Posts tagged with "High Line":

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The sky’s the limit: Bjarke Ingels lands a pair of slanting towers on the High Line

Clearly, higher ups at the Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) are channeling beloved New York rapper Notorious B.I.G.'s approach to urban space. The firm's recent high-profile commissions (hello, Pittsburgh!) reflect Biggie's mantra: "the sky is the limit, and [you] know that you can have what you want, be what you want, have what you want, be what you want," ad infinitum. Now, Ingels is again looking skyward with a new project along New York's High Line. Today, YIMBY reported that BIG has released preliminary renderings for its project on the High Line, at Eleventh Avenue and 17th Street. The eastern tower will rise 28 floors (302 feet) adjacent to its 38 story (402 feet) western sibling. The buildings will feature 300 apartments (most with two and three bedrooms), retail space, and a hotel. Apartments will sit above a three-level, 150,000-square-foot hotel, and 50,00 square feet of ground floor retail. HFZ Capital paid an astonishing $870 million for the site last summer. The tower's aggressive diagonal cut will allow views of the High Line from the southern side of the western tower. The project's expected completion date is 2018. Just keep pressin' on, BIG. Just as newsworthy, perhaps: Why has it taken BIG so long to land a High Line commission alongside fellow starchitects Zaha Hadid, Frank Gehry, Jean Nouvel, Norman Foster, and countless others?
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Aim High, Get Low: New “Lowline” linear park eyed in the Bronx

Call it High Line fever: since the first leg of James Corner and Diller Scofidio + Renfro's High Line debuted in 2009, High Line–like projects have popped up all over the city and across the country. Now, not ten miles from the original, the Bronx may be slated for its very own rail-to-park conversion. Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr. has asked Mayor Bill de Blasio to transform an unused slice of below grade train track in Mott Haven into a "lowline." The block-long site, bounded by Brook Avenue, East 156th Street, St. Ann's Avenue, and East 150th Street, is owned by CSX. In order to reclaim the space for parkland, the city would need to buy or seize the land from the railroad company. On a visit to the site in September, Mayor de Blasio deplored the condition of the trash strewn corridor, which doubles as a homeless encampment. Soon after the mayor's visit, city workers cleared out the belongings of the residents and removed debris from the site. Sandwiched between schools and their athletic fields, the lowline would be adjacent to mixed income housing projects Melrose Commons and Via Verde.
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As starchitect-designed condos pop-up along the High Line, Chelsea’s art galleries look for a new home

As rents go up in a city succumbing to gentrification, the few remaining art galleries in Manhattan's Chelsea neighborhood have either left or are looking set to leave. This however, is nothing new for the art galleries of New York, according to Stuart Siegel, senior vice president at real-estate broker CBRE Group who specializes in Chelsea. The galleries have been been victims of their own success before. "The galleries put Chelsea on the map. Then the world followed them," Siegel told Crain's. Now, high-end development along the High Line is responsible for chasing many galleries away. Crain's went on to note that only "high-end emporiums" such as Gagosian Gallery, Gladstone Gallery, and David Zwirner—all of which own their own buildings—remain. They have learned the lessons of the past when art galleries previously "revitalized" Soho, only to be forced out due to increasing rent prices. The hike has even affected Jeff Koons, the world’s most expensive living artist at auction according to Crain's. Koons plans to move out within the next two years. Developments from Zaha Hadid, Foster+PartnersFrank Gehry, and others have popped up all along the High Line, and will only further the gentrification of the area as rent prices continue to increase. Troy McMullen at the Financial Times commented that "at present there are more than 20 new developments – with more than 2,700 new units – planned either near, alongside or under the High Line, according to New York City’s Department of Buildings, making this narrow, 2.3km-long strip of land one of the highest concentrations of new architecture and property development in the US."
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Voila! Zaha Hadid reinvents construction scaffolding with Allongé at her High Line condo tower

Should you be strolling along the High Line during the next couple weeks, you may encounter a temporary construction shed at the site of Zaha Hadid's condominium project going up at 520 West 28th Street. No typical plywood-and-pipe-scaffolding this, however. A quasi-tunnel of translucent fabric stretches more than 100 feet along the elevated park. And it even has a name. As reported by Curbed NY, the shelter is has been dubbed christened Allongé. (We'll save you the trouble of finding your Larousse; that word translates as "lengthened.") Reassuringly, this Zaha-designed enclosure is sheltered by a code-compliant structure that will protect passers-by from any real falling debris.
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A competing vision to James Corner’s Seattle waterfront plan is going before City Council August 17

From Boston to San Francisco and cities in between, increasing the quality of livable and usable urban space has become a hot issue. Waterfront redevelopment, highway removal, and linear park creation (and activation) are leading the way. For Seattle, that means redoing the waterfront by replacing the deteriorating seawall, removing the earthquake damaged Alaskan Way Viaduct, and building a tunnel. When these projects are complete, it also means carrying out James Corner's massive over $1 billion waterfront plan with proposed features like a public promenade, lookouts, a dedicated bike path, and more, that would wind along the western edge of the city from Belltown and south to Pioneer Square. Other related projects also include a Pike Place Market addition, an aquarium expansion, and Pike-Pine improvements, among others. But a new kid on the block is trying to shake things up. Enter Initiative-123. Seattle-based Kate Martin (who ran for mayor in 2013) is leading a competing vision to the James Corner plan. The opposing proposal calls for a mile-long, six-acre elevated High Line style park. The idea is to reinforce and convert a southern portion of the viaduct into a promenade and then extend it, rebuilding an entirely new portion as a dedicated haven to walkers and cyclists. "Elevated parks are at the forefront of urban open spaces and delays in the unimproved plan have created an opportunity for a re-imagining of Seattle’s waterfront," reads the I-123 policy. "The city’s unimproved waterfront plan attempts to mix commercial, transportation, and pedestrian space into an end product that doesn’t meet any of these users’ needs." The proposal is gaining traction, recently getting enough signatures (over 20,638) to go before the city council on August 17. With the council expected to reject it, I-123 would then get put on the ballot, and possibly be up for a citizen vote next summer. And should the ballot measure pass, it would establish a public development authority. If this happens, "it is going to create serious problems, with the millions of dollars that have already been spent,” City Council member Sally Bagshaw told the Seattle Times last week. For now, we wait.
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Peter Marino unveils an unusually restrained High Line condo project

In the insane race to build more and more luxury condos in New York City, the High Line is staking its claim as the scrappy younger sibling of Billionaire’s Row on 57th Street. The latest addition will be an 8-unit, 47,000 square-foot building by “the leather daddy of luxury,” Peter Marino. The new building will be developed by Victor Homes and Michael Shvo. It will be located at 239 Tenth Avenue, at 24th Street, right near the High Line. At first glance, we were nervous that this new structure would abut one of the best buildings on the ‘Line, Neil Denari’s HL23. However, the building in the rendering's background faked us out—it's actually a very similar building to HL23 at 245 10th Avenue, which straddles the corner lot that Marino’s boxy structure will occupy. What makes this building odd is that it is not a typical Marino design. Usually, “the leather daddy of luxury” dispenses over-the-top, opulent designs that are perverse in their subversion and skirting of the logic of efficient detailing. The initial rendering of 239 Tenth shows little in common with Marino's flashy and very luxurious interiors and retail spaces. Instead, the facade appears as a flat black grid with uneven yet predictable fenestrations. We'll be waiting to see the details.
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Rem Koolhaas is the latest starchitect to join the High Line scene

It was always a question of when—not if—Rem Koolhaas would join the starchitect party alongside New York City's High Line. With the third phase of the popular park open, and multiple splashy projects rising alongside it, the New York Post is reporting that Koolhaas' time has come: he has been hired by The Related Companies to design a building on West 18th Street. Related is also developing a nearby building by Koolhaas' former student and then partner, Zaha Hadid. While there are very few details about Koolhaas' new building, it will certainly be significant given that it is the world-renowned architect's first major project in New York City—a city which he, of course, explored in depth over 30 years ago in Delirious New York. Rem's High Line tower won't be the only project his firm, OMA, will be working on in the New York City region. Last year, Koolhaas' team was selected as one of the major winners of HUD's Rebuild by Design competition.  
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Video> James Carpenter’s glassy Meatpacking office tower on the High Line gets newly rendered

Last week, AN took a walk along the High Line to check in on all the new development happening right alongside New York City's popular park. One of the structures we saw steadily rising was 860 Washington Street, a 10-story glass office building by James Carpenter Design Associates. The project has been in the works since 2009 but is slated to finally welcome commercial tenants this October. With the upcoming opening, the developer has released new renderings of the project on a glossy website and a video of James Carpenter explaining his very glassy design. According to the building's website, 860 Washington is where "glass meets green."
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Wait, what? New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has never been on the High Line

When the final phase of the High Line opened in September, Mayor de Blasio was not there to celebrate—neither was his Parks Commissioner Mitchell Silver, reported the New York Times. The mayor was off to Pittsburgh that day and Silver apparently had a scheduling conflict so deputies for both men were sent instead. But if the mayor would have made it to the opening, it would have been his first time on the High Line. Ever. "I am a fan of it,” the mayor reportedly said when asked about his absence at the park. “I think it’s done a lot of good for the city, but I haven’t visited.” This is surprising for two reasons. First, the obvious: he’s the mayor of New York and the High Line is one of the city’s most celebrated and beloved destinations. It's even featured in his administration’s promotional video for the city's bid to host the 2016 Democratic National Convention at the Barclays Center. And, second, if you’ve visited the High Line recently, you know the place is packed—it seems that every single human being on planet earth is up there alongside you. Last year, nearly five million people strolled across the old rail line. So why wasn't the mayor among the millions? It partly comes down to politics. As the Times explained: “[The High Line] is also associated with the themes Mr. de Blasio railed against in his campaign for mayor, when he denounced the 'almost colonial dynamic' between a gentrifying Manhattan and the city’s other boroughs. The park has attracted a string of luxury buildings to the Far West Side and is a cherished cause of wealthy Manhattanites in Mr. Bloomberg’s circles." [h/t Curbed.]
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Unveiled> Singaporean Architect Brings Wavy Design to the High Line

Singaporean architect Soo K. Chan of SCDA Architects is the latest to join an internationally renowned group of architects building along New York's High Line in Chelsea. Chan isn't settling for just one building, however. Two new buildings are set to rise just blocks from towers by Norman Foster and Zaha Hadid, and feature differing aesthetics that tap into the luxury market that has skyrocketed in the area. The first of the two, 515 High Line at 515 West 29th Street, will stand 11 stories tall. The tower is defined on two sides by rippling glass fins from its podium to its top. The tower is predominantly clad in glass, but renderings show a blank segment of the building facing the High Line that could be covered with murals, adding to the already robust arts offerings along the linear park. "Soo Chan's stunning loft-style interiors evoke an understated appeal and modernity, and the exterior facade, with steel and glass that appears to curve—as inspired by the High Line's bend at 29th Street—will incorporate the High Line both for onlookers and residents in a way that no other property will," Joseph Beninati, of Bauhouse Group, the project's developer, said in a statement. According to the Bauhouse Group, the homes in the $125 million development will range from 2,100–4,400 square feet and will be priced between $5 million and $25 million. There are also three penthouses that have 22-foot-tall ceilings. The property is expected to open in 2015 and is directly across the High Line from Chan’s other condo project—the Soori High Line at 522 West 29th Street. That structure is also 11 stories, but has a more restrained facade that is defined more by modern straight lines than a wavy skin. The units inside the property, though, are anything but restrained—16 of Soori’s 27 units have private, heated pools featuring glass walls on the street facade. This is obviously only the latest set of flashy buildings set to rise on the High Line. Last week, Crain’s reported that piece of a parking lot next to the High Line could be next to get the condo treatment. “That portion can accommodate a 390-foot-tall residential tower about 440,000 square feet in size, making it one of the largest development sites in that area up for grabs in recent years,” Crain’s reported. The piece of land could sell for over $400 million.
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Studio Gang’s New York City “Solar Carve” Tower Moving Forward in Smaller Form

Studio Gang’s first New York City tower appears to be moving forward, albeit a little shorter than originally envisioned. Initial plans called for a 213-foot tall, 180,000-square-foot office tower—known as the “Solar Carve”—that would have been 34 percent larger than what is currently allowed on the site. After it became clear that wasn't going to fly with the NYC Board of Standards and Appeals (BSA), the Carve's developer, William Gottlieb Real Estate, withdrew its application leaving the fate of the project in jeopardy. But fear not Jeanne Gang fans, there's good news. Today, the BSA voted in favor of the developer’s revised application (its fourth), which does not request any additional bulk at the site. The Board also approved the developer's request for “a relatively minor height and setback waiver." “We were excited to receive the Zoning and Setback Waiver from the BSA,” said Jeanne Gang, in a statement to AN. “This important decision will preserve the design and enhance the experience along the High Line for residents of New York and the greater community of visitors to the site. The Solar Carve Tower project is ongoing with an anticipated design completion in 2015.” That's certainly an ambitious deadline, but the Gang team can now watch from up close as the Chicago-based firmed recently opened an office in Manhattan.
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High time for a High Line: Sydney Breaks Ground on New Elevated Park

Following it's opening in 2009, urban planners all over the world have been keen on acquiring their own versions of New York's much-lauded High Line. Sydney is the latest city to enter the fray, selecting a 500-meter stretch of abandoned railway as a foundation for the Goods Line, an urban park and public space, replete with bike paths, study pods and outdoor workspaces catering to local students. The construction is a two stage process. Work on the Northern phase will commence this month and connect the Powerhouse Museum to Frank Gehry's confusingly named and fairly unpleasant addition to the UTS campus, the Chau Chak Wing Building. The second portion will reshape an existing pedestrian walkway and is set to begin following the projected November 2014 completion date of Goods Line North. The project arrives with a promotional video, offering a sleek fly-through of the space as the requisite techno soundtrack pulsates gently in the background. The Sydney Harbour Foreshore Authority is leading the initiative, working to realize a design by ASPECT Studios and Choi Ropiha Fighera(CHROFI). A feasibility study regarding potential further extension is currently underway as the team mulls the possibility of continuing the Goods Line into other portions of Sydney's Cultural Ribbon.