Posts tagged with "green roofs":

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Product> Finds from the Floor at Greenbuild 2013

In the midst of Greenbuild's International Conference & Expo, held from November 18–22 in Philadelphia, AN sought out the newest and most innovative sustainable building products. We found attractive new finishes and furnishings, including a new chair derived from carbon polymers, and a plethora of building components that aim to harness the Earth's energy for optimal building performance. Green Roofing Xero Flor America This vegetated green roofing solution (above) rolls out in a mat system for easy application, as well as rapid access for repairs. Each 40-inch wide panel is comprised of a root barrier, drain mat, water retention fleece, growing medium, and pre-vegetated layer of sedum. Also known as stonecrop, each order is grown in one of Xero Flor's six regional fields, so living roofs are acclimated to the installation environment and contribute to local LEED credits. Ecoflex Mortise Lock Assa Abloy The Ecoflex Mortise Lock runs on only 10 Watts of energy, whereas standard electrified locks draw nearly twice the wattage. Used as a stand-alone electronic access control or in conjunction with a wall reader, the reduced power draw cuts operating costs and its actuator reduces the risk of failure from voltage drops. Basotect BASF Basotect is made from an open-cell melamine resin foam, a thermoset polymer that does not contain mineral fibers. It is comprised of 99 percent air for maximum sound absorbancy and low density (read: lightweight) in corporate, education, civic, and institutional applications. Smog-Eating Tile Boral Suitable for both commercial and residential applications, concrete roofing tiles feature an embedded finish that converts nitrogen oxide from the air into inert compounds. For a recommended 3-inch headlap, approximately 89 tiles will cover 100 square feet. Six colorways are available in three profiles. Fleece-BACK PVC Membrane Carlisle SynTec Systems To bolster durability and the PVC membrane's puncture resistance, a layer of fleece backing adds thickness up to 135 mils and improves wind-uplift performance when bonded to an adhesive. Specified as part of a comprehensive roofing system, the membrane can help contribute to LEED points, as it did on the South Terrace of the David L. Lawrence Convention Center in Pittsburgh. AirRenew CertainTeed CertainTeed's new gypsum board features embedded air purifying technology that captures formaldehyde and other aldehydes, converts them into inert compounds, and stores the particulates within the board for 75 years. Water-based acrylic and epoxy paints or breathable wallpaper will not affect efficacy, and AirRenew can be recycled at the end of its useful life. Enverge Cavity Wall Firestone Building Products Firestone adapted its polyisocyanite roofing technology and its insular properties for the vertical surfaces of a building with the Enverge Cavity Wall system. When combined, a suite of products—including a continuous insulation exterior wall insulation, air and vapor barrier, and thru-wall flashing—stops thermal bridging and optimizes building envelope performance according to ASHRAE standards. Reveal Glass Guardian Industries Guardian Industries' switchable glass features an interlayer of liquid crystals laminated between two sheets of glass that, when exposed to an electrical current, reconfigures floating molecules into a transparent grid pattern that appears clear to the naked eye. When the system is off, the molecules rest in a disorganized, natural state that lends opacity to the glass. The line is available in any of Guardian's color offerings, standard textures, and Berman Glass editions. 1630 SS ISO Kawneer Kawneer addresses the growing frequency of high-impact weather systems with a curtain wall designed to withstand hurricane and tornado conditions. The system has withstood blast mitigation testing, ASTM testing, and met building code standards for Florida's hurricane-prone Miami-Dade County, all with a reduced U-factor to meet current energy code demands. Grazie with AirCarbon KI KI's Grazie stacking chair was reimagined in a bio-based polymer(above)—AirCarbon—from California-based Newlight Technologies. A patented production method isolates carbon molecules from naturally occurring chemical compounds, converts them to a liquid state, and bonds them with polymers for a carbon-negative thermoplastic that can be substituted for oil-based plastics. Benchmark Kingspan Panels finished in ACM, MCM, ceramic, brick, and more feature polyisocyanates to eliminate thermal bridging, and a built-in vapor barrier for an air-tight building skin. Kingspan has developed EPDs for all Benchmark panels, which are also UL listed. MagnaShade MechoSystems Mechosystem's interior daylight management—in both manual and automated systems—is available in lengths as long as 40 feet for uninterrupted glare and heat gain mitigation, and the elimination of light gaps. A slim profile on the 6 1/2-inch housing cassette can be installed flush within a ceiling or soffit, or wall mounted. PermaLED Area Light Osram Sylvania Operating at 90, 140, or 200 Watts of power, the PermaLED luminaire for outdoor use generates a 57 percent energy savings when compared to HID lamps. Available with a standard photosensor or a dual-technology motion and photocontrol sensor, the latter provides up to 10kV surge protection. SPEEDHIDE zero PPG This topcoat paint contains no VOCs, formaldehyde, crystalline silica or ethylene glycol. Anti-microbial properties also help inhibit growth of mold and mildew on paint film. SPEEDHIDE zero is GreenGuard Gold certified and meets standards for California's South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD). Harmony Sherwin-Williams Once this interior acrylic latex paint dries, a propriety chemical compound neutralizes aldehydes in the surrounding environment without the presence of a catalyst. Harmony, and 50 percent of Sherwin-Williams' paint offerings, have been certified GreenGuard Gold and contribute to LEED points under Version 4 revisions. ThermaCork Eco Supply Made from the bark of the quercus suber tree, ThermaCork features the inherent dimensional stability, water resistance, fire retardant properties, and acoustical isolation of cork, without additives. To form panels, the sap of the cork bark, or suberin, is heated to a liquid state and, once cooled, binds particles in place. The panels can also be applied as insulation.    
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Product> Water Retention Materials That Are Happy When Wet

The following selections can substantially aid in stormwater management, along roofs, walls, plazas, and more. Hybrid Green Roof System LiveRoof This modular roofing system features Moisture Portal technology and hidden tray lips that connect the roots of each vegetation unit for even water and nutrient distribution across the entire system. In times of excess precipitation, drain channels disperse water at seven gallons per minute for each linear foot. LiveRoof features mature grasses and perennials for a monolithic appearance, but with modular benefits for maintenance and ease of installation. It comes with a 20-year module warranty. Easiwall TreeBox TreeBox’s vertical green cladding panel is made from recycled poly-propylene with a waterproof barrier along a solid back panel. Measuring just under 11 feet squared, each panel weighs 34 pounds empty and can support 150 pounds—including a saturated substrate—when attached to a vertical surface via galvanized steel support rails. Easiwall absorbs 35 to 40 percent of soil volume in moisture. Its modular design is scalable to most building dimensions. Silva Cell DeepRoot The Silva Cell modular containment system transfers above-grade loads to a compacted sub-base. Increased root space serves as an on-site storm water management system and can hold up to 2 inches of storm water. Each 48-by-24-by-16-inch frame features approximately 92 percent void space for ample soil distribution and can accommodate under-ground utilities. Recently specified to support 33 Maples at Toronto’s Sugar Beach, landscape architect Marc Hallé reported that the trees “look they are on steroids. EcoPriora Unilock Multiple shapes and colors are available in Unilock’s new permeable pavers thanks to the introduction of new face mix technology. The rectangular and square pavers—large and small—feature tight joint tolerances compliant with ADA regulation. The pavers also support rapid storm water infiltration and they are strong enough to support commercial vehicular traffic. Enka Retain & Drain Bonar Enka Retain & Drain combines effective green roof drainage while promoting root health by retaining requisite moisture. Water retention material is constructed from 100 percent post-industrial recycled non-woven polypropylene that is designed to hold 15 times its weight in water and conforms to irregular surfaces and offsets. The drainage core is made up of 40 percent post-industrial recycled polypropylene filaments entangled in a square waffle pattern that creates an open flow path for water. Rainstore3 Invisible Structures Constructed from injection-molded plastic, Rainstore panels are suitable for stormwater storage and retention systems in driving areas and parking lots. Thirty-six vertical columns in each 40-by-40-by-4-inch unit store up to a total of 25 gallons of water, and can be stacked up to 24 high, accommodating more storage than chambers and pipes over a smaller surface area. Its open design also supports exfiltration of stormwater along the bottom and sides of the chamber. EPDM Geomembrane Firestone Building Products Suitable for critical containment jobs or decorative water features, EPDM Geomembrane is a flexible, easily installable water barrier for constructed wetlands, agricultural ponds, reservoirs, and landscape features. A variety of panel sizes can be specified and, with 300 percent elongation potential, the product can conform to irregular shapes and contours. It is compatible with Firestone’s QuickSeam Tape for seamless connections. It is also safe for fish and wildlife. HOG RainwaterHOG This 50-gallon storage tank can be connected vertically or horizontally to other HOGs for increased storage capacity. Constructed from a ¼-inch thick, food-grade plastic resin, the HOG can contain potable water as easily as irrigation or emergency stores. The cistern’s outlet is located on the floor of the tank rather than the side for easier access. Designed in Australia for warmer climates, it can withstand temperatures between 22 degrees and 140 degrees Fahrenheit, thanks to a UV8 stabilizer mixed into the resin.
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SOM’s University Center at The New School Gets Its Green Roof

A dramatic 16-story building designed by SOM has continued construction on the corner of Fifth Avenue and 14th Street in Manhattan. The structure will eventually open at the University Center for The New School, and with its Muntz metal (a type of brass made of copper and zinc) and glass facade now in place, most of the activity is happening behind closed doors. Or in this case, on the roof only viewable from neighboring buildings. In late July, crews installed a thin emerald necklace where the building sets back including what appears to be a variety of sedum plants commonly found on green roofs. The building is expected to be complete this fall. In the meantime, read about SOM's unique approach to expressing circulation on the facade in an AN In Detail report.
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Unveiled> Bjarke Ingels Designs an Entire City Covered in Green Roofs Near Paris

The Bjarke Ingels Group, along with Tess, Transsolar, Base, Transitec, and Michel Forgue, have revealed their winning design for EuropaCity, a 200-acre urban cultural and commercial destination located between Paris and Roissy. Combining the forms of a dense European city with an open landscape, EuropaCity is set to be a retail, cultural, and leisure city of unprecedented scale. Modeled on the European urban experience and equipped with cutting edge green technologies, the development will serve as a retail and cultural hub for the region as well as a laboratory and showcase for sustainable design. The project will contain concert halls, spas, and retail oriented around an internal avenue and based on traditional European urban models, with integrated infrastructures for bicycles and electric-powered public transit. The entire project will be caped in a massive landscaped green roof, containing, of course, ski slopes, hiking trails, urban farming, rolling hills, sloping valleys, and unmatched views of the Paris skyline. The mega-development will be linked directly to the Paris Metro and the Charles de Gaul Airport. “EuropaCity will be an experimental hybrid between urbanism and landscape design,” said Bjark Ingels in a statement. “Center and periphery overlapped in simultaneous coexistence of a recreational open landscape of rolling hills superimposed on an urban neighborhood of walkable streets, plazas, and parks.” While EuropaCity will be fully powered through solar, biofuels, and geothermal, BIG hopes to reach for another level of sustainability with the project by crafting a high quality of public life within the area and providing solutions by which we can improve the quality of the urban environment.
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Southern Philadelphia High School Crowdsourcing Philly’s First Rooftop Farm

[beforeafter]philly_roof_garden_02 philly_roof_garden_01[/beforeafter] Southern Philadelphia High School has teamed up with Roofmeadow, a Philly-based green roof design and engineering firm, and the Lower Moyamensing Civic Association to bring the city its first rooftop farm in a new campus-wide plan to take the school from gray to green. The plan includes rain gardens, street trees, vegetable gardens, and a rooftop farm. These elements will be incorporated into a new curriculum for the school’s culinary and science departments, providing students with a chance to escape the classroom and engage in hands-on learning, while nearby residents will gain access to fresh produce and new green space. “South Philly High is on the cutting edge of sustainability and innovation,” said Kim Massare, President of the Lower Moyamensing Civic Association in a statement to greenroofs.com. “It is changing the way we think about what a school should be and using technology to drive change in a totally new direction.” The school is working with Roofmeadow and community representatives to develop the master plan, which targets large, underutilized properties on the school’s urban campus. The project will be crowdfunded through Projexity, an online platform that provides the support and framework for bottom-up neighborhood development projects, from creating proposals, to gathering funding, holding design competitions and getting the final approval necessary to move forward. The first of five stages of fundraising begins here on April 9th.
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Urban Farming Duo Plants Seeds for Boston’s First Rooftop Farm

While rooftop farming has cropped up in a number of cities across the country, it has yet to take root in Boston. But this will soon change when founders Courtney Hennessey and John Stoddard launch operations of their new rooftop farm, aptly called Higher Ground Farm, located atop the Boston Design Center this Spring. According to CoLab Radio at MIT, the duo will start planting on a 40,000-square-feet segment of the expansive 55,000-square-feet roof within the next few months and be ready to sell the fresh produce by summer. The farm is coming at just the right time—the city is making a real push to encourage more urban farming. The Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA) has introduced Article 89, an urban agriculture zoning initiative that will “establish an environment in which all of our citizens—particularly the most underserved—have direct access to locally produced fresh food, the ability to produce food for themselves, and access to education and knowledge about healthy eating.” Hennessey and Stoddard have made a dent in their fundraising efforts through kickstarter and fundraisers, but still need more money to get the farm completely off the ground. They hope to secure more capital to reach their $300,000 goal with the help of loans and grants.
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Product> Let It Pour: Eight of the Leading Green Roof & Subsurface Components

Nothing says "sustainable architecture quite like a green roof. AN has rounded up eight of the latest green roof and subsurface components that the pros use to seal out, drain, or retail water, like the Green Roof Blocks system (above) by Green Roof Blocks. The Green Roof Block system is a completely self-contained module made from high-grade anodized aluminum. It can be pre-planted with a growth medium that the company guarantees will never break down. Built-in drainage and convenient handles make the units easy to install. Extensive Green Roof System Green Roof Solutions This four-inch extensive green roof system can absorb 60 percent to 90 percent of a one-inch storm event and can delay runoff of over 6,200 gallons on a 10,000-square-foot roof. Green Roof Solutions also offers electronic leak testing to ensure that your roof is airtight before you begin planting. Extensive MC Rooflite This extensive green roof growing medium features a precisely balanced blend of lightweight mineral aggregates and organic components, such as USCC STA-approved compost. Used at Brooklyn Grange and the new Barclays Center, it works in very shallow systems and can drain and retain water simultaneously. Super Pervious Pavers Xeripave With a flow-through rate that exceeds 5,000 inches per hour, Xeripave’s line of super-pervious pavers is suitable for both residential and commercial projects. Storm water is captured and transported to the underlying base of rock where the volume of water is stored, allowing for slower infiltration into the soil below. G476 Waterproofing Membrane Sika Sarnafil Sika Sarnafil's bright orange flagship product is made from specially formulated fiberglass-reinforced thermoplastic that is highly puncture-proof and remains watertight in even the harshest buried environments, resisting high alkalinity, fungi, and bacteria. It also comes in a self-adhesive, foam-backed version. Bio-Module Green Innovations This pre-vegetated modular, interlocking green roof system features integrated irrigation, filter fabric, drainage, and water retention. It also comes in a variety of plantings. At 70 liters per square meter, the Shortgrass Meadow option can handle as many as 100 rainy events per year. Draincore2 Invisible Structures These high-volume geocomposite drainage and conveyance layers can be configured for site-specific flow volumes for advanced subsurface and green roof applications. The drainage core is wrapped in a geotextile fabric that allows water in from any direction and can distribute 42 gallons of water per minute per foot width. Drainage Board Foam Sedum Master Made from 100 percent recycled cross-link, closed cell polyethylene foam with no foreign additives, this mold-resistant, specially blended Drainage Board Foam is bonded with PET filter fabrics and acts as a drainage layer, insulation, and water retention system all in one.
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A decade of green growth celebrated at CitiesAlive!

It's hard to believe that it’s been 10 years since the first green roof gathering in Chicago, when 400 green roof enthusiasts came together from around the world to share their passion and knowledge of green roofs.  Since then, we've laid some very important foundations for the industry, which enjoyed an amazing 115% growth rate last year. On October 17-20 at CitiesAlive, we will gather at the Congress Plaza Hotel in Chicago once more, to celebrate all that we have accomplished together, and lay plans for the future growth of this industry.  Performance is the unifying theme for programming that features the best and brightest in green roof and wall design, research, policy.  'On the roof with' conversations feature examples of what green infrastructure is best at - stormwater management, urban agriculture, increasing biodiversity, energy efficiency, job creation and more.  Together, we're building a legacy of outstanding performance! CitiesAlive includes a trade show where 70+ companies announce the leading products and services in the sector.  There is training for Green Roof Professionals, continuing education credits for AIA CES, LA CES, GBCI, RCI and APLD!  Tours, receptions, the Awards of Excellence all play a role in CitiesAlive - and this year also marks the launch of the commemorative issue of the gorgeous new coffee table book "The Rise of Living Architecture" featuring 50 of green roof movers and shakers, many of whom will be on hand for a huge autograph session! Come and join this landmark 10th Anniversary CitiesAlive celebration – visit www.citiesalive.org to register today. Submitted by: Steven W Peck, President & Founder of Green Roofs for Healthy Cities (greenroofs.org)

Bjarke Ingels Begins 2012 with an AIA Honor Award

After roaring into New York last year, BIG is reaping rewards from the American Institute of Architects who bestowed an Honor Award on the firm's aptly-named "8 House" in Copenhagen (it looks like a figure-8 in plan). The AIA jury lavished praise: "people really 'live' in this newly created neighborhood," which "provides an invigorating sculptural form while creating the ramped 'pedestrian' street system." Ramps around 8 House make it bikable—from the street up to its 10th level penthouses—and two sloping green roofs total over 18,000 SF where the building reaches down to the ground.
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Quick Clicks> City Atlas, Boathouse Retouch, Urban After Dark, Seasonal Seoul

The City Atlas. The City Atlas is a new online project that seeks to create a platform to share collective imagination that is grounded on past and current accomplishments yet aimed at the future. Check out their website here. Don't Remove, Retouch. This beautifully renovated Norweigian boathouse is still technically un-new. Norwegian architects TYIN tegnestue was committed to reuse as much physical material as possible during the renovation. Images at WorldArchitectureNews. Urban After Dark. According to Chuck Wolfe at myurbanist, a city's true success is best measured at night (hence the quote “cities, like cats, will reveal themselves at night"). Seasonal Sedum. Check out these twelve staggered living roofs in Seoul designed by Joel Sanders Architect in cooperation with Haeahn Architecture. The roofs are planted with flowers (sedum) that bloom at different times of the year-- resulting in changing, seasonal landscapes. See the images on Inhabitat.
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P!LA: SynthE-sizing Dinner

On Saturday, before we headed over to the Standard for my star turn on the media panel, Sam Lubell and I first swung by the Flat, home to celebrated LA restaurant Blue Velvet. We were there for an event hosted by colleague and co-panelist Alyssa Walker, part of her de Lab (design east of LaBrea) series. SCI-arc professor and hunk Alexis Rochas had installed easily the coolest green roof we've ever seen on top of the condo, and two dozen or so people had shown up for a tour, followed by a most-interesting lunch. The Flat, you see, is an old Holiday Inn motor hotel on the border of Westlake and downtown that was converted three years ago into luxury apartments. (I guess this is what passes for historic preservation in LA.) Well, shortly after the residences and attached restaurant opened, the folks at Blue Velvet asked Rochas to design a green roof for them, not only to retain stormwater runoff but also to supply the most local produce imaginable, at least for Downtown LA. With a group of his students, Rochas devised SynthE. The team took about 950 laser-cut panels, no two alike, bent them into the desired forms, welded them all together, and created what looks like Logan's Run if it were set on the Inner Mongolian steppe. Rochas explained that the form serves two purposes, directing the flow of water into the planted bands as well as subtly outlining the mechanical systems hidden beneath. Because the building was built before the 1967 code took effect, the weight tolerances of the roof were incredibly thin, and only 20 pounds per square foot could be added. This necessitated not only the use of the lightweight aluminum, but also a special soil, which only weighs, with water, around 15 pounds per square foot. Still, Rochas said the system absorbed 80 percent to 90 percent of all precipitation and had no trouble sustaining the plants that are product, or rather produce, of the roof. "As an architect, you design the structure and its shape, but also this time, its program and its use," Rochas explained. "The architect becomes a gardener, the gardener a planner." Indeed, the entire roof, but for a patch of grass intended for lounging by residents, is planted with various fruits, vegetables, and other edibles for Blue Velvet. Working 90-day crop cycles, the team grows all manner of tomatoes, herbs, greens, berries, wheat grass, even some monster cabbage. "It's a true, organic experiment, seeing what will grow and succeed," Rochas said. "And you can't get more local." Plus, it makes a decent slide.
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Who Designed These Buildings?

On Friday, the prolific New York Times metro reporter Jennifer 8. Lee, whose beat seems to include everything from fortune cookies to urban planning, covered a new mixed supportive and moderate-income housing development in Harlem, co-developed by the Fortune Society. Unfortunately for the architects involved, she misattributed the design of the project, and of another recent affordable housing development in Harlem, David and Joyce Dinkins Gardens, to the other co-developer, Jonathan Rose Companies.
courtesy Curtis + Ginsberg Architects
Designed by Curtis + Ginsberg Architects, the 114-unit, 110,000 square foot Fortune Society project includes housing for former inmates as well as moderate-income apartments. The eleven story building, which is designed to meet LEED Gold Standards, features a terraced green roof system, a portion of which is accessible, rainwater harvesting, sustainable buildings materials, and sun louvers over the windows, among other green design elements. “It has wonderful views of the Hudson,” said Roberta Darby Curtis, principal at Curtis + Ginsberg. “For people who have been incarcerated, having access to the outdoors is that much more important,” Mark Ginsberg, the other principal, told AN.
courtesy Dattner Architects
Dinkins Gardens, completed last year, was designed by Dattner Architects, and was also co-developed by Rose. It also includes affordable housing and is topped with green roof. Though the mistake was surely unintentional, the developers, and the architects, behind these projects deserve credit for these cost effective, environmentally and socially responsive projects.