Posts tagged with "Hanson LA":

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Pair of striking apartment blocks coming to L.A.’s Arts District from HansonLA

Los Angeles-based architects HansonLA and developers Maxxam Enterprises have unveiled renderings for a pair of eye-catching apartment blocks slated for the Los Angeles Arts District. Together, the two schemes could bring a combined 405 housing units to the booming neighborhood just east of downtown. The first, dubbed 676 Mateo, would bring 185 live-work units and 23,380 square feet of commercial space to a site located at the intersection of Mateo and Sixth Streets. According to the renderings, the complex would be anchored at the corner of the site by a sculptural eight-story tower wrapped in reflective metal skin. The eight-story tower features rounded window openings and is shown supported by a monolithic pier that would allow the ground floor of the site to remain as outdoor space. The covered plaza is capped by a reflective ceiling and would make up part of the project’s 15,000 square feet of open space. It is shown in the renderings flanked by expanses of storefronts. The tower would be joined on the site by a pair of brick-clad apartment blocks that feature more normative configurations, including rectilinear punched openings and projecting balconies. Eleven percent of the units at 676 Mateo will be set aside as affordable homes. A second development—dubbed 1100 E. 5th Street—would be located just a few blocks over and would bring another 220 live-work apartments to the area. Renderings for that project call for an eight-story apartment complex wrapped in square-shaped punched openings and metal paneling. The building will feature projecting triangular balconies and inset rectilinear loggia spaces. The complex will also feature 44,530 square feet of commercial areas as well as 23,000 square feet of open spaces, Urbanize.la reports. Like 676 Mateo, the 1100 E. 5th Street complex will set aside 11 percent of its dwellings as affordable housing. The complexes join a growing list of new, form-forward developments coming to the Arts District, including a 320-unit complex from SteinbergHart and Shimoda Design Group, an angular 12-story tower from Johnson Fain, and a 260-unit gridded complex by BIG.
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City Market of Los Angeles project approved by L.A. Planning Department

A plan crafted by developers City Market of Los Angeles and architects Hanson LA to drastically reshape a large section of the Los Angeles Fashion District in Downtown Los Angeles was unanimously approved by the Los Angeles City Planning Commission (LACPC) yesterday afternoon. In all, the roughly ten-acre development includes 16 development sites that will ultimately render up to 945 residential units, a 201-key hotel, 312,000 square feet of educational and creative offices, 225,000 square feet of retail spaces, and 272,000 square feet commercial office areas if built according to current plans. Hanson LA is serving as the master plan architect for the project, and the firm has developed the site plan for the project as well as written design guidelines for the development that will guide “what we do for the next 100 years” on the site, Doug Hanson told The Architect's Newspaper (AN). Hanson, a principal at Hanson LA, said the plan includes establishing a site-spanning amenity level roughly 20 feet off the street that will connect various blocks by spanning over the sidewalk. The elevated park is set at the height of neighboring industrial structures in order to maintain a contextual relationship with the neighborhood. The terrace, according to Hanson, will “speak to the history of the site” as an industrial district populated by warehouse structures. The designers hope that the elevated park spaces can provide much-needed public seating and gathering spaces for the neighborhood. The two-block-wide development will be bisected along the ground floor by a series of retail-lined pedestrian streets, with the terrace level above spanning between new structures to create an outdoor mezzanine promenade. The designers released a set of new and updated renderings for the project in anticipation of the LACPC meeting that highlight the multifaceted urban dynamic the firm has sought to articulate across the site. Site design for the project has been guided by a desire to have “quality architecture” populate public and semi-public open spaces while maintaining view corridors toward iconic downtown vistas. “These aren’t massive, big buildings,” Hanson explained as he described the articulated and setback low- and high-rise placeholder forms that show up in the renderings. Structures will ultimately be designed by a variety of architectural teams according to Hanson’s guidelines and will rise from a single story up to 454 feet in height. The plans envision a sizable portion of the site dedicated to housing a satellite campus for a local university as well as a 744-seat multiplex theater, Urbanize.la reported. The developers are also seeking to transform the complex into a so-called “sign district,” a local designation that allows for the installation of large-scale, electrified advertisement and mural billboards like those coming to nearby areas. The Skid Row–adjacent development does not feature an affordable housing component but will pay over $11 million toward a funded dedicated to preserving and creating new affordable housing in the neighborhood. The project will next be reviewed by the Los Angeles City Council for final approval. A timeline for the project’s implementation has not been released, but the developers envision a roughly 20-year construction timeline for the development, depending on market conditions.
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New renderings revealed for twin condo towers in Downtown Los Angeles

The architects and developers behind the new 2-million-square-foot Circa complex have revealed new renderings for their partially-completed project in Downtown Los Angeles’s South Park neighborhood. The project, designed by architects Harley Ellis Devereaux with interiors by Hanson LA, will bring 648 apartments to the neighborhood in a pair of 35-story high rounded, twin towers. Those units—located above a 48,000-square foot, five-story retail and parking podium—will be arranged in one-, two-, and three-bedroom configurations and will range in size from 700 to 3,800 square feet. The towers will be connected by a landscaped pool patio and cabana areas located atop the podium. Additionally, according to the new renderings released by the developer, the towers will also feature streamlined floor-to-ceiling glass curtain wall exteriors. The buildings’ eastern and western facades also contain protruding exterior balconies. A construction camera overlooking the site shows the podium level and towers’ structural components partially completed, with the towers rising out of the ground and nearly reaching their apex. The complex is located along a booming strip of development that includes a collection of at least 15 other new high-rise housing towers that are either undergoing approval or under construction, including Metropolis (four towers), Oceanwide Plaza (three towers), 1020 South Figueroa (three towers), Fig+Pico (two towers), and Olympia (three towers). These towers, funded predominantly by foreign capital and located directly across from the Staples Center, L.A. Live complex, and Los Angeles Convention Center are due to change not only the character of the areas immediately surrounding these venues—many of the proposed projects feature large-scale, electronic signs for advertisements and art—but also the city as a whole by introducing a large collection of luxury and market-rate apartments, condominiums, and hotels. Circa is due to open in early 2018. For more information on the project, see the Circa website.
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Sunday> Explore the transformation of Los Angeles’ Broadway with The Architect’s Newspaper

You may have noticed a few articles in our pages about the development of Los Angeles' long underexploited street, Broadway, which is experiencing a phenomenal resurgence. Now it's time to take a look at the progress made so far. This Sunday, June 29, AN is co-organizing a (second) tour of the thoroughfare with the A+D Museum, guided by AN West Coast Editor Sam Lubell and LA institution Mike the Poet. The event will stop at some of Broadway's greatest architectural treasures—including the Bradbury Building, the Los Angeles and Rialto Theaters, the Wurlitzer Building, and the Herald-Examiner— and it will look at its future, including revamped and widened sidewalks, new towers and businesses, and even a streetcar. Tickets range from $5 to $20 and are available from the A+D Museum.