Posts tagged with "Glass":

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MIT researcher aims to expand the role of glass in construction

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Architect and educator Cristina Parreño’s ongoing research project at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is called “Tectonics of Transparency” and it's challenging the “generic-ness” of glass in construction today. The project is being realized through a unique format of prototypes divided into three formal categories: the Wall Series, Tower Series, and Shelter Series. Each type is further broken down into scales: a “model scale” of 8-cubic-feet, and an “installation scale” of inhabitable size. The format allows for experimentation with technique, and for multiple funding sources to support various components of the project. Parreño pinpoints her interest in expanding the role of glass to a 1950s patent on “float glass” by Pilkington, who developed a process for efficiently manufacturing large flat sheets of the material. “Despite its potential, modern technology didn’t fully exploit the multitude of material attributes offered by glazing, which in a flat, planar state can only be used as a non-structural infill,” Parreño told The Architect's Newspaper (AN) in an interview. “When expanded to a greater depth, glass acquires multiple properties that expand its role beyond that of a transparent or translucent infill. If we attend to some of these properties—which are not fully exploited when glass is presented in its planar state—we can begin to foresee another type of depth between the two sides of the material.” Parreño’s prototypes are primarily interested in exploiting the material’s compressive strength, along with producing new tactile and visual effects.
  • Facade Manufacturer Shouguang Jingmei Glass Product Co.,Ltd
  • Architects Cristina Parreño Architecture
  • Facade Installer Cristina Parreño Architecture with Turner Construction Special Projects Division (Tower Series assembly)
  • Facade Consultants Paul Kassabian, Simpson Gumpertz & Heger (structural engineer)
  • Location Boston, MA
  • Date of Completion 2014-15
  • System clear sheet glass with UV-cured bonding agent
  • Products Glaverbel glass by Shouguang Jingmei; UV-cured adhesive by Loctite
  • Photos John Horner, Jane Messinger (Courtesy Cristina Parreño Archtiecture)
One of the main challenges of the project has been developing new working techniques to manage the fragility of the panes during fabrication. This fragility provides only small tolerances for assembly that in turn demand a high degree of precision. Parreño’s assemblies involve bonding individual profiles of glass together using a high-performance bonding agent activated by UV light. The compound cures thin and transparent, allowing for maximum visibility between panes. Parreño says this construction system permits the glass to fully express its own visual and structural capacities, but it makes the construction process far more labor intensive. The Tectonics of Transparency prototypes are a material translation of well-known concrete and brick structures to glass, as MVRDV recently developed for their Amsterdam Chanel store project. Parreño said MVRDV’s project demonstrates similar interests to hers, and that the interest of other architects in challenging the conventional use of glass “thickens the plot for discussions.” Parreño’s Tower Series reinterprets Uruguayan brick water towers built by Eladio Dieste, while her Shelter Series reinterprets Felix Candela’s ruled Mexican concrete surface structures. Beyond explorations into the structural capacity of glass, Parreño also relates to the qualities of light inherent through assembly techniques. She cites REX’s fluted facade as a reinvented curtain wall of curved panels that “catch light in unexpected angles, throwing distorted reflections back at the viewer.” These visual effects are a key influencer of Parreño’s Tectonics of Transparency: “By exploring the ability of glass to modulate light through its enhanced translucency, variable transparency, opacity and the greater or lesser internal reflection of external light.” Parreño says her next steps are to continue to “scale up” the prototypes, experimenting with how glass can move beyond the curtain wall. “The translation of these prototypes and small pavilions to a larger and more architectural scale is something that I am definitely interested in as the next step forward.”
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How L.A.’s glass Skyslide stays strong 1,000 feet in the air, even through an earthquake

What is it like to whiz through a glass slide 1,000 feet above Los Angeles with nothing to hold on to other than a gray wool mat? The experience is so terrifying one would be forgiven for blocking out the memory entirely—but, thanks to the structural engineering capabilities of Brooklyn-based M. Ludvik Engineering, it is also incredibly safe. “We tested the pants off of absolutely everything,” Michael Ludvik, a structural engineer, told The Architect's Newspaper as he discussed the structural design for L.A.’s newest thrill-seeking-tourist attraction, the Skyslide at OUE Skyspace L.A.

OUE Skyspace is part of a Gensler-designed, $60 million overhaul of the public areas of the 1,018-foot-tall, Pei Cobb Freed & Partners–designed U.S. Bank Tower; the renovations include a new ground-level plaza and lobby and, on the 54th floor of the tower, a snaking labyrinth of “digital interactivity” spaces, with moody hallways, panoramic video displays, and movement-sensitive light installations.

The real big-ticket item, however, is the OUE Skyspace $8-per-ride Skyslide, a 1¼-inch-thick glass-panel slide that exits the building’s envelope at the 70th floor, curves out over the city 1,000 feet below, and swoops back onto an outdoor terrace at the 69th floor, where the rider is unceremoniously dumped onto a red, padded mat. Ludvik explained, “The majority of the glass is tempered and laminated with a special structural interlayer called SentryGlas [made by Kuraray], which is the same product used for hurricane glazing in Miami-Dade County. We also have some glass with a complex bent geometry, where tempering was not possible, so we chemically strengthened the glass to be as strong as steel.” It is no wonder that the slide, located as it is in a seismically active region, atop a building designed to sway as many as 30 feet during an earthquake, was engineered with a complex array of articulated, “soft touch” connections, containing ball joints that allow the slide to move independently of the massive building, that can carry a purported 40,000 pounds of pressure per connection (that’s the weight of a New York City subway car). “It would be scary as hell, but the glass wouldn’t break,” Ludvik said of the unlucky experience of riding the slide during an earthquake. “There is a system of pins which allow the glass to pivot and to be undamaged by the building’s inelastic seismic movements, plus a 2.4 g-force seismic acceleration capacity, all with a large factor of safety. This thing is a machine as much as a structure.”

Since each sheet of glass requires a structural joint that not only creates a point of potential structural weakness but, for the slide user, also the opportunity for a bumpy ride, Ludvik and his team designed Skyslide using Nastran, a stress analysis software used by NASA, to include as few pieces of glass as possible. They also worked with a complex, multinational team of fabricators to complete different portions of the slide. Renowned, China-based industrial-glass manufacturer North Glass fabricated the straight run of the slide, while the Italian company Sunglass crafted the curved portions.   

Also important to the design of the slide were maintenance and cleaning operations, concerns about which resulted in the installation of operable windows along the tower’s facade facing the inboard side of the slide, so a traditional window-washing rig can reach it. “I will let you know how it all works after they hang me off the side for the first maintenance inspection,” Ludvik said. 

Resources

Structural Engineering Services M. Ludvik Engineering

Structural Glass North Glass Sunglass SentryGlas by Kuraray
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High-performance glass with innovative technology

Thanks to new technological innovations, glass facades not only assist in LEED certification but also offer a wide range of variety, from glass panels to dynamic options.

LightZone SageGlass

With the ability to create up to three variable tint zones within a single pane, Lightzone controls sunlight to optimize daylight, maintain views, and prevent glare. It also provides a lot of design freedom for building envelopes because it is available in myriad geometric shapes, sizes, colors, and zoning patterns. It also reduces overall energy loads by up to 20 percent and peak energy demand by up to 26 percent.

Lamberts Glass Bendheim

The first channel glass to receive bird-smart certification, Lamberts glass has been scientifically proven to be visible to birds. Not only is bird strike jarring to occupants, but it is also estimated that up to a billion birds a year are killed in the U.S. alone due to collisions with glass buildings.

CrystalBlue Guardian Industries

CrystalBlue can be combined with many SunGuard low-E products to provide a range of energy performances along with high visible light transmission, now with a blue color. It is available coated and uncoated at 6 millimeter thickness in a variety of sizes.

Oversize Format Low-E Glass sedak

As a pioneer for glass in oversize formats up to 10.5 by 49 feet, sedak’s new insulating glass line automates the production process completely, leading to high-quality fabrication that can easily be reproduced. Additionally, large scale translucent units can be printed fully covered with the roller coater technique or with a digital flat bed printer, allowing for complex, colorful designs.

Low-E Coated Acid-etched Glass Walker Glass and PPG

PPG’s Solarban low-E glass is paired with Walker’s collection of acid-etched finishes, including bird-safe AviProtek glass, to expand the range of aesthetic and performance options available for energy efficient, environmentally progressive glass.

SolarSmart Innovative Glass Corp

A heat-blocking, self-tinting smart glass that darkens in response to solar heat gain to keep interiors cool, lowering energy usage and costs. The hotter the glass gets, the darker the glass will tint—it is 100 percent solar activated, requiring no power, wires, or user involvement.

cert5421-01-Ecophon-Product-feature-596x322-R1

CertainTeed

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Daniel Buren’s “Observatory of Light” set to open at Fondation Louis Vuitton

Starting on May 11 this year, Frank Gehry's Fondation Louis Vuitton building in Paris is set to host a dazzling glass installation by French conceptual artist, Daniel Buren. Titled L’Observatoire de la lumière (or Observatory of Light) the installation will see some 3,600 tiles of glass alongside a series of colored filters, broken up at regular intervals by alternating vertical white and blank stripes. The articulation of light and interplay of color spans across the building's twelve classic Gehry-style volumes, known as "sails," working in sync with the Gehry's design which, until now, employed a colorless paneled facade. Making use of thirteen different colors, arranged to create the illusion of forms disappearing at different times during the day, light entering the building through these filters will enhance the interior spaces, changing their spatial qualities. Bernard Arnault, President of the Fondation Louis Vuitton said “Daniel Buren has designed a grandiose project, pertinent and enchanting, the result of a real dialogue with Frank Gehry and his building.” "The transparency and quality of a colour projected by means of a coloured filter, as I see it, make it much more alive than painted colour covering a surface” said Buren in a Press Release. “There is a quantity of mirror effects here at the Fondation that actually don’t come from mirrors but from the windows. Almost everywhere something is reflected (...) through the coloring of the sails, all those reflections will become more and more present and will awake those sleeping mirrors that are everywhere. I think that this will enable visitors to further understand and enjoy the singularity of this architecture,” continued Buren. To commemorate the installation opening, a catalogue, designed in collaboration with Buren, will amalgamate works touching on color, transparency, light, translucency, and projection all created since the 1970s. Alongside L’Observatoire de la lumière, a theatrical piece will be shown from June 2 to 4. BurenCirque: 3 times another Hut revolves around three fairground inspired huts. Again using light as a key theme, the huts will become "translucent and mysterious lanterns at night." The piece was conceived in the early 2000's by Buren working with brothers Dan and Fabien Demuynck. Children visiting the Fondation Louis Vuitton will also be able to appreciate and engage in Buren's light spectacle. Aimed at children aged six to ten, The Light Trap lets the projections and reflections of color within the building form a giant kaleidoscope. A workshop will then allow the children to explore different opacities and discover how light can alter space perception. The Light Trap will run from May 28 to August 28, every Saturday and Sunday, from 2:30–5pm.
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Trend Spotting at Salone del Mobile in Milan: Chromatic Glass

There have been plenty of color and style trends occurring in Milan but the one that really took us by surprise was rainbow spectrum glass.
This collection of mirrors, side tables, and dining tables is a collaboration between Glas Italia and Patricia Urquiola (who herself seemed to be trending at the fair, with products designed for multiple brands).
At SuperDesign Show 3M, the maker of post-its collaborated with Stefano Boeri Architetti on an installation that uses films, nonwovens, and adhesives to create a kaleidoscopic tree that reflects light in colorful patterns and allows guests to recharge.
Eli5e designer Elise Luttik debuted a pair of chairs (at Salone Satellite) that really stood out—one stationary and another that swivels. The pair reflects geometric shapes on the wall and would liven up any office or home.
AGC Glass, a Japanese company that's a leading manufacturer of glass, chemicals, and high-tech materials, crafted an art installation at SuperDesign Show entitled Amorphous. It was inspired by amorphous molecular structures that don't have a definite shape. The installationis made with 5,000 pieces of thin, chemically-strengthened glass that fracture the light and creates a stunning display.
Also showing in the Satellite was Ini Archibong, who had been commissioned by design label Amen&Amen to create a collection inspired by literature and fantasy called The Secret Garden.
 The COG installation at Spazio Orlandi was designed by Moritz Waldemeyer for watch brand Panerai.
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Construction underway on SO-IL–designed UC Davis Art Museum

UC Davis is set to open the Jan Shrem and Maria Manetti Shrem Museum of Art to the public on November 13. After choosing SO-IL to design its on-campus museum in 2013, the school has been hard at work constructing what it envisions as a "hub of creative practice." Working alongside San Francisco-based firm Bohlin Cywinski Jackson and Whiting Turner, the museum features a 50,000-square-foot canopy made from aluminum triangular beams. The canopy is supported by straight and curved glass walls interweaving both open and closed spaces. Its shape, according to SO-IL, represents a "new symbol" for the campus with its natural surroundings of long, green plains making up the sensory landscape of UC Davis. In its designs, SO-IL emphasized the importance of capturing the essence of the California Central Valley. Changes in season and lighting will be reflected from within the museum which will play host to a variety of activities and programs both informal and formal. The inaugural show will feature work from artists Arneson, William T. Wiley, Manuel Neri, Wayne Thiebaud and Ruth Horsting among others. And with the date for its grand opening months away, the Jan Shrem and Maria Manetti Shrem Museum looks set to become a site of interactive and cutting edge learning.
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Ingalill Wahlroos-Ritter shares lessons learned through teaching architecture

For Ingalill Wahlroos-Ritter, associate dean at Woodbury University School of Architecture, director of  WUHO Gallery, and co-founder of [WROAD], architectural practice and education are inextricably intertwined. Wahlroos-Ritter, who joins moderator Alexander Korter (CO Architects) and co-presenters Michael Fox (Cal Poly Pomona), Quinyun Ma (USC), and Neil Denari (UCLA) in a panel on "Facade Education: Preparing Future Practitioners for True Performance" at next month's Facades+ LA conference, first taught at Cornell University after her work as project architect on the Corning Museum of Glass attracted the school's attention. That initial seminar, on the innovative use of glass in building envelopes, helped her carve out a professional niche in the field and also led to an appointment at Yale. At the time, recalled Wahlroos-Ritter, Yale did not offer courses like hers—neither classes on glass, specifically, nor on the intersection of architecture and engineering more generally. "That has changed a lot, [especially] when I think back on when I went to school," she said. The contemporary accreditation process, for one thing, "has elevated the need for systems integration," explained Wahlroos-Ritter. While in the past it had not been unusual for students and faculty from other disciplines to consult on student work, she said, "to rely on engineers to complete a project is new." Her students' relationship to technology like the performance simulation platform Autodesk Ecotect Analysis has also evolved since Wahlroos-Ritter began teaching. "Students are conversant with Ecotect as part of learning BIM," said Wahlroos-Ritter. "That's something I'm seeing more and more in curricula." Meanwhile, students gain hands-on experience in fabrication by building mock-ups of building envelope components. "I think in some ways the academy is leading that part of the conversation," said Wahlroos-Ritter. "Students are learning tools that aren't necessarily part of the trade. Many senior architects don't have the skills these students do." Wahlroos-Ritter relishes her job molding young minds. "For me, one of the exciting moments is the epiphany where students begin to see systems as an intrinsic part of design" rather than something to consider as a postscript, she said. "I talk about Louis Sullivan a lot. He considered the building a living, breathing organism—then everybody forgot about it, of course. I think there's a renewed appreciation for the role building systems can have in the perceptual narrative of a building." Catch up with Wahlroos-Ritter and other facade educators, designers, fabricators, builders, and researchers at Facades+ LA January 28–29. Register today on the conference website.
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Product> Dynamic and Modern Architectural Glass Products

Architectural glass is making a big splash in the A&D industry. Featuring bold colors, creative design patterns, and crystal-clear views, architectural glass is quickly becoming an extremely versatile design material. Willow Glass Corning

This super thin, flexible glass can be rolled onto a traditional flat building material, such as MDF, to create a durable laminate that can be easily cut on-site.

SunGuard SNX 51/23 Guardian  

Designed to offer the most light with the lowest heat, triple silver SunGuard SNX 51/23 is a commercial low-e glass product with visible light transmission at 51 percent and a solar heat gain coefficient at .23 on clear float glass.

View Intelligence 2.0 View Dynamic Glass

The algorithm that controls the tinting process of this dynamic glass system works with advanced weather inputs, enabling it to predict not only the sun’s movement, but also short-term and long-term weather conditions.

Glascene Asahi Glass Company

A combination of glass and screen, this material allows images to be projected onto clear glass without blocking the view beyond. Available in a range of thicknesses and screen sizes of 100-inches and larger, the product can accommodate front- and rear-projection designs.

LightWise Pittsburgh Corning

These glass block units install like traditional windows with built-in nailing fins, so there is no additional assembly required. They provide privacy, security, and light-control while meeting Energy Star requirements.

Corning Med-X McGrory Glass

Architects can design medical X-ray viewing windows with a wider field of vision and improved comfort, thanks to the large 108- by 54-inch size of this glass. Other applications include screens for medical diagnostics, protection windows in laboratories, and airport security X-ray screens.

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Product> Glass as Art: Five Decorative Glass Masterpieces

Designers can enhance the look of any interior environment by incorporating expressive and unique decorative glass into the mix. From printed patterns to colorful and bold layers, decorative glass helps transform interior spaces into well-outfitted works of art. Cipher, Overlay, Check Skyline Design The three patterns in this collection are characterized by repeating, layered motifs in colors printed on both sides of the glass. The images can be executed in a variety of techniques, in opaque, translucent, and transparent options, allowing for different degrees of translucency and privacy. Designed by Patricia Urquiola. Alice General Glass Using direct-to-glass printing technology, patterns can be scaled and colored to spec for interior and exterior applications. Alight Pulp Studio Alight is not just a bas-relief glass product, but can be specified as a fully engineered wall system, inclusive of structural steel and other components. Created by Amses Cosma Studio. Expressions Collection Pittsburgh Corning The Expressions Collection enhances the cosmetic appeal of traditional glass block without compromising its functional benefits of security, privacy, light transmission, and fire ratings. A variety of stock images and murals are printed on eight- by eight-inch by four-inch nominal size glass block in the Decora pattern; custom design services are also offered. Wire In Glass Rudy Art Glass A variety of metal meshes are laminated into a range of textured and tinted glass, resulting in an unusually expressive collection.
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Product> Rose-Colored Glasses: Innovative Glass Comes in New Colors and Textures

Decorative glass is making a comeback in a big way thanks to new technologies that take patterns, textures, and colors to the next level. From watercolor prints to trippy, LED illuminated panels and graphic etchings; there are updated options for every room. Painterly Collection 3form Original hand-painted compositions are photographed and encapsulated into the Infinite Glass material. The collection comprises five designs in five complementary colorways. C1 Collection Carvart Taking hand-drawn lines as inspiration, these 12 geometric patterns are available in small and large scales, positive and negative designs, and single- and double-sided etched formats. Designed by Ferreira Design Company. Sizzle Stix Bullseye Glass Thin strips of dichroic glass form an eye-catching accent when set into a field of plain material. Available in two widths. Willow Nathan Allan Glass Studios A kiln-formed patterned glass that is texture-free, Willow is equally sinuous and structured. It is available tempered or laminated, and comes in several tints and colors. Illuminated Art Glass liquidoranges STUDIO These panels are created using two layers of low-iron PPG Starphire glass laminated with a high-resolution artwork interlayer. The edges are polished and the panels are face-mounted to aluminum frames and backlit with dimmable Fawoo Lumisheet LED panels. Isola Murano Glass Soli The rich colors and intricate patterns of authentic, handmade Murano glass can be combined into one-of-a-kind architectural installations.
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Are glass skyscrapers still the way forward?

In the wake of a slew of criticisms on numerous glass skyscrapers' over-reflective properties, some architects and critics are asking if it's time to reassess our view on using glass facades in the future. Contemporary architecture today is at a crossroads: Do we continue to enamor the structures that reach up into the sky in a display of corporate might with reflective sheaths of glass? Take advantage of the new technology that is allowing the sun to power these buildings? Or do we take a step back and re-evaluate our position on the all-glass facade altogether? Fred A. Bernstein of the Architectural Record laments that today the "relentless repetition of glass facades leads to a numbing sameness." "Is that a building?" said a designer to Bernstein , "I thought it was a pavilion for a plexiglass convention." It's no surprise that the person, who was passing by Fumihiko Maki's creation at 51 Astor Place, feels disillusioned. At one end of the spectrum, you have cities like Bath in England where such glass behemoths are nowhere to be found. You are surrounded by the Georgian works of John Palmer, who's Lansdown Crescent, despite its scale, is not overwhelming. At the other end, you have cities like Hong Kong and Shanghai, which are filled with an unprecedented amount of glass high-rise structures, their facades lost in the sky with light bouncing off one another. Where then, do we draw the line? With modern skyscrapers being the architectural product of an ever changing, neo-liberalist, globalization obsessed corporate society, such a line may even be impossible to draw. The case for glass—to pardon the pun—is clear. For companies, having floor to ceiling windows helps break down the stratified hierarchy that was once commonplace in such office buildings by giving all employees, not just the boss, a panoramic view. When used effectively, an elegant glass facade can convey honesty and open-mindedness and even perhaps financial transparency. This may be why the style is so popular amongst financial firms, despite the fact this isn't always the case. Developers are also under pressure to maximize space. Having a thin skin such as glass is an easy solution that enables the architect to sell the building's space as good value for money. Plus, the advancement of photovoltaic cells now means that they can be installed as windows, further advocating the facade style as an economically viable asset. PV company SolarWindow, which specializes in PV-based window solutions claims that when installed on four sides of a 50-story building, 1.3 gigawatt-hours of energy can be generated. Architect Ken Shuttleworth however, has different ideas. Despite being part of the team behind the glass clad Swiss Rae building in London, he has since done a U-turn by stating that he is "rethinking" everything he as done in the last 40 years. Shuttleworth's voice is echoed by many in what is an emerging discourse on the glass structures that run the risk of becoming the scourge of the skyline. "We need to be much more responsible in terms of the way we shade our buildings and the way we thermally think about our buildings," he told the BBC last year. The only thing that appears to be halting the perpetual rise of the glass facade in the United States is a shortage in the material. Failure of the market to produce however, has not stopped developers, who according to WSJ’s Robbie Whelan, have now delved into the glass manufacturing industry. Developer, Related Cos has even gone so far as to take production methods into its own hands—building its own glass factory to create the largest private development in American history. Bruce Beal Jr., Related’s president chose to embark on the endeavor for a handful of skyscrapers and apartments on Manhattan’s West Side as part of the Hudson Yards scheme. Across the Atlantic, the trade association "Glass for Europe" is understandably keen to dismiss the growing concern about the once ubiquitous glass facade and advocate the fact that glass is fully recyclable. Pressure from trade unions isn't enough it seems to sway architecture critic Tom Dyckhoff who, like Shuttleworth, isn't a fan of the glass skyscraper. Speaking to the BBC he said, "as someone who spends their entire life staring at buildings, I am a bit bored by the glass box. They were radical in the 1920s and now they are just cliches, expensive ones at that," he said. "Now we are having to be more thoughtful about how and where we use glass. Maybe architects will become more inventive in how they use windows, instead of plastering them across whole facades." Technological advancements may be the only way this question will truly be answered, but for now, money talks and that appears to be what governs the modern architectural style today.
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Who needs Paris? Chinese copycat culture strikes again with I.M. Pei’s Louvre

China is no stranger to unashamedly ripping off landmark Western structures—the country has replicas of the Eiffel Tower and several renditions of the White House. However, this time they have copied one of their own architects, I. M. Pei, with a 1:1 duplicate of the Louvre in a Shijiazhuang theme park. The latest addition to the country's collection of replica Parisian architecture lies among overgrown shrubs and unkempt grass in an obscure amusement park in Hebei province. Perhaps unsurprisingly, it sits adjacent to an ancient Egyptian Sphynx. China has already created "Little Paris" in Yuhang, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (East China), which features more mock-Parisian style architecture replete with Tower de Eiffel (though not the real one, obviously). Is this latest piece of "mockitecture" a tipping point or a simply one of more to come?