Posts tagged with "Getty":

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The Getty Trust will invest $100M in a 10-year plan to save global artifacts

In a statement of its dedication to conservation efforts, the J. Paul Getty Trust has announced a $100 million investment to support the preservation of global antiquities. The funding will provide the baseline for Ancient Worlds Now: A Future for the Past, a broader incentive focusing on the scholarship, conservation, and exhibition of increasingly fading antiquities in an age where a number of factors pose a threat to their safety. “In an age of resurgent populism, sectarian violence, and climate change, the future of the world’s common heritage is at risk,” said James Cuno, president and CEO of the J. Paul Getty Trust.  “Cultural heritage embodies a global community united by a common need to make things of beauty and usefulness and to compose stories and rituals about humanity’s place in the world. We will launch with urgency and build momentum for years to come. This work must start now, before more cultural heritage is neglected, damaged, or destroyed. Much is at stake.” The initiative presents a notable expansion beyond the focus areas of ancient Greece and Rome that have remained at the forefront of Getty’s funding until now. A global expansion into new territories like South and Central America, Asia, and Africa will ensure that conservation efforts are as comprehensive as possible. While Ancient Worlds Now: A Future for the Past will take a number of forms during its 10-year timeline, one of the biggest components will be increasing conservation efficiency by utilizing local talent. The program will train local conservators and specialists from around the world to work on-site, eliminating the need for Getty employees to manage individual projects. Additional plans include support for digital mapping of excavations, traveling research seminars, and expanded upcoming exhibitions at Los Angeles's Getty Museum highlighting the ancient classical world. Getty plans to partner with major global cultural and educational institutions as well as government organizations and private sector entities in order to maximize the impact of the project. A cross-disciplinary focus will be enacted through the involvement of Getty’s four programs—The Getty Foundation, Getty Research Institute, Getty Conservation Institute, and the J. Paul Getty Museum. As Getty continues to engage its partnerships, an official program launch is slated for summer 2020; the initiative is expected to last through 2030 and beyond.

We Built It: Moby Riffs On LA Architecture for Pacific Standard Time Presents

It’s obvious that Moby, whose L.A. architecture blog has become quite the sensation, has now become the official mainstream spokesperson for the city’s design community. First he made the big address starting off the AIA/LA awards in Santa Monica. Now he put together a video (above) to accompany his address for the kickoff of the Getty’s Pacific Standard Time Presents: Modern Architecture in L.A. Some of Moby's many statements about LA architecture: "baffling," byzantine," "mind-numbingly complicated," "fantastically uncohesive," and, a little better, "LA has the most diverse, interesting architecture of any city on the planet." Now we can only guess where he’ll pop up next. Meanwhile he becomes the latest in a line of celebs the Getty has tapped to promote its offerings, from Ice Cube to Anthony Kiedis. Move over Starchitects. Here come architecture stars.
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Getty Kicks Off Pacific Standard Time Presents: "Modern Architecture in LA"

In front of a packed room inside the Capitol Records building in Hollywood yesterday, the Getty announced details of the next installment of Pacific Standard Time, the popular series of art and architecture exhibitions that helped reframe Los Angeles’ position on the map of worldwide arts and culture. Sporting a new moniker, Pacific Standard Time Presents: Modern Architecture in L.A. will be smaller in scope than the previous iteration, with eleven exhibitions and accompanying programs in and around Los Angeles scheduled for April through July 2013. Among the offerings, anticipated favorites include Overdrive: L.A. Constructs the Future, 1940–1990 at the Getty, A New Sculpturalism: Contemporary Architecture from Southern California at MOCA, and A. Quincy Jones: Building for Better Living at the Hammer Museum. The one noticeable outlier among the offerings of PSTP’s museum partners is the name Peter Zumthor, who will be the focus of one of LACMA’s exhibits: The Presence of the Past: Peter Zumthor Reconsiders LACMA. The kickoff event’s final speakers, Eric Owen Moss and Michael Maltzan, balked at the larger implications of lionizing the tradition of architecture in Los Angeles. Moss pointed out the “paradox of benediction” by the Getty for Los Angeles architecture scene: "What makes this a speculative endeavor is exactly the prospect that it might fail," he noted. Maltzan echoed the idea that L.A.’s history is still in the process of revision: “It’s reasonable to argue that there is not another city in the world that has a more continuous project of modernist development than in Los Angeles.” While worrying that "the mistakes we make here are often played out again and again at even greater scale," Maltzan pointed to experimentation as the attraction for so many architects that have come to Los Angeles: “The majority that came here and stayed here did so because Los Angeles was a hotbed of creativity and possibility. You can make things here. You’ve always been able to. While that seems like a simple idea—it should be easy anywhere—it isn’t.” Here's a full list of institutions taking part in Modern Architecture in L.A.: Exhibitions A New Sculpturalism: Contemporary Architecture from Southern California (MOCA)
Quincy Jones: Building For Better Living (Hammer) The Presence of the Past: Peter Zumthor Reconsiders LACMA (LACMA) Stephen Prina: As He Remembered It (LACMA) Technology and Environment: The Postwar House in Southern California (W. Keith and Janet Kellogg University Art Gallery, Cal Poly Pomona) Everything Loose Will Land (MAK Center for Art and Architecture) Windshield Perspective (A+D Architecture and Design Museum) A Confederacy of Heretics: The Architecture Gallery, Venice, 1979 (SCI-Arc) Outside In: The Architecture of Smith and Williams (Art, Design & Architecture Museum, UC Santa Barbara)
Programming
Center for Land Use Interpretation for On-Site Office Trailers: Invisible Architecture of the Urban Environment, an exhibition of original photography and related construction site tours. Community Art Resources, Inc. for CicLAvia: Modern Architecture on Wilshire Blvd, an architectural guide and special programming as part of their June 2013 car-free/open streets event. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens for the online exhibition, Form and Landscape: Southern California Edison and the Los Angeles Basin, and public programming. Los Angeles Conservancy for Curating the City: Modern Architecture in L.A., an interactive online resource as well as tours, public programs and print material. Los Angeles Philharmonic for The Mozart/Da Ponte Trilogy Conversation, a discussion with Pritzker Prize-winning architects who are designing sets for this unique interdisciplinary series. Machine Project for The Machine Project Field Guide to L.A. Architecture, a performance series at architectural sites across the city. Pasadena Heritage for Pasadena 1940 Forward: Residential Architecture of the Recent Past, a tour of modernist homes in the Pasadena area along with a related lecture and oral history project. UCLA Architecture and Urban Design for Extreme IDEAS: Architecture at the Intersection, a series of discussions about the dynamic and interdisciplinary future of architecture.
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Ice Cube, the Architectural Draftsman and Eames Enthusiast

Since an unofficial concept ad was leaked (above, left) in September proclaiming "Ice Cube celebrates Ray & Charles Eames," the web has been abuzz about the rapper's upcoming film on the architects' influence on his life, part of the Getty's Pacific Standard Time series of exhibitions in Los Angeles. For the exhibition on Ray and Charles Eames, Ice Cube recreated an old ad (above, right) from the 1950s, complete with a pipe and a 1953 DAT Chair. Cube, it appears, studied architectural drafting, although he never got his degree.  He joins LA stars like Red Hot Chili Peppers singer Anthony Kiedis and actor Jason Schwartzman in promoting the epic series, which continues through next year.
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Fire On The Mountain

It's not every day that a scary fire burns within a few miles of a major cultural institution. Well in LA it sort of is, but that's beside the point. A recent drive on the 405 Freeway revealed to us what all the news reports are saying: There is a biggish blaze burning just one hill over from the Getty Center on LA's west side. The smoke is thick and brown, and on first look bulged out at the top, not unlike a mushroom cloud. Yikes. Helicopters are running regular passes over the thing, which is spreading in thin lines along the mountains facing the Getty, moving southward down the Sepulveda Pass. But fortunately it appears that firefighters have it under control (in California terms a 10-acre fire is only a mini conflagration), despite a forced evacuation of the Getty and nearby Mount St. Mary's College. Stay tuned... We hope we don't have to see if all that marble and granite will hold up to a good ol' California disaster. And for now, the biggest concern of drivers on the 405 is the threat of imminent traffic. Now that's scary.