Posts tagged with "ICFF":

Placeholder Alt Text

Highlights from ICFF 2018

There's a lot to see this year at the International Contemporary Furniture Fair (ICFF). In addition to the new designs introduced by brands, designers, and studios, there is also a fashion collection, capsule collections, and new collaborations. Below we survey a handpicked selection of highlights you won’t want to miss. Warm Nordic at Together Nordic Design This collection is an ode to traditional Nordic minimalism. The charming wooden furnishings are part of Together Nordic Design an an exhibition curated by Snohetta that features a selection of furnishings from brands based in in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden. Roto m.a.d. Furniture design Fun yet functional, these colorful clock-shapes are designed to be used as both stools and side tables. The stool-table hybrid transform when flipped, emulating the aforementioned time measuring device. Either / Or  at Collective Concept NYC-based studio The Coast debuted its first collection ever, a poetic lighting series inspired by the dichotomy between aesthetics and ethics. The fixtures turn on and off via human touch, which intentionally, causes them to gently rock to-and-fro.   Basalt Tala British light purveyor Tala introduced sand cast, mouth-blown borosilicate glass fixtures inspired thousands of extruded basalt rock columns that make up the Giant’s Causeway in  Northern Ireland. The petite collection of just two includes a ceiling pendant and touch-on-off table lamp. Arc Stools Skylar Morgan Furniture + Design These stools take the form of arched loggias. The Atlanta-based studio Skylar Morgan Furniture + Design fashioned the silhouette from wood, brass, and leather.

Self-cleaning and sustainable facade Neolith + PURETi

This facade system is treated with an aqueous and titanium dioxide nanoparticle-based treatment, which creates a photocatalytic, self-cleaning, and decontaminating effect. Put simply, the photocatalysis-activated coating is accelerated by light, decontaminating the surface millions of times per second. As a byproduct, the autonomously cleaned cladding also improves air quality.

Placeholder Alt Text

What to expect at NYCxDESIGN this year

The design industry takes over New York for NYCxDESIGN, a multifaceted platform for designers, showrooms, firms, students, and cultural institutions to share their latest projects, installations, and exhibitions. Here are a few highlights that you won’t want to miss from WantedDesign, Sight Unseen OFFSITE, ICFF, BROOKLYN DESIGNS, and independent studios.

The Fraction Collection Gentner

This collection of furniture, lighting, and decorative art objects is associated not with a particular genre but rather with a stylized aesthetic vocabulary that Christopher Gentner took a year to hash out in his Chicago studio. The collection— the culmination of sculptural abstractions, a metal material palette, negative space, kinetic components, and subtle pops of color—will be on view at ICFF.

Bough Kalon

L.A.-based Kalon Studios designed a simple collection that accentuates the inherent beauty of wood. The series—comprising a table, bench, and stool—is manufactured in a Pennsylvania workshop that specializes in woodwork.

EXCAVATED VESSELS Jeff Martin Joinery

The Canada-based studio conjured otherworldly shaped glass containers by molding and casting glass around cork molds. The collection of vessels, goblets, basins, decanters, jugs, and pitchers will debut at Collective Concept, the capsule exhibition of the Collective Design fair at ICFF.

Alabaster Totem Allied Maker

For Collective Concept at ICFF, Allied Maker designed six totems of light, each articulating a single material. The studio collaborated with six local artisans, each of whom specializes in either wood, metal, glass, stone, ceramic, or fabric. All of the luminaries stand over seven-and-and-a-half feet tall, creating a heightened presence informed by material and shape.

kinder MODERN x Mexa

Guadalajara, Mexico–based design studio Mexa teamed up with the New York City–based gallery kinder MODERN to craft a collection of outdoor furniture for children. The colorful handmade series includes a collapsible play tent, rocking planters in multiple sizes, a sculptural outdoor double-seat chaise, and individual open-frame rockers.

Neotenic Lounge JUMBO

Design duo Justin Donnelly and Monling Lee conceived a cast-steel chair with a “clumsy pipe” framework, finished in auto body paint and saddled with a dyed fur seat. The playful form was inspired by Konrad Lorenz’s 1949 study of “baby schema,” which the zoologist and Nobel laureate believed would trigger “innate releasing mechanisms” to elicit sympathy in the beholder.

Rye Sofa TRE

In the international wing at Wanted Design, visitors are encouraged to configure and reconfigure partitions to make one solid mass. Articulated by vibrant and contrasting colors, three modules of varying sizes form myriad seating combinations.

Placeholder Alt Text

NYC Design Week Trend Report: craving concrete

With all of the goings-on during NYCxDesign, it can be hard to wrap one's brain around everything on display. Thoughts range from "That's beautiful" to "What's going on here?" and, at the end of a week, everything begins to meld to gather in a phantasmagoria of colors, textures, and styles. One recurring motif that stuck in our mind was concrete. Sure, home decor has been gearing toward the material for some time, but all over the city—including Sight Unseen OFFSITE and ICFF—concrete was being molded into unexpected design elements. MMATERIAL Designed and constructed by Fernando Mastrangelo, his newest line of sculptural furniture uses hand-dyed and cast concrete to create surprisingly smooth stools, tables, and art. He also has a large retail installation in the works utilizing the same techniques, but more on that later. Concrete Cat Concrete Cat's Oracle pattern is one-of-a-kind, and is actually cast into each piece rather than being applied or painted onto the surface. In addition to beautiful homewares (including the above cinderblocks that can be used in hundreds of ways from furniture, to modular walls), they also specialize in architectural castings, including retail displays, fireplaces, and tiles. Lyon Beton This collection of fiberglass coated concrete furniture adapts a mid-century, minimal style that really stood out at this year's ICFF. The pieces are fairly light, and use a combination of sophisticated polished concrete, with a more industrial rough-textured back and wrought irons legs. Plus they make whimsical vases, toilet paper holders, and art. IN.SEK These beautiful concrete pendant lamps are available in a range of different sizes and shapes; they also come in classic smooth concrete or excavation-light that makes it appear as if light is escaping from the cracks in a decaying building. On top of beautiful lighting, In.Sek also makes excavated stools that resemble caves growing quartz crystals. OSO Industries' Rollerboys may look like an average round stool or coffee table, but these ultra-light cylinders roll around on recessed wheels that give the illusion that they float. It has never been easier to transition furniture from indoors to out, plus they are available in twelve color options to match any decor.
Placeholder Alt Text

Product>ICFF Preview

This year ICFF and Wanted Design span ten days and two boroughs with events happening 24/7. Here are a few of the pieces from the show that we are excited about seeing up close in person.

Embrace Lounge Chair Carl Hansen & Søn Created by Austrian design trio EOOS, the Embrace Lounge Chair is a more relaxed version of a dining chair by the same name that debuted in 2015. The new version combines Carl Hansen’s classic wood frame with a comfortable upholstered cushion.

Lattice Nanimarquina

Lattice is the second collaboration between Nanimariquina and the Bouroullec brothers. For it, they experimented with the options of ancient kilim techniques to create a pattern that was balanced and proportional, yet also irregular. It comes in two color variations, as well as the option to commission custom pieces.

Pluralis Fritz Hansen

This new meeting table design by Danish designer Kasper Salto is aptly named—it is intended to accommodate a variety of different settings and function as a blank slate for creativity.

New finishes Fantini

Gunmetal, copper bronze, and British gold are three new finish options that Fantini is adding to its collection. These three hues have been trending heavily in kitchen and bath design, and now allow for an even larger range of customization.

Comforty Mellow Maja Ganszyniec

This couch, in addition to dozens of other award-wining ceramics, glassware, clothing, and furniture designs, will be on display at Pole Position, a presentation by Culture.pl on some of the best designs out of Poland.

Vague Stelle chandelier Santa & Cole

To celebrate their 30th anniversary, Barcelona-based lighting brand Santa & Cole is reissuing a fixture that was originally designed by Antoni de Moragas, one of Spain’s preeminent postwar architects. It was inspired by medieval architecture and the designs of Viennese Secessionists Joseph Maria Olbrich and Adolf Loos.

Placeholder Alt Text

Norwegian Invasion: Norsk design and architecture is having a moment

When the words “Scandinavian Design” come up, most people quickly think about Finland, Sweden, and Denmark. But Norway is no slouch, either. Recently, the nation's designers have been drumming up noise in the worlds of furniture, product design, and architecture. A string of exhibitions, a master plan for New York’s Times Square, and a robust program of roadside pavilions and viewing platforms highlight this Norsk moment. Leading the way are architects Snøhetta, who have been on quite the streak in the last year, most recently gaining commissions to master plan Penn Station and Times Square, just ten blocks from each other in New York. While their Times Square design isn’t the firm's most dramatic work—indeed, it's intended to be a subtle backdrop to the chaotic public space—but it should be a welcome, nuanced addition to the commercial free-for-all that includes Guy’s American Kitchen & Bar. Just a few blocks to the west—towards the Hudson River—the Royal Norwegian Consulate General showed off the country’s design prowess at a recent series of events. At Wanted Design, Calm, Cool and Collected: New Designs from Norway, a booth full of Norsk people and treasures, showcased the subtle use of wood characteristic of Scandinavian design. The up-and-coming studios on display included A-Form, Stokke Austad, Anderssen & Voll, Lars Beller Fjetland, Everything Elevated, Kristine Five Melvær, and Sverre Uhnger. Also sponsored by the Norwegian government was Insidenorway at the International Contemporary Furniture Fair (ICFF), which hosted a group of classic Norwegian brands: Figgjo, Mandal Veveri, Røros Tweed, and VAD. Plates by Figgjo were offered in three styles and featured an elegant flat base and flared edge. Røros Tweed showed off textiles by other famous Norwegians—Anderssen & Voll, Snøhetta, and Bjarne Melgaard. At Collective Design, Oslo- and Tokyo-based Fuglen Gallery showcased an assortment of objects both new and old, alongside work by Norwegian artist Arne Lindaas. The eclectic assortment showed the thematic extension of Norwegian modernism into the 21st century, encompassing much of the iconic work with new, up-and-coming designers. In 2014, Norwegian Icons was curated by Fuglen and Blomqvist at Openhouse Gallery in New York, and showcased the Midcentury design that peaked in Norway around 1950–1970. This exhibition actually continued the tradition of Norway’s promotional shows on the international stage, while also setting up some context for the other shows. It is not just international exhibitions and commissions that have drawn attention to Norway’s strong design culture. The Norwegian Public Roads Administration famously commissions its infrastructure to architects. Across the country, there are points of architectural interest, many of which are located in scenic areas. Most famously, the Trollstigen National Tourist Route has six stunning overlooks. Besides Snøhetta’s iconic designs such as the Oslo Opera House, there are architects like Fantastic Norway and Reiulf Ramstad who are consistently producing top work. At institutions like Fuglen, 0047, and the Oslo School of Architecture & Design, intellectual communities thrive, fostering a strong community of young designers like MMW and Atelier Oslo. The city will get an additional cultural boost during the 2016 Oslo Triennale, curated by New York–based team at After Belonging Agency, a group of five Spanish architects, curators and scholars. Take a look at some of Norway's top new design in the gallery below.    
Placeholder Alt Text

Come celebrate NYCxDesign with The Architect’s Newspaper at these great Design Week events

AN is participating in some great events during the upcoming NYCxDesign—the city's annual celebration of all things design. If you live in New York, or are in town from May 8–19, here are some key happenings to keep on your radar. In addition, at all these events and shows you'll get the chance to pick up a copy of AN's first special residential interiors issue, which is packed with information on other design happenings around town, highlights from the local art scene, stories on the latest trends in the field, and pages and pages of gorgeous homes. Hope to see you around town! BKLYN Designs Come see the upstarts in Brooklyn and visit the AN/AIANY New Practices Lounge. AN's Editor-in-Chief William Menking is conducting a panel with the new faces of Brooklyn architecture. Sunday, May 10th, 3pm-4pm Brooklyn Expo Center 72 Noble St, Brooklyn Frieze Art Fair Make your way to Randall's Island for one of the world's top contemporary art festivals. May 14-17 Randall's Island Park Duravit + The Architect's Newspaper Join AN at one of New York's best bathroom showrooms for a special event celebrating new collections from Philippe Starck and Christian Werner. Friday, May 15, 6-8pm Duravit NYC 105 Madison Avenue RSVP Here designjunction edit New York Check out an excellently curated display of interior design elements from leading global brands. May 15-18 ArtBeam 540 W 21st Street WantedDesign Visit Wanted's original platform for promoting design and see AN's Editor-in-Chief William Menking is moderating "Bright Architecture," a conversation on lighting, innovation, & architecture. May 16, 5:45-6:45pm. Terminal Stores 269 11th Avenue ICFF Now on its 27th year, this is the United States' biggest contemporary design showcase. Come say hi to AN staffers at booth #1870. May 16-19 Javits Center 655 West 34th Street
Placeholder Alt Text

Save the date! Here’s your first sneak peek of NYCxDESIGN 2015

We might be in the thick of winter, but planning is already underway for the third annual NYCxDESIGN coming up in the Spring. On Thursday morning, organizers—NYC & Company and the NYC Economic Development Corporation—invited members of the design community, fittingly, to the newly opened and revamped Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum to kick off the week-long, citywide design festivities taking place May 8–19. The program offers a platform to more than 40,000 designers and 3,900 design firms practicing in the city to showcase their work. Over the course of 12 days, a variety of exhibitions, installations, panel discussions, and open studios will be held in venues throughout Manhattan and Brooklyn. Six returning events anchor the program, including: BKLYN DESIGNS (May 8–10), WantedDesign Brooklyn (May 1–19), Collective Design (May 13–17), Frieze Art Fair (May 14–17), WantedDesign Manhattan (May 15–18), and ICFF (May 16–19). The opening night of BKLYN Designs will be the official launch of NYCxDESIGN. If last year's impressive turnout of 2,000-plus listings at 181 venues is telling, then May 2015 will be a busy one for those in the design sector.
Placeholder Alt Text

Product> Furnishings from New York City’s ICFF Expo

At ICFF 2014, mature design reclaimed the stage. With other exhibit opportunities for up-and-coming designers—WantedDesign and Sight Unseen Offsite, along with the Industry City venue in Brooklyn—established manufacturers set the tenor of the show this year. Further cementing the show's place near the top of the trade show hierarchy, many of the exhibitors that displayed their wares at Salone del Mobile in Milan a few short weeks ago were also present in New York. Here are six products that stood out to AN among the rows of exhibitors. Blu Dot Swish Desk A split-level sliding top and drawer stretch the storage capacity of this neo-modern, white-ash desk. Legs in white or grey. Marset Ginger Topped by a shallow, cup-like shade of oak or wenge veneer, the fixture uses a LED light source; also available in floor and table models. Designed by Joan Gaspar. Foscarini Spokes Concealed at the top and bottom of the fixture, LED lamps cast light upwards and downwards, casting shadows from the metal, cage-like shade. Designed by Vicente Garcia Jimenez and Cinzia Cumini. Bensen Tokyo Chair With aesthetic lineage extending to Danish and Japanese design, the slightly torqued armrests of this solid wood chair are key to its contemporary presence. In black ash, walnut, white ash, and white oak, with a leather seat. Designed by Niels Bendtsen. Fritz Hansen Analog Table Merging square, circle, and oval into an inviting, unique form, the legs of this table are angled to allow more comfortable seating. In five colors and finishes, it is suitable for home or office use. Designed by Jaime Hayon. Rimadesio Self Up Classic dressers, nightstands, and sideboards are revitalized in lacquered glass and aluminum frames and feet. Available in 62 colors. Designed by Giuseppe Bavuso.
Placeholder Alt Text

Min | Day Unveiling Transformable Furniture For ICFF

MOD, the newly-created furniture wing from San Francisco architecture firm Min | Day, will be unveiling three new pieces at ICFF next week.  By making use of the human inclinations to rearrange and reconfigure, the pieces grow through a simple geometry of addition and subtraction. All three styles utilize playfulness and improvisation to create topological terrains.  The AVA is a steel storage system that on it’s own can be used as a stool or small table, however, when combined with more than one unit it can quickly become a complex shelving system, room divider and space converter whose precise tonalities along with its lightweight metal and shifting angles create inherent drama. Soft Stones furniture is comprised of eight unique components that transform from a lounge when fitted in place to individual seats and small tables when broken apart and scattered throughout a room. The line is constructed out of steel, foam, and upholstery fabric and comes in five colors. It resembles, perhaps, an undiscovered geologic formation, as it’s geometry pervades a muted yet playful interpretation of shattered boulders. Pentables, a five-sided table system originally designed with students at the University of Nebraska is made of welded steel and goes together  quickly. It grows in similar ways to the AVA system, where it can exist on its’ own but can also be added to with additional units.
Placeholder Alt Text

Q+A> Design Week with Todd Bracher

For the final installment of AN's New York Design Week Q+A series, we talked with Todd Bracher about his Nest and forthcoming Asa collections, his design philosophy, and inspirations. And Kevin Stark stopped in to visit, as well. How did your collaboration with HBF come about? I reached out originally to Kevin Stark a few years ago, who was the vice president of design at that time. I've been in the [design] business for 15 years but worked mostly overseas, so I wanted to find the right partner [stateside]. HBF entered my radar because they produce European craftsmanship; their products are really high quality. A year later a mutual friend reintroduced us and that ignited the relationship. todd_bracher_01 What was particularly enticing about working with HBF? I wanted to pick the best [company] that's out there; those that I know are reliable and bring quality products to market. But they also have to be fun to work with and trustworthy. So when I surveyed the landscape to see who was smart, growing—really it was a long checklist—there weren’t a lot of companies that landed on that list, but HBF did. They have a really European level of quality, and I don’t mean that in a negative way. In Europe, [furniture] is not just an industry but a passion, and HBF embodies that. What was your design intent for the collections? For Nest, we wanted to hit the perfect balance between lounge and workspace seating, and bridge productivity and comfort. It's about eye contact at the end of the day. That's what collaboration is fundamentally about. Physical spatial relationships and engaging is really important. We're designing for how you actually work. It sounds obvious but not a lot of [companies] do that. HBF is known for its wood work, as well as upholstery, and both are expensive, so we had to find a way to put the money where you need it most. For Nest, we steam-bent wood and used mesh from athletic footwear [on the back]. These design choices were 20 percent cheaper and faster to manufacturer. The mesh is lightweight, and [using it on the chair] was the perfect marriage to bring the material to market. You pay a lot of money to cover things up [with furniture] so if we make the insides beautiful we don’t have to. What were some of the challenges you faced? Probably cost. It's hard to make beautiful things affordable. The trick is to make the design manufacturable. You have to engage the full team and use their expertise, and pare down what you're doing without losing comfort and freshness. [Your design] has to be relevant to today, not [just] reminiscent of the past. Sometimes we get it right. Where did the name for the collection come from? For Nest, it’s pretty straightforward. It was all about the idea of keeping things, like our conversations, and containing your experiences. It’s like a protective container so you’re “Nested” in place. For Asa, the S of the word is the inspiration. The body is S-shaped and the frame is A-shaped. The name is a visual representation of the chair. What are the successes of the collection? Cost is always the challenge but that’s not specific to HBF. The real challenge is getting to solve collaboration in an elegant way, and that’s not always so. [You have to] do it in a way that you'd love to have [that piece] in your office space or in your home. A lot of times, you get a brief saying “solve collaboration” and then a block of plastic to work with but we’re solving this in a human way. We're using wood with tactile qualities, in ways that are familiar to HBF and their customer. That's pretty tricky to do. It’s about two mentalities coming together and you want it to have both [the designer’s and the manufacturer’s] identity. It also has to be strong visually, comfortable—all these things must lineup. [Nest] can go into a hotel lobby, a lounge area, and what I like about it is that you can spec it for power integration, or combine it with laptop table [for the office]. It’s not obvious but that’s what it’s designed for it. The difference with HBF is that it's not obviously collaborative furniture. The vocabulary of the furniture collection shouldn't look collaborative, and that's what [can] broaden the market. What inspires you? [I find inspiration in] loads of things, but I tend not to draw inspiration from design. It’s usually from food, travel, music; things I don’t know. If it's familiar it doesn't click as inspiration. though I certainly appreciate those things. For me, it’s more about the process. Before we design anything we create an ecosystem and define what's important for the collection. Maybe it's eye contact, privacy, comfort, but not too much. We really need to define the solution and once we do that the design appears. The more data we put into it, the better the outcome. I always use a tree analogy. You don’t think tree is good looking; you take it for what it is because it's not about the look but the solution. Look at nature. How often does she get it wrong? Is there a designer or architect you really admire? The architects that I love are long dead and buried. [You could say] I’m a fan of the older styles. Toward the end of the conversation we were joined by Kevin Stark, president of the brand and head of design. He offered his thoughts on the success of Bracher’s collections for HBF: We have worked with a great cadre of designers in the past and Todd has a different point of view. His way of aesthetically and functionally solving problems is unique and has been great for HBF. We spent a lot of time interviewing designers and architects about their needs and Todd solves problems first. The Nest [collection] has been a great success for us—and he is great for us. For me this [Nest lounge chair] is an iconic piece. He spent time to understand our craftsmanship and so we stretched our limitation in a good way. Todd gives a new view we haven't had in a while. Asa is one of the pieces that is familiar but totally fresh at the same time. It has a classic form and design but also a uniqueness to it; the scale in terms of lightness and even the arms the thickness of the back. It's one of the lowest priced pieces [from HBF] and he's pulled off a beautiful, contemporary, classic design at a great value. In terms of HBF’s direction, Todd has been integral and given us a glimpse of what we’ll look like in the future from a functional, problem solving, and aesthetic perspective. It's been a great relationship. We have a great history of lounge furniture for reception areas, and there will always be a place for that, but lounge seating is entering a new area. There is a more collaborative and interactive need. Todd's pieces fit well into that collaborative intent of how people are using those areas. And we're just at the beginning of that learning curve, in terms of this changing working environment and dealing with those issues.
Placeholder Alt Text

Q+A> Design Week with Christian Rasmussen

On the opening day of the International Contemporary Furniture Fair (ICFF) at the Javits Center, AN sat down with Christian Rasmussen, the head of design for Fritz Hansen, to discuss the company's design strategies, its philosophy on collaboration, and to test out the new Favn and Ro seating that has just been released in the U.S. What are your impressions of ICFF? It's getting better every year and I'm seeing more interesting stuff. I was surprised last year and this one is even better. Last month we were in Milan but it's so big. I like that ICFF is more focused and offers a tighter overlook. You can spend more time in each booth as opposed to Milan where you have to move very fast to see everything. Overall it's really positive. How are the new releases being shown at ICFF this year significant for Fritz Hansen? We just released the Ro chair, which means tranquility in Danish. We wanted to design a chair where you could sit down and create your own atmosphere in the midst of this hectic life. Similarly, this sofa by Jaime Hayon, Favn, means embrace because its like two hands cradling you. Danish is a small language, spoken only by five million people, so it's nice to use these [names]. Denmark has a long history of furniture design and we've been a part of it since 1872. [Design] is really part of our culture and at Fritz Hansen we've helped create some of that identity. The reason we pick the Danish names, in addition to the fact that its hard to name a piece, is that it's its nice to [hear other languages] interpret the names in their own way. How would you describe the releases? You can divide our work into new and classic categories. I'm really happy with the Ro chair, because its close to the Egg Chair but it's still its own. It's like a cousin; they're very clearly related. It's very important to draw a red line between the past and present but still keep some of that design DNA. It's part of our philosophy to stand on the shoulders of the classics. We have a number of design values we follow very carefully to make sure we're on the right track in the design process. What constitutes good design for you personally? It is many, many things. To me, it's important that it's original and brings something new to the world. It should surprise you positively, and hopefully provoke a little, too. That depends on the brand, of course, but personally I like it to challenge me, particularly when it's based on an original idea and that comes across in the product. It also needs to last. Design-wise it shouldn't be too fashionable and you have to balance quality with design for longevity. If it's too fashionable it'll go out really quickly, kind of like clothing. For furniture, a lot of energy goes into it and it would be hard to spend on quality if people didn't keep the chair for years. We can't guarantee how long it'll be held but [of course] that's our ambition. I like things that are fashionable but it's not always simpatico. It has to be thought of in a longer perspective. The world is flooded with a lot of bad products and so we launch only one collection a year. But I like that; I'd rather launch something I believe in than launch 20 new products a year [and have to discontinue] half [of them] later. That is the company philosophy—our products should have a long lifespan. Is there a designer or architect you'd really like to work with? We spend a lot of energy and time getting to know designers before we work with them so we understand how to best release their creative potential. That's the most important thing for me. When they feel comfortable they can perform well. Our external collaborations should [last longer], like with Jaime [Hayon]. Working with a new designer each year wouldn't make sense [for us]. It's also about chemistry. He's a fantastic guy—50 percent artist and 50 percent designer—so he comes from a very different background with a different approach. It's a good challenge for our view and we have great design discussions. There has to be mutual respect to lift [the relationship] to a new level altogether. In that sense, it has been a great partnership. Additionally, some of the best interpretations of Danish design history come from abroad. Jamie isn't afraid of going close to our heritage. Which designers do you admire? The Boroullec Brothers are really clever and I admire them. They are very skilled. And I also admire Jamie because of his ability to combine art and design. He's really creative and I've never met anyone like him. He can zoom in and out, [thinking] abstractly one second and very organized the next. Its a very unique combination of control and open-mindedness on an abstract level. Some designers are strong only conceptually or otherwise, but he's balanced. He spends lots of time prototyping with us and I think that's different from other manufacturers. We want them to spend time with us because it needs to be a Fritz Hansen piece and a Jaime Hayon piece. The product should be born and raised in Fritz Hansen. The process is really important. That's what is different for us. Jamie has said working with us in Copenhagen is like doing yoga. When he started with the sofa, he was frustrated with the pace [at which we work] but he's learned to enjoy the process. We believe at the end of the day it makes a good piece. What are some of your plans for the future of Fritz Hansen? We'll focus more on laminate wood as we haven't done in a while. We understand that material and process well, so in a few years you'll see more experiments with laminated wood. We will make upholstered furniture, too, of course! We'll also be looking into new materials and technologies where you can create value but still support timeless design. The state of the materials can really make long lasting products. Right now, we 3d print legs and things like that for prototyping. Maybe in five or 10 years everything will change, so we're looking into it for larger production. It's the future and it will change everything. We will also collaborate with Jamie moving forward but there's more in the pipeline. We have a huge catalogue so maybe we'll reinterpret some of the classics. It's all about timing and making pieces relevant for today. What's one of your favorite parts of visiting New York? Walking to the Javits Center along the Highline.
Placeholder Alt Text

Q&A> Design Week with Patrizia Moroso

Patrizia Moroso, art director at Moroso, recently chatted with AN about her impressions of ICFF, working with Patricia Urquiola, and the design house's plans for New York Design Week. What are your impressions of ICFF? It is something very important for the U.S. and for New York. For me, around the fair and outside the pavilions, there's a lot organized in town. The fair is growing. For example, Milan [Furniture Fair] has become so important these years. In Milano, we have something like 3,000 events around design week but this means that people are excited. Now, New York is becoming something like this. You have so much happening around it. The interest and the dialogue between the institutions and the companies and firms can carry on in and around the fair. What is Moroso doing for ICFF? It takes place one month after Milano, so we usually present a few of those releases, [since] that is the big show for us. It's natural to present what we've done in Milano but with another special twist. This year we're transforming the space for Patricia [Urquiola] and in the window [overlooking Greene Street] we're showing the things we've done for Patricia and Kvadrat. We were talking months before the fair so we decided to do something together. Fabric is great for upholstery and we have an installation that was amazing for me. We won an important award in Milano and are happy to say we were the winners this year, so we can show just a glimpse of that here in New York. Because the installation was so big—it took 10 days to install in the [Milan] space—it was not easy to reproduce. Some [challenges were] material, some immaterial. But the exhibition we had [there] was not possible to reproduce here. How did you start working with Patricia Urquiola? About 14 years ago, she was just starting in the design profession. She was managing projects in another big studio in Milano but her name wasn't attached [to her work], as it happens a lot with young designers. A common friend called me to tell me about her; "She's a young designer who's ready to tell her own story. I think you'll be perfect match." I saw her work and energy, and we started working together [pretty much] right away. We are good friends and work together a lot. We are sharing many things, even outside of our profession. Our lives are very intertwined. Is there anything special about showing in New York? The mood here is very happy and bright. It's spring here, [so with the] flowers [in the window] we're trying to recreate that feeling. We painted the showroom in all bright colors, just like space in Milano and we are carrying a mood that we started in Italy. What you see in the window are prototypes that we are presenting but are not yet in production. These are really new things. For example, we are showing our new sofa system, MASSAS, an acronym for Moroso Asymmetric Sofa System Adorably Stitched. Its massive and delicate at once: it's not a common piece of furniture. The other things we will present is our new fabric collection in new colors. Everything is coordinated with the new colors and flowers because the collection is happy. It's not feminine but the approach is very sweet. We want to be optimistic and joyful. For us, it's a new style. What is your favorite thing about coming to New York? The energy, the air—it sparkles! You can come on a rainy day but the morning after everything twinkles. There's something about it. You walk the streets and you're happy. The air in your face is sweet; maybe it's the ocean? The light? It's the atmosphere. If you sit at a cafe and see the people walking, you can see the planet in an hour. You see all the nations here. That, for me, is incredible. When you put all the different people together you have a fantastic melting pot here in the city. It's the power of humanity. I really hope to work more in a country like this, that I love so much. The possibilities here are grand. I really like the thinking here. I meet a lot of architects and designers and everyone is so special. Things are moving fast, projects are growing, it's all very interesting. There's lots of energy in terms of thinking, too. It's all very positive and fast paced.