. "The idea is to do a piece that responds to the unique lighting conditions in that part of the word, to amplify it during the day and extend the the light artificially into the night," said Jeffrey Inaba, principal of Los Angeles-based INABA. While the building itself, designed by Oslo-based Medplan AS Arkitekter, is serene, the pulsating Skylight will be comparatively dynamic. "One of the architects for the building was on the jury. They supported our design. They see it as complimentary," Inaba said. The permanent art work is expected to be completed in time for building's opening in 2012.