Posts tagged with "Furniture":

On View> Christian Wassmann’s “5 Platonic Objects” in New York City

Architect and designer Christian Wassmann explores the interaction between geometric forms and the space we inhabit in a new exhibit, 5 Platonic Objects, presented at R 20th Century Gallery. The show features five objects—such as a pillow or vase—that are inspired by each of the platonic solids: tetrahedron, hexahedron, octahedron, icosahedron, and dodecahedron. Wassermann, born in Switzerland, opened up his own practice in New York City in 2006. His works runs the gamut from furniture and installations to architecture and interiors, which has included Robert Wilson’s Byrd Hoffman Watermill Foundation, East Village Radio, and an apartment and private showroom for Lisson Gallery. The exhibition is on view March 5th through April 20th.

Designers Reuse Hurricane Debris in Furniture for Reclaim NYC Auction

To benefit the victims of Hurricane Sandy, New York City designers are hosting a furniture auction, selling pieces made from the storm’s reclaimed materials. The silent auction, Reclaim NYC, is organized by AN alumna Jennifer Krichels Gorsche, writer Jean Lin, and designer Brad Ascalon will sell the work of more than twenty artists who have all pledged to donate proceeds to the American Red Cross in Greater New York. The pieces range from tables and chairs to lighting fixtures to art objects. Some designers have even represented themes of the storm and flooding in their work and will continue to include these themes in upcoming work. Reclaim NYC will take place on December 19 from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. at Ligne Roset’s SoHo showroom, located at 155 Wooster Street. Participating Designers as of December 4, 2012:
Lindsey Adelman Brad Ascalon Dror Benshetrit Bittersweets Elodie Blanchard Bec Brittain Kevin Michael Burns Evan Clabots DMFD Joe Doucet Fort Standard Dan Golden Danny Greenfield Stephane Hubert Brian McGowan Kiel Mead Daniel Moyer Brendan Mullins Shannon South Suzanne Tick Uhuru UM Project Alex Valich VOLK Furniture

PRODUCT> Herman Miller’s Special Edition Eames LTR Table

Herman Miller launched their Select Program in 2008 to offer their customers an extra way to connect with the brand and enhance their collections with limited edition pieces. As part of their 2012 program, Herman Miller is offering the Eames Wire Base Low Table (also referred to as the LTR table) in three special colors on sale now until Spring 2013, when production will end. You might be asking yourself what's so special about red, yellow and blue that gives the beloved wire base tables limited edition status. Ray Eames, who many acknowledge for her gift of using color and for her reintroduction of bright color choices into the home, studied under abstract expressionist Hans Hoffman, whose bold blocks of primary colors had a clear influence on her. To celebrate Ray's 100th birthday this year, Herman Miller chose to release the LTR table in her three favorite colors, cobalt blue, red-orange and yellow gold, which she used for the exterior panels of the Case Study House #8 she and Charles designed. Eames fans who can't afford to collect their properties can at least take home a part of their inspiration with the LTR table. And for young furniture collectors just starting out, the LTR is a great place to begin. The Wire Base Low Tables, first introduced in 1950, are veneered in ash, treated with a rich aniline stain with a corresponding powder coated wire base. They're available for $294. HermanMiller_WireBaseTable2

Product> Minuetto: A Side Table That Seats Ten

We've all seen space-saving furniture at work in micro-miniature apartments that demand militant organization and fastidious housekeeping. We ooh and ahh at the bed that's also a sofa that's also a writing desk that folds up and gets tucked away into a narrow panel in the wall. But unless you have an ecclesiastical devotion to sweeping and vacuuming daily, there are very few who are capable of living like that, although many of us have apartments small enough to warrant such behavior. Still, there's another way. MINUETTO_2 We don't love everything in their collection, but overall Milano Smart Living has a surprisingly attractive line of quality, space-saving furniture. If you've been to any of the bigger design shows this year you've probably seen the sofa/bunk bed in action, but we'd like to call your attention to the Minuetto table, which transitions from a thin side table to a full dining table along aluminum rails that allow you to 'stretch' the table long enough to seat ten people comfortably. No, this isn't going to be your daily dining table, but for square footage-deprived city dwellers it's a great option. As someone who jerry-rigged a dinner table for six last Christmas out of plastic crates and a large sheet of sanded and stained plywood, a transitional table like the Minuetto would have been a god send. Dinner went fine, by the way, but I was nervous during the whole meal that one errant, too-firm slice into a plate of winter squash might send the entire contraption to the floor. Milano Smart Living's CEO Gideon Beck touted Minuetto as an example of the company's new line of crafty furniture for close quarters. "What’s most impressive," he said, "is when people actually get to operate the multiple functions and realize how much time, space and headaches this furniture can save them.” You can test it out for yourself at Milano Smart Living's new showroom in the New York Design Center, where they also have their electronically transitioning furniture and lesser known pieces, like the combination pool table/dining table. MINUETTO_3

PRODUCT> M2L brings Thonet’s Gebrüder T 1819 to the US

Ever since Michael Thonet established Gebrüder in 1819, the brand has been at the forefront of mass producing the now iconic bentwood and tubular steel furniture by designers from the Bauhaus era as well as contemporary designers and architects, as well as Thonet himself, of course. Gebrüder is not only one of the oldest modern design brands and manufacturers, it's also one of the few that are still family owned and managed. The 5th generation of Thonet's (Michael's great-great-grandchildren) currently run the company in Germany, but a few days ago they announced their new partnership with M2L to distribute classics like Mart Stam's chrome-plated cantilevered chair and the Vienna coffee house chair that started it all to the US market. Yes, it's a little crazy to think that a brand like Gebrüder hasn't had direct US distribution in its nearly 200 year history, but better late than never. M2L has a thirty year reputation for distributing the quality craftsmanship and time-honored work of designers like Alvo Aalter, Walter Gropius, Eero Aarino as well as contemporary talents, including Patrick Norguet, Norman Foster and Pearson-Lloyd. Here are a few of our favorites from the Gebrüder T 1819 collection. Marcel Breuer's tubular steel desk (S 285). We want these with the matching cantilever chairs with a wood-framed wicker back and seat (S 32) for our office. Christian Lepper and Roland Schmidt's comfortable yet structured ergonomic lounge chair and ottoman (S 850, S 853) in oak-stained molded plywood and black leather. Naoto Fukasawa's solid wood 130 chair (available in oak, beech or stained, with or without arms) is all grown up yet fun and lively, too.

PRODUCT> Rock Chair, by Fredrik Färg for Design House Stockholm

We have lounges, chaises, day beds and a range of other seating options designed for nesting, curling up, reclining and relaxing, yet the rocking chair, that front porch symbol of lazy day languor, has been mostly forgotten by modern design. In fact, Design House Stockholm, the self-described publishing house for contemporary Scandinavian design, noted that "at some time in the 20th century the design development of the rocking chair stopped" altogether. With that in mind, Stockholm-based furniture designer Fredrik Färg created Rock Chair, a rocking chair that "continues the traditional rocking chair's comforting function but in a modern design." Rock Chair is made from five pieces (plus two leather cushions) that are shipped in a flat pack and assembled like puzzle pieces, easily fitting together without the need for any screws or nails. The simplicity is a result of a class assignment Färg had to create a chair using only MDF and a jig saw. Instead of feeling constrained, he made the simplified construction the chair's most expressive feature. Available from Design House Stockholm in black and white with cushions in natural or black.

On View> The American Style: Colonial Revival and the Modern Metropolis

The American Style: Colonial Revival and the Modern Metropolis Museum of the City of New York 1220 Fifth Avenue Through October 30 Following the U.S. Centennial of 1876, architecture in New York City was defined by what was known as “the American style,” a visual language referencing both the nation’s nostalgia for its beginnings and its progressive aspirations. A new exhibition reveals the impact of Colonial Revival on the cityscape through vintage photographs and objects like a 1926 mahogany settee by the Company of Master Craftsmen, whose volutes reflect a resurgence in classicism that is the trademark of the Colonial.  

Is Wright Wrong on Chandigarh?

On March 31, the Wright auction house gingerly dipped into controversy with its sale of 23 lots of office furniture from Chandigarh even as the Indian government launched a belated international campaign to recover the pieces designed by Pierre Jeanneret for the masterwork by cousin Corbusier. The mid-century furnishings, many made of teak, had notoriously been neglected on site, stashed away in storage by officials, or even used as scrap. Since the 1980s, restored pieces have started to show up abroad and attract high prices, as in $54,000 for a pair of chairs. Corbusier biographer and historian, Jean Louis Cohen, called such sales “sad for history” and tantamount to “looting.” In Chicago, the sale attracted an international crowd, but no museums. A pair of upholstered teak chairs from the High Court (estimated $15,000-20,000) sold for a record $104,500.  As for how it felt to court controversy, auctioneer Richard Wright, said “What I hope will come out of all this is that India will take steps in the future to protect these pieces but, even more important, the architecture.”

Series to Examine the Future of American Design

Dan Rubinstein, editor-in-chief of Surface magazine, is curating a series of lectures at the Museum of Arts and Design evaluating the future of American furniture design. Dubbed "The Home Front: American Furniture Now," the five-lecture series begins this Thursday, January 13 as leading furniture retailers present their views on the difficulty selling American design. In March, AN's own executive editor Julie Iovine will lead a roundtable panel called "Drafted" on the importance of American design for architects and designers. Iovine will be discussing American design with Michael Graves, Calvin Tsao, Gisue Hariri, and Jeffrey Burnett to discern their experiences and strategies on design. As MAD says, "Like experienced chefs preferring their ingredients to come from local sources, architects would have the most to gain from a stronger American design scene." Rubinstein recently sat down with Dwell for conversation on the event and the problem of American furniture design. At its heart, the event will be tackling the problem of American design: "The different events cater to picking apart the question of what's wrong with American design. There's something wrong but we don't know what it is. We know there's great design out there and that it exists and those thoughts stem a lot of interesting conversations." Find more info on The Home Front lectures at AN's event Diary:
Jan. 13: In Stock: Why is American Design Such a Hard Sell? Feb. 7: Making It: Challenges facing the American designer Mar. 10: Drafted: The Evolving Role of Architects in Furniture Design Mar: 24: After Class: The First Steps of the American Designer Apr. 21: American Design Club