Posts tagged with "Glass":

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ZGF Builds a Suit of Armor for The University of Oregon

The glass, stone, and metal exterior of the Hatfield-Dowlin Complex evokes the strength and agility of a college athlete.

The superhero and the Samurai. That’s where Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Architects (ZGF) began their design of the Hatfield-Dowlin Complex at the University of Oregon. The football player, the architects imagined, is like Batman: stealthy and strong, he came to his powers not by supernatural accident, but through relentless training. At the same time, the athlete is a highly skilled warrior, the modern-day equivalent of Japanese military nobility. The facade of the new football training facility materializes these ideas in glass, stone, and metal. Dominated by horizontal expanses of tinted glass, it is powerful but not foreboding. ZGF offers the analogy to a suit of armor: the building’s skin balances protection and connection, solidity and agility. The most direct expression of the armor metaphor is on the Hatfield-Dowlin Complex’s west exterior. In Eugene, the real solar challenge comes not from the south, but from the west, where the sun hovers near the horizon for long periods all winter long. To minimize glare, the designers placed a floating sunscreen across the western face of the building. Using elevation studies and interior models, they determined the optimal placement of a series of tinted glass panels held in an aluminum frame developed by Benson Industries. The result is seemingly random arrangement of overlapping rectangles, which ZGF’s Bob Snyder likened to scales on a Samurai’s costume. On the other three sides of the building, ZGF installed a curtain wall of fritted, triple-pane insulated glass units supplied by SYP. The frit pattern was inspired by the nearby John E. Jacqua Academic Center for Student Athletes, which ZGF also designed. The Jacqua’s facade comprises two layers of glass, five feet apart with a stainless steel wire screen in between. At the Hatfield-Dowlin Complex, the designers achieved a similar texture on a single layer of glass. “We saw that as a microcosm of the five-foot wall [at Jacqua],” said Snyder. The frit pattern was developed to be visible from both outside and inside the building, and to suggest movement as one passes along the facade.
  • Facade Manufacturer Benson Industries, SYP, Western Tile & Marble, Streimer Sheet Metal Works
  • Architects ZGF Architects LLP
  • Location Eugene, Oregon
  • Date of Completion August 2013
  • System triple-pane insulated glass curtain wall with frit, floating glass sunscreen, stone, metal panels
The final components of the Hatfield-Dowlin Complex exterior are stone and metal cladding. ZGF chose granite and basalt from Western Tile & Marble, which was treated with water jets for a striated texture. The designers used stone primarily on the first three floors of the building. “We established that as the stone zone, we wanted the weight of that material, the high durability of that material down low where folks would come into contact [with it],” said Snyder. Above, the stone transitions to aluminum panels for a lighter feel. “We worked with [Streimer Sheet Metal Works] to get the tightest radius we could get on the ribs of the metal panel,” explained Snyder. “We really struggled with that material [to make it] as fine as the stone, so it didn’t look like you were wearing tennis shoes with your tuxedo.” Plate-steel fins at the mouth of the parking garage and near the entrance sidewalk suggest the hard back of a dinosaur—yet another reference to armor. For Snyder, the combination of materials on the building’s facade achieve a balance between groundedness and ambition. Like the athletes inside it, the Hatfield-Dowlin Complex remains tied to the earth even as it appears to float above it. “The idea is that to be really good at football, you need to be right on the edge,” said Snyder.
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Product> Master Glass Solutions for Interiors and Facades

As the buzzword "transparency" gains greater meaning in product specification, glass is an energy-saving, sustainable, and aesthetically pleasing option. Strand 3form 3form’s Pressed Glass is newly available in the Strand pattern (above), a compressed interlayer of fine gauge threads in three monochromatic colorways. It can be further customized through color matching, etching, and fritting options. Available in widths as large as 
48 inches and lengths of 120 inches, it can be specified in either a 5/16-inch or 1 5/16-inch gauge thickness. Its inherent strength meets ANSI Z97.1 standards. DF-PA Dichroic Film 3M Architectural Markets 3M’s Dichroic films can be applied to any smooth surface with a pressure sensitive adhesive; the DF-PA is recommended for glass applications. Two color values—Chill and Blaze—span color ranges from blue to magenta to gold, in either a fully covered opacity, or as a decorative graphic. Durability complies with interior and exterior use, and the film can be easily removed from architectural screens, window fronts, curtain walls, or glazing when it is time for an update. Railings and Floors CARVART This structural laminated glass can be safely specified for floors and railings. Flooring can be installed as a freestanding finish or incorporated into another system with specially engineered mounting hardware, and stair treads can appear to “float” or integrate into stringers. For railings, top and side mounting options can be affixed to most structures, or can be suspended from coordinating adjustable point fittings. Railing caps are available in round, oval, or square profiles. Alice General Glass Digital printing directly to glass provides customization options as broad as the imagination of the architect or designer. Bespoke patterns or imagery can be specified, in addition to a selection of bright and monochromatic colors and patterns for glazing, curtain walls, or interior applications. Fully opaque backing is also available, enhancing the contrast and crispness of any printed design. SunGuard Super Neutral 68 Triple Glaze Guardian Industries Guardian SunGuard SuperNeutral 68 glazing offers improved solar control and abundant natural light. The Valley View project shown here uses SunGuard SN 68 triple glaze, providing a visible light transmission of 52 percent and a solar heat gain coefficient of 0.32. SunGuard SN 68 can also be laminated for noise reduction and hurricane protection. KnollTextiles Glass Collection Skyline Design Seven designs from KnollTextiles are rendered on glass through two production techniques:
Eco-etch achieves varying levels of opacity, and AST Digital Glass Printing introduces color to partial transparency. These options provide for customization of classic patterns 
like Divine and Enchantment, designed by Dorothy Cosonas, or the mid-century Cyclone and Fibra, designed by Eszter Haraszty. Liquidkristal Lasvit Designed by Ross Lovegrove, Liquidkristal was inspired by dynamic forms found in nature. The design was first modeled digitally to simulate thermo induction, which can imbue the qualities of water to glass under very high temperatures. A large-scale mold system was formed from the study’s results, to produce multiple pattern variations over multiple sheets. In addition to interior applications, Liquidkristal is also suitable for glazing and facades. Olivia Joel Berman Glass Studios The circular, three-dimensional pattern of Olivia is enhanced with subtle reflectivity to inflect motion into any space. Back painting options are available in a range of colors on panels measuring 53 by 108 inches. Produced for interior applications, it can be tempered for safety and impact resistance on exteriors as well. ClearShade Glazing Unit Panelite A honeycomb-like insert fits between two sheets of glass and redirects up to 70 
percent of natural light, reducing solar glare and heat gain for midday-SHGC measurements 
as low as 0.11. The cellular configuration is made from a durable but transparent polymer that is resistant to UV rays. The product’s bi-directional scattering distribution capabilities are compatible with Radiance, Energy Plus, and SketchUp modeling programs. Sungate 600 PPG This double-glazed insulated glass unit boasts an efficient configuration tailored to the region of application. In climates where heat gain is optimal, coating on the Number 3 
surface blocks heat loss for a U-value of 0.33, while maintaining a 0.65 SHGC and visible light transmittance of 71 percent. For higher insulation values, the Sungate 600 coating can be placed on the Number 4 surface when combined with a solar control low-e glass, for a net gain in U-value of 20 percent. SageGlass Simplicity Sage Electrochromics This electronically tintable glazing is available in a solar-powered, wireless format. In lieu of low-voltage wired connections, a strip of solar photovoltaics interfaces with a low-profile electronic controller and battery pack that can provide power for up to two days without a charge. The wireless system also configures with light and building management programs from Siemens, Lutron, Schneider, and Johnson Controls. Bistro Green Vetrazzo Vetrazzo, the recycled glass division of Polycor, has been diverting glass from the waste stream since 1996. The surfacing material uses consumer beverage containers, waste from glass manufacturers, building demolition, traffic light lenses, windshields, shower doors, and more. It takes nearly 1,000 bottles to make one 5- by 9-foot panel that is 85 percent glass by volume and bound with Portland Cement. Sixteen of Vetrazzo’s product lines are Cradle to Cradle certified. Dynamic Glass View Glass Insulated glass units as large as 5 feet by 10 feet feature programmable electrochromic levels of 60, 40, 20, and 4 percent tinting with user controls from a smart device app to reduce heating and cooling loads, electric lighting, and solar glare. An intelligent setting can be programmed for sensory occupancy to optimize energy usage as well as user comfort. All four tint levels can be achieved in one unit, with adjustment times akin to the passing of a cloud overhead.
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Last Chance! Early Bird Special Ends at Midnight for Facades+PERFORMANCE Chicago

blogbanner(1) You asked, and we extended the Early Bird Special Registration pricing for the Chicago edition of the Facades+ PERFORMANCE conference an extra five days! But act fast, as the discount ends today at midnight for good. Discover the latest high performance building technologies that are revolutionizing the next generation of facades at Facades+ PERFORMANCE! Join AN and Enclos as we present the latest installment of our groundbreaking conference series October 24th-25th at the Mies van der Rohe designed Illinois Institute of Technology campus in Chicago. Be there as leading innovators from across the AEC industries gather to share the cutting-edge strategies and technologies that are redefining performance. Expand your career with our exciting series of symposia, panels, and workshops, and work side-by-side with the industry’s leading professionals. Register before midnight tonight to catch our Early Bird special and save on this incredible opportunity. Space is limited, so act fast! Join our Materials Panel on day one of the conference to learn how to apply the hottest breakthrough materials technologies to your next project. For a preview of the discussion to come, check out this exciting white paper provided by Facades Plus panelist and VP of Sage Glass, Dr. Helen Sanders, in which she explains the cutting-edge technologies and sustainable applications of dynamic electrochromatic glazing. With representatives from SOM, GKD Metal Fabrics, and YKK-AP, this panel is not to be missed. Head over to the full Facades+ PERFORMANCE site to view our highly anticipated roster of presenters and explore the thrilling schedule of workshops, panels and symposia. See you in Chicago!
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Discover the Diversity of Glass at the Architects Forum Glass+Performance at GlassBuild America

On September 11th, the Architects Forum Glass+Performance in Atlanta, Georgia presents some of the biggest names in architecture for a symposium of diverse programs, esteemed speakers, and informative dialogues, all in the name of glass. As part of GlassBuild America: The Glass, Window & Door Exposition, The Architect’s Newspaper and Glass Magazine have teamed up to develop a spectacular lineup addressing the multiplicity of uses of architectural and decorative glass. Registration allows attendees access to the exciting events of the day, including a keynote address by architect Neil M. Denari, as well as entrance to the three day GlassBuild America Trade Show Floor and five Continuing Education Units from the American Institute of Architects. With a diverse program featuring Emil Hoogendoorn of John Moriarty & Associates, Philip Vourvoulis of Triview Glass Industries, Peter Arbour of seele, and similarly esteemed designers, architects, and innovators within the high-performance glass construction and design industry, this exciting event will draw professionals and experts for a forum of concentrated thought and experience. Throughout the day-long symposium, the Architects Forum Glass+Performance provides opportunities for networking and dialogue, and attendees may continue these engagements with those in demo of cutting-edge technologies on the GlassBuild America trade room floor. Lunch is provided and conversation is encouraged. Topics in presentation include: · Architectural Glass Materials Panel · Functional Appeal and Aesthetic Challenges of Glass Design for Today's Building Facades · Structural Glass: Ancient Material Modern Treatment · The Biggest Glass in Miami Dade County: Construction of the Miami Art Museum Facades Register today for a value offer and join the conversation in glass. See the complete September 11th tentative schedule here.
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SHoP Project Engineer Sophie Pennetier at AN’s Facades+PERFORMANCE Chicago

AN’s distinctive Facades+PERFORMANCE conference in Chicago provides participants the exclusive opportunity to engage in in-depth dialogue with frontrunners in the architecture, fabrication, and engineering industries. On October 25th at the Illinois Institute of Technology, workshop leaders such as Sophie Pennetier, Project Engineer at SHoP, will lead intimate discussions conducive to innovation and creative problem-solving. Topics including bent glass, designing for wood fabrication in complex geometries, and integrating performance are on the lineup. Leading a discussion focused on new and existing methods for designing and using cold formed, heat molded, or otherwise double-curved glass, Pennetier, along with Beatriz Fernandez of Cricursa and Franklin Lancaster of Eckersley O’Callaghan, will present real-world case studies. A structural engineer with five years of experience in design, detailing, and construction in complex structures, she specializes in non-conventional structures and envelope systems. Before joining SHoP Construction this year where she has worked on modular construction projects, she worked as a structural engineer at Guy Nordenson and Associates (GNA) in New York, and prior to that as a structural engineer at RFR Consulting in Paris, where she contributed to groundbreaking UHPC curtain wall system development with the Liquid Wall project. As a member of the ASCE-AEI Curtain Wall Committee and the ASTM Committee E06 on Performance of Buildings, she contributes to the development of US structural glass standards. Pennetier has earned a Masters in Mechanics of Materials and Structures at Polytechnic School EPF in Paris and a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering at Polytechnic School in Montreal.
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Explore Glass as a Compelling Facade Material at Glass+Performance on Sept. 11

archforum_bg2 For thousands of years, it has been widely acknowledged that glass is not only a compelling material, but is unbreakable in compression. More recently, glass as an innovative facade technology has steadily surfaced, propelled mainly by prominent international building designers pursuing transparency in building facades. At The Architects Forum Glass+Performance on September 11 at the GlassBuild America expo in Atlanta, Michael Ludvik of M. Ludvik Engineering will present about structural glass in a session titled Structural Glass: Ancient Material Modern Treatment. To explore glass as an appealing facade material, Ludvik will provide project examples including the TKTS Booth at Times Square, the Canopies at the Lincoln Center, and the Sky Dive Dubai wind tunnels. The work is characterized by an architecturally sensitive first principles approach. Ludvik is a structural engineer who gives particular attention to structural glass. Since graduating from the University of Sydney with a BE in Civil Engineering, he has worked as an engineer at notable firms such as Arup, Hardesty & Hanover, and Dewhurst Macfarlane & Partners.  His Brooklyn-based firm M. Ludvik & Co. offers structural, glass, and facade engineering services for both architects and contractors. Register here to hear Ludvik speak about structural glass at Glass+Performance on September 11, 2013!
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Discover The Biggest Glass in Miami Dade County at Glass+Performance in Atlanta on September 11

Earlier this year, AN assembled a list of the most prominent projects rising in Miami. One of the developments, the Herzog & de Meuron–designed Pérez Art Museum (PAMM, formerly the Miami Art Museum), is nearing completion and is scheduled to open to the public by the end of the year. At The Architects Forum Glass+Performance on September 11th in Atlanta, key participants, including Peter Arbour of seele, Vinu Abraham of Architectural Testing, and Emil Hoogendoorn of John Moriarty & Associates will present on the ambitious design and construction process of the Miami Art Museum facade, calling the endeavor The Biggest Glass in Miami Dade County. Positioned on Museum Park overlooking Biscayne Bay, upon what has been declared the Magic City’s “last big piece of public land downtown,” the new museum’s concrete and glass structure gestures to Stiltsville, a vernacular 1930s form of architecture built on the bay. Various column-free exhibition galleries within the 200,000-square-foot, three-story building accommodate works of differing scales. The museum contains an educational complex, auditorium, and digital workspaces, along with a restaurant and store. Shaded by a canopy, the museum is situated on an elevated plinth open to a landscaped veranda and plazas. The Architects Forum is hosting a session at GlassBuild America filled with short presentations of the design, prototype testing, and construction of the museum's state-of-the-art facade. Arbour, Abraham, and Hoogendoorn will explain the multifaceted and impressive process, focusing on the use of glass as a facade material.  A panel discussion and audience Q+A will take place after the presentation. Register to learn about the process behind the Pérez Art Museum's glass facades and discover more information about Session 3: The Biggest Glass in Miami Dade County: Construction of the Miami Art
 Museum Facades.  
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Enclos’ High Performance Facades Series Focuses on Glass, Facade Technology

Glass-clad, cable-net structures are one of today's leading forms of high-transparency facade technology. Since 2009, Enclos has been an authority in the design, engineering, fabrication, and assembly of custom curtain wall systems and structural glass facades. The company has published a number of reports about building skin systems. Volume 1: Skylights of the Facade TecNotes Series focuses on glass in overhead applications and the unique opportunities it brings. On September 11th, Enclos’ Mic Patterson will join AN to discuss glass facades at GlassBuild America: The Architects Forum in Atlanta. Mr. Patterson will share several examples that show how optimal transparency and aesthetic elegance can work together. He will discuss projects such as 51 Louisiana in Washington, D.C., two existing buildings that have been joined by a glass-clad atrium, and Station Place: Security & Exchange Commission Headquarters, also in Washington, D.C., which consists of a 55-foot-long and 60-foot-wide skylight. Mr. Patterson has lectured internationally on various aspects of advanced facade technology and is the author of Structural Glass Facades and Enclosures.
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The Architects Forum Welcomes Neil M. Denari to GlassBuild America

Join AN, in collaboration with Glass Magazine, at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta on September 11 for The Architect's Forum Glass+Performance, an exciting symposium featuring keynote speaker Neil M. Denari. In addition to lunch and three-day access to the GlassBuild America trade show floor, the gathering place for North American glass, window, and door industries, attendees will have the opportunity to learn from Denari, who has taught at UCLA, Columbia, the Bartlett, UC Berkeley, Princeton, and Harvard GSD, and is the author of two bestselling books, Interrupted Projections (1996) and Gyroscopic Horizons (1999). Symposium keynote Neil Denari earned his B.Arch. at the University of Houston and his M.Arch. from Harvard University. Upon graduation, Denari worked as a technical intern in Paris for Aerospatiale Helicoptres (now Airbus). Denari relocated to New York in 1983 where he worked as a senior designer at James Stewart Polshek and Partners (now Ennead Architects), presented his speculative work at many museums, and was the youngest member of 40 Architects Under 40 in 1986. Since then, Denari has led a noteworthy career as an educator and is a tenured Professor in the Architecture and Urban Design Department at UCLA. He has also amassed a lengthy list of awards: in 2002, he received the Richard Recchia Award and the Samuel F.B. Morse Medal for architecture from the National Academy of Design in New York. In 2008, he received an Academy Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Then, in 2009, he received a Fellowship from the United States Artists organization. Two years later, Denari earned Los Angeles AIA’s Gold Medal, the highest honor for an individual architect. His firm Neil M. Denari Architects is based in Los Angeles. A registered architect in New York and California and member of the American Institute of Architects, his position as featured keynote at The Architects Forum will make for an exceptionally educational Glass+Performance symposium.
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Live At Glassbuild Architects Forum: Experts Talk Engineering Big Glass For Herzog & de Meuron’s Miami Art Museum

There are many reasons not to miss the new Architects Forum at Glassbuild this year. For one, Neil Denari will be giving the keynote speech. For two, members of the project team will be giving a presentation on the design, prototype testing, and construction of the facade of Herzog & de Meuron's new Miami Art Museum. This unique building features integrated plantings, multiple micro climates, and some of the biggest expanses of glass in all of Miami Dade County. The presentation will be led by Peter Arbour, a facade designer with a Master of Architecture from Yale University who currently works in the New York office of German facade builder seele. Peter has worked for Israel Berger and Associates, Dewhurst Macfarlane and Partners and RFR Consulting Engineers in Paris. Peter’s project works include 40 Bond Street, with Herzog & de Meuron; the Times Square TKTS booth in with Nick Leahy; the Tour Phare, Paris, with Morphosis; the Grand Museum of Egypt, with Heneghan Peng Architects; and the Broad Museum with Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Peter is the designer and patent holder of the Liquid Wall curtain wall system.
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Frank Gehry’s Ice Blocks Chilling Out Inside Chicago’s Inland Steel Building

Follow the Architecture Chicago Plus blog as Lynn Becker raises an eyebrow at the new sculpture that quietly popped up in the lobby of downtown Chicago’s celebrated Inland Steel Building. The 1957 SOM icon seems to have acquired a consortium of ice hunks, courtesy Frank Gehry. Ostensibly a formal counterpoint to the elegant energy of Richard Lippold’s Radiant I, the original lobby art, Gehry’s glass agglomeration (fabricated by the John Lewis Glass Studio of Oakland, California) frames Radiant I and responds to its angularity with carved blobs. It’s admittedly atypical in the setting of the modernist masterpiece, but doesn’t overpower the space or the original artwork.
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Pelli Clarke Pelli’s Transbay Center Glass Facade Could Become Perforated Metal

[beforeafter] transbay_facade_01a transbay_facade_01b [/beforeafter]   The perforated aluminum skin would replace the previously proposed glass facade. (Courtesy TJPA) It looks like Pelli Clarke Pelli's Transbay Transit Center, which stretches about three blocks through the city's Rincon Hill neighborhood, might go ahead with its first major piece of value engineering. According to the San Francisco Chronicle, the architects have suggested that the building's undulating glass skin become perforated aluminum. The move would meet federal safety guidelines and chop $17 million from the estimated $1.59 billion budget for the center's first phase. The Transbay Joint Powers Authority (TJPA) board will be  asked to approve the change at its March 25 meeting. The structure is not expected to be complete before 2017. [beforeafter] transbay_facade_03a transbay_facade_03b [/beforeafter]   "This is a dramatic change in material, but the philosophical change is not enormous," said Fred Clarke of the firm Pelli Clarke Pelli, who said the terminal would still feel light, not heavy. Chronicle critic John King warned that the move "could make the transit center less of a sinuous, snaking form—and more of a drab block—as it spans First and Fremont streets." On Pelli's side, Clarke argued that the wrapping would still be transparent. Of course he admitted: "Architects who do this kind of building must be very, very pragmatic."