Posts tagged with "Hamptons":

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Norman Jaffe’s Long Island home gets a modern restoration

Norman Jaffe’s iconic Long Island houses were designed in the 1970s and ’80s, when the island’s East End went from a beach getaway of primarily small, nonwinterized summer bungalows to a posh resort of gigantic, ostentatious mansions. Though Jaffe was displeased with the change, it’s hard not to think his houses unwittingly anticipated or precipitated the shift. Along with Andrew Geller and Horace Gifford, Jaffe made the island a leading location for experimental architecture. His material palette of weathered wood, taken from the farmhouses of the area, along with his bold, striking forms, created the Hamptons look. The literal flatness of the island and its extraordinary quality of light, bouncing off the surrounding sea, provided the perfect tableaux for a holiday architecture that wanted to stand out and be seen. By the time Jaffe drowned swimming off of a Hampton beach in 1993, he had designed more than 50 houses on Long Island. While some have been torn down, there are still dozens that dot the region and are beloved and carefully maintained by their owners. In 2014, his Schlachter beach house in Bridgehampton was restored by a respectful owner. More recently, Jaffe’s own 1986 house has received a careful modernization that shows perfectly how to update and at the same time improve an iconic work of architecture. Nick Martin of Martin Architects, a Hamptons-based architect and builder, found the house for a client and set to work redesigning and restoring it. The original residence was a single structure, but over time, Jaffe added three additional outbuildings surrounding a swimming pool, like so many other farm compounds on Long Island. Martin removed a seldom-used second-floor balcony in the main house, merged the space into a new master bedroom, enlarged the living room by joining it with the original foyer, and added new public and private entry points on a north/south axis with the pool. In order to capture the special light of the Hamptons, he dramatically enlarged the windows facing the swimming pool courtyard. As in most modernizations of older houses, the kitchen and bathroom received the most upgrades. The house is now the definition of the perfect Hamptons summer home in 2018. Its striking shingled facade, with a large sloping roof and prominent central chimney cleared of an overgrown pergola, now stands out without overwhelming its site, as so many contemporary Hampton houses do today.
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2017 Best of Design Awards for Mixed Use

2017 Best of Design Awards for Mixed Use: North Main Architect: Bates Masi + Architects Location: East Hampton, New York This owner-occupied architecture office and law firm is built for longevity, enhancing the property’s value with durable materials, flexible infrastructure, and adaptable spatial organization. In accordance with vernacular building traditions, simple forms and naturally weather-resistant materials are employed. Copper shingles will last through the next century, showing the effects of weathering without succumbing to them. Similarly, the cedar-plank siding will endure despite patination, bolstered by an innovative fastening method of custom stainless steel clips. These clips grip the edges of each board instead of penetrating it with fasteners, the typical first point of failure. The interior walls follow the same system, and the boards can be easily removed and replaced, providing access to the skeleton of the house. “There's wonderful layers of temporality in this project, from the anticipated patination and wear of materials to certain details—like clips and hooks—that ensure the flexibility of the spaces.” —Irene Sunwoo, director of exhibitions, GSAPP (juror) Structural, Civil Engineer: S. L. Maresca & Associates Consulting Engineers Metalwork: Cedar Design Woodwork: Peragine Millwork Windows and Doors: Arcadia Roof planters: Green Roof Outfitters   Honorable Mention Project: Brickell City Centre Architect: Arquitectonica Location: Miami Brickell City Centre presents an outdoor retail environment without boundaries. The multiblock mixed-use development totals 5 million square feet, with a three-level mall, a hotel, two residential towers, and two office towers. The project focuses on connectivity and sustainable design best exemplified by the Climate Ribbon™—an elevated trellis that recycles energy and shelters visitors.
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55 Warren: One Scoop with Glitz on Top

Last week, we took a trip around the block from the AN office to go to an open house at 55 Warren hosted by Legrand, the French systems management company. While we were impressed with all the gizmos and glitzy gadgets, it was OCV Architect's clever renovation of the old cast-iron building that grabbed our attention. That's not to say that Legrand didn't impress. Vantage, a subsidiary of Legrand, came in after the walls were painted and moldings affixed before fitting setting up the control network for everything from the shades to security by using radio and wifi. No plaster was destroyed in the effort. An iPhone app allows owners to adjust their Tribeca lighting while in the Hamptons. The glitz factor came with a presentation of Legrand's latest acquisition, Bticino, the Italian fixture company. Their Swarovski-encrusted light switches are tempered by more tame choices of wenge, granite and marble. But back to the architecture... OCV received the necessary Landmark approvals to scoop out the center of this historic structure to create a courtyard light well. Often, these old industrial buildings are quite dark at the center of the floorplate. While losing 2,050 square feet might make the any developer cringe, OCV replaced square footage by plopping it back on top in the form of a $14 million penthouse that's set back far enough from the facade to appease Landmarks.