Posts tagged with "Highline":

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Eavesdrop> Luxury Leather Daddy Lawsuit: Peter Marino in court after allegations of sexism, racism

Luxury New York architect Peter Marino is allegedly being sued for making racist and sexist comments. Deirdre O’Brien, Marino’s former office manager, worked at his eponymous firm for 14 years. On October 26, Marino allegedly “’unleashed a tirade’ against her in front of male executives… He ordered her out, calling her a ‘c–t’ as her back was turned” reported the Post's Page 6. The suit also alleges that this is not an isolated incident, but rather the tipping point for O’Brien, who claims that Marino has a history of making racist comments against his black and Asian employees, as well as calling his female employees offensive names. O’Brien claims that she was fired after issuing a complaint to the HR department, which is what led to her unfair dismissal suit. Marino, known as “fashion’s favorite architect,” has designed hundreds of stores for high-end fashion brands such as Chanel, Christian Dior, Bulgari, and Louis Vuitton, and got his break designing Andy Warhol’s townhouse in 1978. Recently, he designed a 12-story residential building on New York’s Highline with developer Michael Shvo. He is also rather infamously known for his biker-inspired, full-leather get-ups—replete with codpieces. Unfortunately for Marino, not everyone has leather-thick skin when it comes to being called the c-word.
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New York City Council Approves Mega Expansion at Chelsea Market

In spite of angry protests from neighborhood advocates and preservation groups, New York City Council unanimously approved plans Tuesday afternoon to upzone Chelsea Market. The developer, Jamestown Properties, intends on building 300,000-square-feet of office space designed by Studios Architecture that will sit right on top of current Chelsea Market. To move things along in their favor, Jamestown had agreed to give around $12 million to the High Line and $5 million to a fund to build affordable housing, in addition to another $1 million to help launch an internship program at the nearby Fulton Houses. Jamestown called this decision a win for the city’s economy: “As approved today by the New York City Council, the expansion of Chelsea Market will provide an important economic boost to New York City, creating more than 1,200 long-term jobs and 600 construction jobs.” Several local organizations, however, are upset with the outcome.  In an email sent to Chelsea Now, Andrew Berman, Executive Director of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, released this statement: “It’s deeply disappointing that they are allowing a beloved New York City landmark to be disfigured and one of the city’s most congested neighborhoods to be further overdeveloped. In spite of the pleas of the vast majority of this neighborhood’s residents, once again the interests of real estate developers have won out.”
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QUICK CLICKS> Sound Sculpture, Randhurst Main Street, Highline 2.0, & Design Business

Prepared Motors. Included in recent news from BLDGBLOG, Swiss artist Zimoun installs a series of sound sculptures. Each cardboard piece, comprised of micro-mechanisms, projects subtle sound upon interaction. Watch the following video for the installation plus movement. Renovation Take-over. The New York Times reveals that the Randhurst Mall, just outside Chicago in Mt. Prospect, plans to undergo serious renovation. The indoor mid-century shopping center will take on a new look with a $190 million renovation. Expect commercial transformation as the mall goes outdoors, for which it will destroy most original elements in favor of an open air shopping experience. Highline 2.0. If you haven't heard, the second phase of everyone's favorite park, the Highline, opened this week, stretching from 20th to 30th streets through New York's Chelsea neighborhood. The NYC Economic Development Corporation snuck onto the elevated railway before the official opening and has put together a fascinating before-and-after display. The Design Sector. Archinect features a report from the Center for an Urban Future that specifies the capacity of New York City's architecture and design sector and encourages its continued growth. The report reviews the "untapped potential" despite a remarkable 40,470 designers currently based in the Metropolitan area.