Posts tagged with "green roofs":

CitiesAlive 2018

What is the future of our city regions? Will they be unbearably hot and regularly flooded by intense rains and high tides?  Will they be increasingly unhealthy and more divided between 'us and them'? Will there be a lack of green space and job opportunities? CitiesAlive provides green infrastructure solutions to urban challenges by bringing together designers, researchers, contractors, manufacturers, and policymakers. Discover how to shape a healthier, more resilient future in NYC this September. CitiesAlive 2018  will explore topics like flood management, biodiversity, biophilic design, urban agriculture, vertical forests, coastal greening, green finance, new performance metrics, advancements in green infrastructure policy and regulations and new research findings from over 80 expert speakers. The Architect's Newspaper's network receives 10% off Basic Delegate Passes by using the code ‘archnews10’ during registrations for CitiesAlive 2018. For more information and to register please visit citiesalive.org.

Green Roof Professional Training Course – New York City

Green Roof Professional 3 - day Training course (taken together, or a la carte) February 28th - March 2nd , 2018 8:30 am - 5:00 pm
Green Roof Design and Installation Wednesday, February 28th 2018 Green Roof Design and Installation provides the latest information on green roof benefits, technical standards, product innovations, and design and installation best practices. It presents tools and techniques needed to meet green roof project objectives on schedule, to specification, and within budget.
Location: TBD
Green Roof Waterproofing and Drainage Thursday, March 1st 2018 This course will provide participants with an overview of waterproofing and drainage construction and maintenance for green roof assemblies. It lays out technical vocabulary and materials and presents detailed design solutions and implementation best management practices for waterproofing and drainage in green roofs.
Location: TBD
Green Roof Plants and Growing Media Friday, March 2nd 2018 This course will provide participants with an overview of plants and growing media design considerations and maintenance for green roof assemblies. It establishes design and implementation best management practices for plants and growing media in green roofs.
Interagency Council (AIC)
150 West 30th Street, 15th Floor
New York, NY 10001
Space is limited. Reserve your seat now.
Tuition: Green Roof Design and Installation - $499 before January 28th, $524 starting January 29th. Green Roof Waterproofing and Drainage - $399 before January 28th, $424 starting January 29th. Green Roof Plants and Growing Media - $399 before January 28th, $424 starting January 29th. GRHC members receive an additional $25 discount on each course. If paying by check, please note it must be received in our office no later than one week before the event. Registrations may be canceled by a participant up to THREE DAYS prior to the event, and will incur a $50 cancellation fee per course. We regret that we cannot cancel a registration after that point.
Continuing Education Credits: Green Roofs for Healthy Cities is an approved continuing education provider with USGBC/GBCI, AIA CES, LA CES, APLD, BOMI and RCI. Earn up to 7.5 Continuing Education (Professional Development) Hours per course.

Green Roof Professional Training Course – New York City

Green Roof Professional 3 - day Training course (taken together, or a la carte) February 28th - March 2nd , 2018 8:30 am - 5:00 pm
Green Roof Design and Installation Wednesday, February 28th 2018 Green Roof Design and Installation provides the latest information on green roof benefits, technical standards, product innovations, and design and installation best practices. It presents tools and techniques needed to meet green roof project objectives on schedule, to specification, and within budget.
Location: TBD
Green Roof Waterproofing and Drainage Thursday, March 1st 2018 This course will provide participants with an overview of waterproofing and drainage construction and maintenance for green roof assemblies. It lays out technical vocabulary and materials and presents detailed design solutions and implementation best management practices for waterproofing and drainage in green roofs.
Location: TBD
Green Roof Plants and Growing Media Friday, March 2nd 2018 This course will provide participants with an overview of plants and growing media design considerations and maintenance for green roof assemblies. It establishes design and implementation best management practices for plants and growing media in green roofs.
Interagency Council (AIC)
150 West 30th Street, 15th Floor
New York, NY 10001
Space is limited. Reserve your seat now.
Tuition: Green Roof Design and Installation - $499 before January 28th, $524 starting January 29th. Green Roof Waterproofing and Drainage - $399 before January 28th, $424 starting January 29th. Green Roof Plants and Growing Media - $399 before January 28th, $424 starting January 29th. GRHC members receive an additional $25 discount on each course. If paying by check, please note it must be received in our office no later than one week before the event. Registrations may be canceled by a participant up to THREE DAYS prior to the event, and will incur a $50 cancellation fee per course. We regret that we cannot cancel a registration after that point.
Continuing Education Credits: Green Roofs for Healthy Cities is an approved continuing education provider with USGBC/GBCI, AIA CES, LA CES, APLD, BOMI and RCI. Earn up to 7.5 Continuing Education (Professional Development) Hours per course.

Green Roof Professional Training Course – New York City

Green Roof Professional 3 - day Training course (taken together, or a la carte) February 28th - March 2nd , 2018 8:30 am - 5:00 pm
Green Roof Design and Installation Wednesday, February 28th 2018 Green Roof Design and Installation provides the latest information on green roof benefits, technical standards, product innovations, and design and installation best practices. It presents tools and techniques needed to meet green roof project objectives on schedule, to specification, and within budget.
Location: TBD
Green Roof Waterproofing and Drainage Thursday, March 1st 2018 This course will provide participants with an overview of waterproofing and drainage construction and maintenance for green roof assemblies. It lays out technical vocabulary and materials and presents detailed design solutions and implementation best management practices for waterproofing and drainage in green roofs.
Location: TBD
Green Roof Plants and Growing Media Friday, March 2nd 2018 This course will provide participants with an overview of plants and growing media design considerations and maintenance for green roof assemblies. It establishes design and implementation best management practices for plants and growing media in green roofs.
Interagency Council (AIC)
150 West 30th Street, 15th Floor
New York, NY 10001
Space is limited. Reserve your seat now.
Tuition: Green Roof Design and Installation - $499 before January 28th, $524 starting January 29th. Green Roof Waterproofing and Drainage - $399 before January 28th, $424 starting January 29th. Green Roof Plants and Growing Media - $399 before January 28th, $424 starting January 29th. GRHC members receive an additional $25 discount on each course. If paying by check, please note it must be received in our office no later than one week before the event. Registrations may be canceled by a participant up to THREE DAYS prior to the event, and will incur a $50 cancellation fee per course. We regret that we cannot cancel a registration after that point.
Continuing Education Credits: Green Roofs for Healthy Cities is an approved continuing education provider with USGBC/GBCI, AIA CES, LA CES, APLD, BOMI and RCI. Earn up to 7.5 Continuing Education (Professional Development) Hours per course.
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Archtober Building of the Day 4> Queens Botanical Garden Visitor and Administration Building

It makes sense that one of New York City's exceptional botanical gardens would develop what would become one of the city's first green buildings. What is extraordinary is that the Queens Botanical Garden (QBG) began its new Visitor and Administration Building in 2000 – the year LEED certification was launched – and achieved LEED Platinum for a building that ambitiously demonstrates what designed harmony between buildings and nature can be. Patrice Kleinberg, garden educator for the QBG, and Joan Krevlin, FAIA, LEED AP BD+C, partner at BKSK Architects, led today’s tour, providing perspectives on both the garden’s unique public engagement challenges and the design solutions. At the earliest stages of the project, the QBG engaged the community to find out what would serve them; across all sectors, they heard “water.” What subsequently evolved was a series of water systems that were both experiential and functional – the building houses not only administrative operations and diverse public programming, but also collects, conserves, cleans, and recycles water. Three different sustainable roofs serve different purposes. The main structure hosts a solar-powered roof, which generates enough power for about 20% of the building’s operations. The roof of the auditorium is planted with local species, cooling the building. The forecourt’s soaring roof canopy, which provides a shady transition space between the gardens and the interior, doubles as a rainwater collection unit. The water collected by the canopy is stored in a subterranean 26,000-gallon cistern that is pumped up into the Fountain of Life, which leads to a leafy stream and eventually into a moving body of water that is terraced between the buildings and culminates in a moat-like pond. The Visitor and Administration Building also sustains a grey water system, wherein water from sinks, toilets, dishwashers, and showers moves through a sandy, planted biotope, from which it can be repurposed. These innovations have inspired and expanded the QBG’s educational offerings, engendering green cleaning job training, and leading to the development of new K-12 curricula. Importantly, the project's bioswales have greatly decreased storm run-off in the area’s sewage systems. Tomorrow, we’ll head over to the World Trade Center Transportation Hub.
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French law mandates green roofs or solar panels on all new buildings in commercial zones

It’s serious crunch time in France for environmental policymaking as regulations tighten in deference to the 2020 goal of reducing carbon emissions by 25 percent. Paris is also scrambling for brownie points as it prepares to host the UN Conference on Climate Change this November. Lawmakers in France recently decreed that all rooftops of new commercial buildings must be covered in either plants or solar panels. Other major cities have gone to similarly stringent lengths, with the city of Toronto, Canada, mandating green roofs on all new buildings in 2009—whether residential, industrial or commercial. Expected foliage cover ranges from 20 to 60 percent depending on the size and type of building, with residential dwellings less than six stories high exempt from the mandate. Green roofs are an apt counterweight to the urban island phenomenon, in which urban zones are found to be several degrees hotter than surrounding rural areas because of their concrete density relative to moist, permeable land and vegetation. On the other hand, green roofs create an “isolating effect” that cools the building, reducing energy needs for heating and cooling in winter and summer, and retain rainwater to reduce excess runoff and flood likelihood. A green roof also bodes $200,000 in savings over its lifetime, according to researchers at Michigan State University. French environmental activists had initially lobbied for far less leniency, calling for every roof on every new building to be entirely covered by plants, without the option of installing solar panels instead. The Socialist government sought a middle-ground appeasement, convincing activists to limit the law to commercial buildings. France still lags behind other European countries in terms of solar deployment, installing just 613 megawatts of solar photovoltaics in 2013, falling behind countries that had installed at least 1 gigawatt in previous years, according to a 2014 report by the European Photovoltaic Industry Association.
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AN Video> Take an exclusive tour of the Barclays Center’s under-construction green roof

barclay-graphic-02 It is not surprising that the Barclays Center has been a polarizing building. It was born out of one of New York’s most controversial development schemes, it draws big crowds to the heart of Brownstone Brooklyn, and, of course, has a bold architectural form and facade that people tend to really love or really hate. https://vimeo.com/128175007 But no matter what you may think of the SHoP Architects–designed arena, it hasn’t seemed quite finished since Jay Z inaugurated the building with eight sold out shows back in 2012. Because above the arena’s rippling steel skin was a bare white roof (save for the Barclays logo) that looked, more or less, like a bald spot. Now, that’s changing as the Barclays Center’s long-promised green roof is taking shape. While the 135,000-square-foot space will not be publicly accessible, it is designed to reduce noise output from the arena, capture rainwater, and provide nice views from the street, as well as from the new towers rising above it. The undisclosed cost of the project is being covered by a joint venture between Forest City Ratner and the Shanghai-based Greenland Holding Group, which has joined the Pacific Park Brooklyn project, formerly known as Atlantic Yards. The Architect’s Newspaper was recently granted exclusive access onto the Barclays Center’s roof to see the installation process. See for yourself in our video above.
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Deborah Berke unveils a green-roofed tower and park for Cummins Indianapolis

The redevelopment of Indianapolis' Market Square area continues with the announcement that Deborah Berke Partners of New York City will work with locally based RATIO Architects on a 10-story office tower and “significant public green space” to replace a surface parking lot. In renderings released Wednesday, a slim, glassy tower hefts the bulk of its block-wide breadth southward, collecting sunlight as it reaches a low-rise mass around lush green space bordered by Market, Alabama, Washington, and New Jersey streets. Green roofs blanket both buildings, which will each have about 15,000 square feet of first-floor retail fronting onto a pedestrian plaza. The programs include a parking garage and conference center, as well as office space and retail. Columbus, Indiana–based Cummins makes and services natural gas engines and other fuel systems, employing about 48,000 people worldwide. About 250 workers, including top executives, will move into the building immediately, reported the Indianapolis Star, assuming the plan passes a City-County Council vote that could come as early as December 17. Mayor Greg Ballard has already voiced support for the project, which he said in a statement “raises the bar for architecture in Indy and will stand as a bold and visually compelling gateway into the city.” The building's form, a kinked rectangular prism, is slightly stepped and shifted to maximize natural light inside the office tower. Black, rib-like mullions vary the facade's texture when viewed from an angle. Local architect Wil Marquez told the Star it represents "a new type of architecture for Indianapolis." “This is the new vocabulary in architecture, tying together buildings and green space,” Marquez said. Along with a 28-story residential tower planned across the street, a rebuilt plaza space nearby and a sleek, new $20 million transit center by the City-County Building, Cummins' plans represent somewhat of a rebirth for this long neglected corner of downtown Indianapolis. Deborah Berke Partners beat out New York colleagues SHoP Architects and Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects for the job.
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Product> Liquid Assets: Best Water Management Tools

Water has been called the oil of the 21st century. Whether too much (Exhibit A: Hurricane Sandy) or too little (Exhibit B: California, Texas, and the Southwest), conserving, cleaning, and controlling it has never been a higher priority for architects and their clients. From rooftops to underground, these innovative systems and products work to make the most of every drop.  Eco-Optiloc Unilock The L-shape format of this permeable paver ensures a superior lock-up that can withstand the pressure of the heaviest commercial loads. Small voids between units provide drainage into a sub-base. Custom colors available. StormTank Brentwood Industries An economic alternative to crushed stone or pipe chamber systems, this flexible system can be deployed for infiltration, detention, reuse, and pretreatment purposes. Cudo Water Storage System Oldcastle Stormwater Solutions Boasting 95 percent capacity, these snap-together components can be assembled to accommodate various configurations of pipelines and flow channels. Grasscrete, Molded-Pulp Former Bowmanite For constructing on-grade areas of pervious surfaces, these single-use forms are made of 100 percent recycled paper and are biodegradable. GeoPave Presto Geosystems A herringbone grid of recycled, high-density polyethylene cells with mesh bottoms provides stability for aggregate surfaces while acting as a natural, on-site stormwater management system. SkyScape Vegetated Roof System Firestone Building Products This pre-grown vegetated roof system integrates filter fabric, drainage panels, and geotextile into a single, labor-saving roll. Sedum mats use regional-specific cultivars. Rainwater Hog HOG Works Slim and modular, these rainwater collection tanks can be installed vertically or horizontally. Fabricated of food-grade polyethylene, the 50-gallon containers are UV-stabilized and impervious to light. Rainstore3 Invisible Structures A modular, stackable structure used to store stormwater underground, it exceeds H-20 loading standards, allowing construction of driving areas and parking lots above the system.
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HGA Updates a Minneapolis Landmark

Slate-clad addition to the American Swedish Institute evokes contemporary Scandinavian design.

Minneapolis-based architecture, engineering, and planning firm HGA faced a tall order when the American Swedish Institute asked them to design an addition to the building known locally as "The Castle." The turreted Turnblad Mansion, constructed in Minneapolis' Phillips West neighborhood in 1908 and home of ASI since 1929, lacked the kinds of multi-purpose spaces required by ASI's cultural and educational programming—and was suffering wear and tear from a steady stream of visitors. "The project was about creating a front door that was more welcoming and inviting than the existing building, that can help protect the mansion and allow it to be used as a house museum," said project architect Andy Weyenberg. At the same time,  "the mansion remained the focal point," he explained. "It will always be the identity of ASI. Everything we did, we wanted to respect the mansion and keep it as a centerpiece." HGA's intervention honors the primacy of the Turnblad Mansion while updating ASI's image with a contemporary facade inspired by Swedish building methods and materials.
  • Facade Manufacturer Vermont Slate Company (slate), Architectural Glass Art (art glass), Empirehouse (curtain walls)
  • Architects HGA Architects and Engineers
  • Facade Installer Dalco (slate), Empirehouse (curtain wall and glazing)
  • Facade Consultant Xcel Energy (daylighting analysis)
  • Location Minneapolis, MN
  • Date of Completion 2012
  • System slate shingles, art glass panels, curtain walls, glazing, green roof
  • Products Vermont Slate shingles, custom art glass from Architectural Glass Art, Empirehouse custom curtain walls Viracon glazing
"The mansion doesn't relate well to the Swedish identity: it's a French Chateau," said Weyenberg. "ASI wanted to use the addition to reinforce their identity as a Swedish institution, but they were interested in doing that in a modern way, relating it more to modern Swedish design and architecture." Positioned across a courtyard, or gård (a traditional typology found in both rural and urban buildings), from the Turnblad Mansion, the new Nelson Cultural Center is clad primarily in slate shingles. "Slate is a common building material in Scandinavia, especially dark slate like that," explained Weyenberg, who says that it is primarily used as a roofing material, but that he has seen examples of slate cladding since working on ASI's expansion. The slate also matches that on the Turnblad Mansion's roof. "We're using material that's sympathetic to the mansion, but using it in a different way. It's clearly a new piece of architecture," said Weyenberg. He points out that although there's nothing particularly high-tech about how the cladding was installed—it is hung like a roof system—it promises environmental benefits in terms of durability and longevity. "The roof on the mansion has been in place 100 years," observed Weyenberg. The entrance to Nelson Cultural Center is lined with panes of blue textured glass, another nod to Swedish design. Sweden is known for its glassmaking, having produced art glass firms including Orrefors and Kosta Boda. ASI's collection also includes a number of significant glass pieces. "That was another way of tying the design back to Sweden, and creating a reference to the ASI's collection, while also creating a bold element at the entry," said Weyenberg. HGA worked with Louisville, Kentucky, glassmakers Architectural Glass Art (AGA) to combine layers of commercially available textured glass and resin to create the translucent panels. "There's not a strong reference in terms of its construction to Swedish glassmaking," said Weyenberg, "but there was a process in terms of working with AGA as a craftsman to come to a quality we all liked. We wanted something subtle in texture but with an organic quality that relates well to the slate." HGA took advantage of a consulting program sponsored by local energy provider Xcel Energy to locate windows and curtain walls to frame views of the mansion and maximize daylighting while minimizing energy loss. Other features contributing to Nelson Cultural Center's LEED Gold status include a vegetated roof over the gallery and event spaces. "Green roofs are a really common form of building in Sweden," said Weyenberg. "They've been building sod roofs on farm buildings forever." Nelson Cultural Center's contemporary design reflects ASI's commitment to celebrating the Swedish influence on the Twin Cities while connecting with Minneapolis' next generation of newcomers—including, in the Phillips West neighborhood, young Somali immigrants. "As part of this expansion, they were really trying to update their identity and keep themselves current," said Weyenberg. "Their core constituency is aging. They were looking for a way to keep themselves relevant, and to reach out to new audiences."
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Alexander Gorlin Wraps Supportive Housing in a Binary Skin

An aluminum rain screen and locally-sourced brick articulate a two-part program.

The Brook, developed by Common Ground and designed by Alexander Gorlin Architects, is part of a new wave of affordable housing communities popping up all over the United States. Unlike the public housing projects of the mid-twentieth century, which focused exclusively on housing and tended to suffer from a lack of routine maintenance, The Brook, located in the Bronx, combines apartments and support services under one roof. This duality is manifested in the envelope’s contrasting material palette—dark grey brick for the residential spaces, raw aluminum over the community facilities. “The idea of the exterior was to symbolize, as well as reflect, the internal program of Common Ground as supportive housing,” said Alexander Gorlin. “It’s inspired in part by Le Corbusier and his idea of expressing the program on the facade, and expressing the public functions as a means of interrupting a repetitive facade." The Brook’s communal areas, which are clustered at the corner of the 92,000-square-foot, six-story building, are marked on the exterior by ES Tolga Dry Seal System aluminum panels from Allied Metal. In addition to articulating the change in program, the metal facade “represents coming together, creating a landmark for the neighborhood as well,” said Gorlin, who noted that Common Ground “liked from the beginning marking the corner as a special symbolic place.” The metal-clad corner also functions “urbanistically, to break the building into three parts, break down its scale,” he explained. A series of inset terraces interrupt the grey aluminum walls with splashes of red. “At one level it’s a bright color to be cheerful and optimistic,” said Gorlin. “In China, red is a symbol of good luck. It also symbolizes the heart of the program and the community.”
  • Facade Manufacturer Allied Metal
  • Architects Alexander Gorlin Architects
  • Facade Consultant Justin Henshell
  • Facade Installer Mountco Construction
  • Location Bronx, NY
  • Date of Completion 2011
  • System prefabricated aluminum rain screen
  • Products ES Tolga Dry Seal System aluminum rain screen, locally-sourced brick
The Brook’s 190 studio apartments are distributed to either side of the community facilities, along wings punctuated with square and rectangular windows. “We decided to vary the window placement so it would create a more lively asymmetrical pattern. It’s not just a simple grid,” said Gorlin. The designers clad the housing areas in locally sourced dark grey brick. “Brick is a very noble, ancient material,” observed Gorlin. As a good insulator, it also contributes to the building’s LEED Silver status. Other sustainability strategies include a green roof, a special boiler system, building management technology that turns off the lights when a room is not in use, and the use of recycled and non-offgassing materials. The Brook was erected on a vacant lot in a neighborhood once known for pervasive blight. Early in the design process, said Gorlin, the architects and developers discussed installing bars over the lower windows. “It was determined very consciously not to do it, even though there’s glass on the corner,” he explained. “We decided not to put bars up or make it look in any way prison-like. In fact, by not doing so it’s been maintained in perfect shape. People in the neighborhood think it’s a high-end condo.” Gorlin calls Common Ground “a miraculous kind of client in terms of what they do and the manner in which they deal with the community.” The Brook, he said, represents a new approach not just to affordable housing, but to homelessness. “To actually build permanent housing for homeless people” is a unique opportunity, he said. “It’s not just a shelter, but a place to start over in life.”
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Barclays Center’s Bald Spot to Get Green-Roof Toupee

Over one-hundred-thousand-square-feet of sedum will be implanted into the Barclays Center’s massive, logo-emblazoned, bald-spot of a roof. According to the Wall Street Journal, SHoP is designing the green topper for the one billion dollar arena. Plans for a public green space on top of the arena date back over a decade, but were later scrapped due to cost constraints. But, now, Atlantic Yards developer Forest City Ratner has revived the plan—sort of. The green roof won’t so much be a public space, as it will be a marketing tool. Ratner representatives told the Journal that the new roof will help entice prospective tenants into the apartments rising around the center. Turns out, a green roof provides a better view than a Barclays logo. They also claim that the green roof will cut down on noise from concerts, which have been much louder than the developer expected.