Posts tagged with "Galleries":

Placeholder Alt Text

The Night Gallery projects architectural visualizations into the streets of Chicago

On a quiet street on Chicago’s South Side, a six-foot-by-seven-foot screen glows every night from sunset to sunrise. The glowing storefront window is known as The Night Gallery. In month-long installations, The Night Gallery projects architectural visualizations ranging from algorithmic generative drawings to looping coded animations. The architecture office Future Firm hosts The Night Gallery on its storefront. The young practice launched the gallery in May to showcase the works of other young practices dabbling in video. The current show, opened last Friday, is entitled An Algorithm for Living in. Produced by Los Angeles–based speculative designer Lee Cody, the show explores the “space of your google search history.” Past shows include When the Drawing is Moving by Carl Lostritto and Another Campo Marzio by Outpost Office. When the Drawing is Moving explored randomness in computational animated line drawings. Another Campo Marzio uses coding software to reexamine Piranesi’s classic Campo Marzio etchings, re-configuring urban fragments into a continuous streaming animation. The next two installations will be The Enchanted Forest: Satellite Canopies and Digital Understories by Jenny Rodenhouse and (Another) Rear Window by BairBalliet. The final installation, which will run through November, has yet to be announced. The Night Gallery launches a new installation on the third Friday of each month. Every new show starts with a gathering along the sidewalk in front of Future Firm to hear comments from the artist. The next opening will be on August 18th, but each ongoing exhibition can be seen every night. The Night Gallery and Future Firm are located at 3149 S. Morgan St. in Bridgeport, Chicago.
Placeholder Alt Text

Edward Cella’s art and architecture gallery opens its new Culver City space in May

Renowned Los Angeles gallery Edward Cella Art and Architecture, which left its six-year home on Wilshire Boulevard last year, is opening its new location on La Cienega Boulevard in Culver City on May 9. The new space, and its graphic identity, are being designed by LA-based Group Effort—a collaboration between Jessica Fleischmann/still room and Rachel Allen Architecture. In both cases they've created a "modern look," said gallery owner Edward Cella, that "plays with the texture and angularity of the building," and gives the gallery a fresh "new start." Cella has also commissioned sheet metal specialist Alex Rasmussen (of Neal Feay Company) to create a striking new aluminum reception made up of weathered, organic plates. The inaugural exhibit will be called UNBOUND, featuring new large format paintings by gallery artists Joshua Aster, Kendell Carter, Mara De Luca, Spencer Lewis, Donnie Molls, Ruth Pastine, Chris Trueman, and Jeffrey Vallance.
Placeholder Alt Text

Brooklyn’s 56 Bogart is at the center of the New York City art world

  If the address 56 Bogart in Brooklyn means nothing to you then you're missing the center of the art world in New York City in 2015. Forget about Chelsea and the Bowery, Bushwick and East Williamsburg are the most exciting exhibition outposts in the city and maybe in the country. It's Soho 40 years ago as any Saturday afternoon stroll along Bogart Street will make clear with its cafes, bars, restaurants and working artists lofts on every block. The 56 Bogart gallery Black and White, for example, was founded in New York in 2002. Its mandate is to cultivate "promising artists in the initial and more advanced phases of their careers." The gallery started in an industrial ground-floor space in Brooklyn and from 2006 to 2010 had two locations—Williamsburg and Chelsea. In 2010 the Chelsea gallery closed and not-for-profit Black & White Project Space was established in Brooklyn. Now after a two-year hiatus, the Project Space is at 56 Bogart Street and the first show in its new space, Henry Khudyakov Final Brain Storm, is a survey of the Russian-born, 85-year-old artist and poet's nearly forty year career in the United States. That's unique and ambitious for a small gallery like Black and White. The gallery is a perfect place to spend a Saturday afternoon.
Placeholder Alt Text

Christopher Mount to Open Architecture and Design Gallery in Los Angeles

Having observed the absence of architecture and design materials from the American art collection scene, curator and scholar Christopher W. Mount decided to fill the gap himself. His eponymous Los Angeles gallery, housed in the Pacific Design Center, opens to the public on Friday, May 23 with A Modern Master: Photographs by Balthazar Korab. A second gallery, open by appointment, will be located on the Upper West Side in New York. “I really thought that this was the time,” said Mount. “I thought, ‘Here is a subject matter that major museums collect, and there hasn’t been somebody who opened a gallery.’” A former curator in the Department of Architecture and Design at MoMA, Mount more recently had a bumpy ride as guest curator of A New Sculpturalism: Contemporary Architecture from Southern California, part of the Getty Research Institute’s Pacific Standard Time series. He describes his new gallery as “a labor of love” and a natural extension of his museum work. “When people talk about what is it you really like to do, the answer [for me] is to find works, put them on the wall...and educate people on architecture and design. Get people to appreciate it as something that is equal in aesthetic pleasure and beauty to regular fine art,” said Mount. The works his gallery will display—including photography, drawings, and, possibly, architecture models—“is often towards another end, but is often beautiful in and of itself.” As for choosing LA as his headquarters, “I think part of the reason to be based in Los Angeles is...[that] the architecture profession is much less strictly commercial,” said Mount. “Certainly these people are wildly successful, but they tend to be more experimental.” At the same time, his work on A New Sculpturalism left Mount with a sense of how disconnected the New York architecture world is from what is happening in Los Angeles. “The idea is to promote this work, promote the designers and the architects, and hopefully we’ll promote it throughout the world,” he said. After the Korab show, which closes August 29, the Christopher W. Mount Gallery will exhibit photographs by architectural photographer Benny Chan. Mount also plans a show featuring drawings by prominent mid-century car designers, timed to coincide with the Los Angeles Auto Show in November.
Placeholder Alt Text

Zaha Hadid Puts her Curvilienear Spin on the Serpentine’s New Sackler Gallery

Architect Zaha Hadid is finally putting her stamp on the city she has called home for over 30 years with one of her signature curvaceous designs. The London-based architect has designed the new Serpentine Sackler Gallery in Kensington Gardens consisting of both a $14.5 million curvilinear extension and the renovation of the The Magazine, a brick building originally built as a Gunpowder Store in the early 19th century. The new tensile addition rolls up and over the historic structure and houses a new 120-seat restaurant and social space. The building is composed of tailored glass-fiber fabric, steel columns, and glass. This project is not only Hadid's first permanent building in London, but it is also her first permanent completed tensile structure to date. "The extension has been designed to complement the calm and solid classical building with a light, transparent, dynamic, and distinctly contemporary space of the 21st century," said Hadid in a statement. The Guardian reported that the firm designed the Serpentine's firm temporary installation in 2000, and then were commissioned to do another one, dubbed Lilas, in 2007 for "The Summer Party" fundraiser. "But what we have here now is absolutely Zaha's concept from day one. And it isn't just about galleries, it was about creating social space, and supporting the parkland setting," said Julia Peyton-Jones, director of the Serpentine, in a story featured in The Independent.
Placeholder Alt Text

Rem Again: OMA Designs a Third Gallery for Lehmann Maupin

Rem Koolhaas and OMA may have grander commissions and more famous clients (Miuccia Prada?), but probably not a more devoted and long lasting partnership than with David Maupin of the Lehmann Maupin Gallery. The gallerist first commissioned Koolhaas to design a new exhibition space on Manhattan's Greene Street in 1995 and again when they moved to 26th Street in Chelsea ten years later (there is non-OMA-designed Lehmann Maupin on the Lower East Side). Now the Lehmann Maupin Gallery has asked OMA to design a third gallery, this time in Hong Kong. On Greene Street Koolhaas gave Lehmann Maupin a simple but stunning design that featured an enormous moving plywood wall that was at once not precious (like Soho at the time) and a classic white box gallery. The Dutch architect carried this same theme over to Lehmann Maupin's Chelsea gallery but with the addition of travertine floors. Now for Lehmann Maupin's latest gallery, in the central, pre-war Pedder Building in Hong Kong, Koolhaas has brought a bit of old Soho "loft" style to Hong Kong. The new gallery space features marine plywood, modern fixtures and minimalist lighting set against the rough existing walls of the Pedder building. The new design features a corner entrance "that obscures the boundary between the interior and exterior" while leaving the two gallery rooms divided by a large sliding plywood wall/partition as in Soho. It's a honest, straight-forward design that "reveals, rather than conceals, the patina that distinguishes the historic building from its more glossy neighbors." The art work in this Hong Kong Image is from the gallery's first show of the Korean artist Lee Bul.