Posts tagged with "Ground Breaking":

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San Francisco Mission Park construction underway

After multiple delays, March 17 marked the beginning of construction for a new park in San Francisco, Mission Park, at Folsom and 17th Streets. The $5.2 million project is currently mostly surface parking. The park plan—32,000 square feet—boasts a variety of community, teaching, and learning amenities. There’s a large lawn, a water feature, performance and classroom space, and community and demonstration gardens. There are other cool features: a fence with espaliered fruit trees, a children’s playground, and adult fitness equipment. The target opening date is the end of this year or early next year. Eventually, a housing project to the north will fill the other half of the parking lot. The San Francisco Recreation & Parks Department has been busy with over 100 San Francisco projects in progress. There were updates to the 14-acre Dolores Park in the Mission. The south side of the park reopened this January, following updates to the north side completed last June. The $20.5 million renovations were funded by the 2008 Clean and Safe Neighborhood Parks Bond, bringing the first improvements to the park since it was created a century ago. The updates brought improved paths, tennis court renovations, and expanded trash facilities. There are more San Francisco parks under development, including a future park site at the Francisco Reservoir in Russian Hill. Here is a list of San Francisco parks open to the public. and another list with more info on future park sites and how the city acquires new land.
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Construction Underway at Norman Foster’s 610 Lexington Avenue Tower

Norman Foster has broken ground on a skinny residential tower in Midtown Manhattan. Situated adjacent to the 1958 Seagram Building on the site of a former YWCA, Foster + Partners' 61-story white luxury tower at 610 Lexington Avenue will dwarf Mies van der Rohe's 38-story bronze-clad landmark. "It’s not simply about our new building, but about the composition it creates together with one of the 20th century’s greatest," said Foster + Partners' Chris Connell in a statement. "In contrast to Seagram’s dark bronze, our tower will have a pure white, undulating skin. Its proportions are almost impossibly slim and the views will be just incredible."
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ground breaking: chinese “ghost mall” city gets another mega-mall

In 2005, the doors to the New South China Mall first opened, promising a new age of Chinese consumerism and signaling the rise of the middle class. Located outside Dongguan, an industrial city located in the rapidly-growing Pearl River Delta with a population comparable to New York’s, the nearly 10 million-square-foot mall was the largest in the world in terms of leasable space. The developer, Chinese instant noodle tycoon Alex Hu, expected 100,000 daily shoppers, but the crash-strapped factory workers who populate the nearby metropolis never bothered to make the  2.5-hour trek to the overgrown shopping center, and so 8 years later 99 percent of the mall’s 2,350 retail outlets are still vacant. In the wake of this failure, a new developer, the Dongguan Minying Real Estate Development Company, has hired California-based architecture firms 5+Design and SWA to design yet another mega-sized mall in the rapidly growing city, this time with a few important adjustments that the team hopes will make their project a success. Developers of the 11 million-square-foot Dongguan International Trade Center (DITC) hope to succeed where the New South China Mall failed by offering an accessible downtown location with integrated public transit, lush landscaping, and a diverse, mixed-use program. Situated at the intersection of several public transit lines in the center of the city, the 1 million-square-foot site will be connected to multiple subway and bus routes, as well as provide pedestrian and bicycle access to offer an enticing alternative to the traditional car-based mall. The development will be composed of five towers gathered around a compact, 6-story retail complex. The towers, while all rendered in reflective glass and metal paneling, each have their own distinct design and program. The tallest of the five, coming in at 1,409 feet, will be the 25th tallest building in the world and contain offices and a club, while the others will house offices, a hotel, creative technology studios, residential spaces, and a bank. At the center of the DITC will be the retail center, containing a wide spectrum of tenants to cater to the city’s economically diverse population, as well as a below-ground market hall, exhibition spaces, an ice rink, amphitheater, rooftop park, health club, and a 15-screen cinema. But, still, many may ask, why build a 11 million-square-foot mall in a city with an empty 10 million square foot mall? According to 5+Design principal Michael Ellis, a lot has changed in the years since the New South China Mall opened, and Dongguan is ready for something new. “There is a new generation in China that likes the conveniences of great shops and dining experiences near where they live,” Ellis told China Daily USA. “You see that in the US too, with young people moving to downtown Los Angeles for the same reason. It’s a worldwide trend, but new development is happening so quickly and at a large-enough scale in China that it allows us to operate freely there.” Construction of the DITC is set to be completed by 2015.
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Porsche Design Group Breaks Ground on Miami Condo Tower With a Car Elevator

The architectural climate of Miami has been red hot recently, with dozens of towers being built by some of the world’s leading architects—including all-stars Zaha Hadid, Rem Koolhaas, Bjarke Ingels, and Herzog & de Meuron. And with the city's reputation for high-design parking garages, it's no secret that the Magic City has a soft spot for the automobile. Now, a new designer very familiar with the road aims to break into the Miami sky. The Wall Street Journal reported that Porsche Design Group broke ground in April on a 60-story luxury residential tower, which will feature an automobile elevator allowing each tenant to park their luxury vehicle right beside their living room. The 132-unit tower is Porsche’s first venture into residential development, and it seems to be working out, with half the units already reported sold. The building’s kicker, the car elevator, may already be familiar to Manhattanites since architect Annabelle Selldorf introduced the high-end concept to her 200 Eleventh Avenue tower in 2010. Tenants at the 641-foot, ultra-luxury Porsche Design Tower Miami will be able to pull their cars into the building’s central elevator shaft, ride up to their floor, and park in a “sky-garage” directly connected to their unit—without ever leaving their car. But be prepared to pay for that privilege. Units range from 4,200 to 17,000 square feet and will cost between $4.5 million and $25 million. In addition to the lift, the building will contain other lavish features for lovers of luxury and auto-enthusiasts alike, including a plunge pool, ocean-view ballroom, outdoor kitchens, spas, and a “car concierge” given the duty to monitor and maintain residents’ high-end rides. Even the building’s website is exclusive, forcing users to register to catch a glimpse of the renderings.
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BIG Groundbreaking on Faroe Islands

The renderings just keep coming. And, after a recent groundbreaking, a building will too. With projects on their way in New York, Phoenix, Washington, D.C., Miami, Paris, Copenhagen,and Tianjin, China, Bjarke Ingels has just broken ground again, this time on the Faroe Islands off the coast of Denmark, where, in typical BIG fashion, he will lay down the largest building on the small, self-governing archipelago. Located on a hillside outside the capital-town of Torshavn, the new Marknagil Education Center will gather three of the country’s educational institutions under one roof. The building will house more than 1,200 students and 300 teachers—from Faroe Islands Gymnasium, Torshavn Technical College, and the Business College of Faroe Islands—within a white, cylindrical vortex. The building focuses inward while integrating itself into the landscape, centering around an open rotunda designed as a gathering point for cross-disciplinary exchanges, while reaching out into the surrounding hills with rectangular projections. BIG has released a substantial collection of renderings for the project, a selection of which can be viewed below.
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Inlet Assumed

Yesterday, in a quiet ceremony attended by Mayor Bloomberg, the city broke ground on the first phase of Bushwick Inlet Park. Situated between North 9th and 10th streets along the Williamsburg waterfront, this initial stage of construction will comprise a synthetic turf athletic playing field. Turns out I was also on the Williamsburg waterfront at the time, on a tour of that neighborhood with photographer and AN Editorial Intern Victoria Monjo, capturing images for our forthcoming developers issue (see last year's here). One of the images we captured was of Bushwick Inlet itself, which sits three or four blocks to the north of where the festivities were taking place. Eventually, park construction will extend all the way to this placid cove, where, according to the Parks Department's initial plan, there will be a beach, planted terraces, and a performance garden, whatever that is. See the view from Kent Avenue after the jump.