Posts tagged with "Furniture":

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designjunction + Dwell on Design opens

designjunction + Dwell on Design opened May 13 in Chelsea’s ArtBeam space with nearly 30 design brands and a series of talks, kicking off with an architecture breakfast with AN’s senior editor Matt Shaw with Kai-Uwe Bergmann, partner at BIG Architects. A departure from the architecture-focused keynotes of Dwell on Designs past, this year’s speaker is illustrator Bob Gill (best known for his 1968 cover art for George Harrison’s Wonderwall Music album), who will discuss his experiences of the changing design landscape over the past 65 years. Other speakers throughout the weekend include New York designers such as Sandy Chilewich, Stephanie Goto, David Weeks, and Gregory Buntain of Fort Standard. The loft-style space was filled with international designers both large and small, from heavy hitters like Artek and Muuto to independent designers, such as U.K.–based Melin Tregwynt and Croatian design platform Stufff Concept Store, among many others. WeWork created a pop-up workspace, encouraging visitors to try out the modern office and a cafe by Vitra that also offers places to sit and linger. Some standout wares included British Dyke & Dean’s Spatterware enamelware, lighting company’s Haberdashery stunning Leaf installation, and Stufff’s Ili Ili lamps and Lacescape coffee table. design junction + Dwell on Design will run through May 15, 2016.
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Product>ICFF Preview

This year ICFF and Wanted Design span ten days and two boroughs with events happening 24/7. Here are a few of the pieces from the show that we are excited about seeing up close in person.

Embrace Lounge Chair Carl Hansen & Søn Created by Austrian design trio EOOS, the Embrace Lounge Chair is a more relaxed version of a dining chair by the same name that debuted in 2015. The new version combines Carl Hansen’s classic wood frame with a comfortable upholstered cushion.

Lattice Nanimarquina

Lattice is the second collaboration between Nanimariquina and the Bouroullec brothers. For it, they experimented with the options of ancient kilim techniques to create a pattern that was balanced and proportional, yet also irregular. It comes in two color variations, as well as the option to commission custom pieces.

Pluralis Fritz Hansen

This new meeting table design by Danish designer Kasper Salto is aptly named—it is intended to accommodate a variety of different settings and function as a blank slate for creativity.

New finishes Fantini

Gunmetal, copper bronze, and British gold are three new finish options that Fantini is adding to its collection. These three hues have been trending heavily in kitchen and bath design, and now allow for an even larger range of customization.

Comforty Mellow Maja Ganszyniec

This couch, in addition to dozens of other award-wining ceramics, glassware, clothing, and furniture designs, will be on display at Pole Position, a presentation by Culture.pl on some of the best designs out of Poland.

Vague Stelle chandelier Santa & Cole

To celebrate their 30th anniversary, Barcelona-based lighting brand Santa & Cole is reissuing a fixture that was originally designed by Antoni de Moragas, one of Spain’s preeminent postwar architects. It was inspired by medieval architecture and the designs of Viennese Secessionists Joseph Maria Olbrich and Adolf Loos.

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Konstantin Grcic draws on 15th-century Italian artwork for Kreo Exhibition

German furniture designer Konstantin Grcic has designed five chairs revolving around the spatial dynamics exhibited in St Jerome in his Study, a 1475 painting by Antonello da Messina. His exhibition, called Hieronymus (Greek and Latin for "Jerome"), is currently on display at Galerie Kreo in Paris. When looking at St. Jerome in his Study, it's clear that his specialized space, which he used to translate the Bible into Latin, has been ergonomically refined with precision to his needs. Everything, from the angle of the writing desk to the height and placement of shelving, create easy ergonomic access and allow light to illuminate this desk. St. Jerome, while in his study in 4th Century A.D., was in fact one of the first people to read silently. This perhaps says a lot about the man and the thoughtful design around him. Without getting carried way into deeper analysis, it is the chair and its contextual relationships that ultimately captured Grcic's imagination. In Hieronymus, Grcic aims to embody and amplify this sense of tailored physical intimacy. Each chair comprises different materials that range from fiber cement, aluminum, marble, anodised aluminum, and plastics used for 3-D printing. Despite their open nature, Grcic's chairs convey a sense of privacy, encouraging occupants like St. Jerome to engage in a similar approach to solitude. Each chair achieves this through cuboid cuts, staggered ledges, angular seating, and specific places to rest ones feet. This year, Grcic is also celebrating 25 years of working alongside fellow German furniture design firm ClassiCon. Meanwhile, another exhibition of his chairs, Mingx, is on show at the Salone del Mobile 2016 in Milan. This time, though, Gricic takes influence from ancient furniture design. Hieronymus runs from through to July 14, 2016, at Galerie Kreo, Paris.    
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The next big thing: Emerging designers at Salone Satellite

Perhaps one of the most interesting pavilions at Milan’s Salone del Mobile, Salone Satellite features top new and emerging designers from around the world. Whether it is a “magic” bookshelf, sustainably sourced alpaca furniture, or a light that syncs with your heartbeat, Satellite designers never fail to surprise and delight. Fondue Light by Satsuki Ohata Inspired by cheese (Ohata is a big fan of the stuff), the Fondue light contains a bulb that can be raised and lowered to create different levels of diffused or targeted light. As If From Nowhere by Orla Reynolds Irish designer Orla Reynolds created this modular bookcase for small spaces. A brightly colored table and four chairs tuck neatly among the shelves and can be pulled out as needed. Kinetic BioLab by Scottie Chih-Chieh Huangkinetic from Architect's Newspaper on Vimeo. Kinetic BioLab by Scottie Chih-Chieh Huang Part of the Taiwanese designer’s responsive, biologically-inspired work, this light syncs with your heartbeat when you touch it. Allpaka by Sophia Clark, Galiatea When Clark was traveling through Peru, she learned that although alpaca fur is one of the most luxurious materials in the world, the fibers are so short that cloth made with alpaca is often mixed with other materials—diminishing its quality. In her Allpaka line, the fur runs free with the softest, fluffiest furniture and pillows around. The alpaca hides used for the collection are sourced sustainably from animals that died of natural causes. Sander Lorier, Studio Lorier Lorier’s line of minimal, whimsical products seek to simplify and elevate everyday life. The designs are locally produced in the Netherlands from porcelain, copper, and wood. Fungi Collection by Alcarol At first glance Alcarol’s work may look like a standard glass and wood construction, but up close the resin and petrified wood is anything but. The wood is left raw, creating textural interest across the furniture’s surfaces. Taac by Henry & Co. Using 100 percent recycled, sustainable materials Henry & Co’s Taac module, half bathroom half kitchen is made from hemp, coconut, quartz, electric cables, bamboo, clay, limestone, and a radiating plate.
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Behold the “candy desk,” a secret stash of treats in the U.S. Senate

For those in attendance, the State of the Union can be exhausting. Standing up, sitting down, standing up and clapping politely for hours saps the energy of even the most ardent politicians. If viewers at home see senators sneaking out of the House during tonight's speech, don't worry: those elected officials are probably headed for the Senate's "Candy Desk." The history of the desk is short and sweet: In 1965, Senator George Murphy (R-CA) began stocking Desk 80 with candy for his fellow legislators. According to Architect of the Capitol, "In every Congress since that time, a candy desk [sic] has been located in the back row on the Republican side of the aisle and adjacent to the chamber's most heavily used entrance." The Candy Desk raises some vital questions: are there treats in the replica desk in the Kennedy Institute's replica Senate Chamber? Are they edible? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z1Xery2gOVc During the 114th Congress, Senator Pat Toomey (R-PA) is assigned to Desk 80. In a January 2015 press release (and the video above) Sen. Toomey mused on the responsibilities of the Candy Desk steward:
"The Candy Desk duty is Mounds of responsibility. I campaigned for this assignment on the platform of life, liberty, and the pursuit of Peeps and hope Pennsylvania's treats will sweeten the bitter partisan atmosphere. I plan to stock the Candy Desk with Pennsylvania's finest chocolate and deliciousness to ensure a surplus of sweets. We are home to the best confectioners in the world. Hershey's, of course, is headquartered in Central Pennsylvania. Mars makes Three Musketeers in Elizabethtown. Just Born creates Peeps in Bethlehem. And we are proud of our smaller candy makers too including Asher's in Kulpsville, Wilbur Chocolate in Lititz, Josh Early Chocolates in the Lehigh Valley, and many, many more."
AN reached out to the senator's Washington, D.C. office to find out what candy Sen. Toomy prefers. Bill Jaffee, Toomey's press assistant, stated that the desk is currently stocked with "Kit Kats, Hershey’s almond bars, Peanut Chews, Pennsylvania Dutch chocolate caramels, Milky Way, and Mike n' Ike." In a great show of bipartisan goodwill, Democrats may partake in the snacks, too.
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Dreams bend into furniture with this Inception-style coffee table

The frontier-era drama The Revenant, starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Tom Hardy, may have won best picture at last night’s Golden Globes, but it’s the actors’ 2010 mind-bending film Inception that has inspired some seriously cool (yet questionably practical) furniture. The “Wave City Coffee Table,” created by Cypriot-based designer Stelios Mousarris, emulates the scene from the Christopher Nolan–directed thriller in which Ellen Page’s character Ariadne, a student at the Ecole Speciale d’Architecture in Paris, “messes with the physics” of a dream. The resulting bent cityscape mesmerized audiences around the world—and now around the coffee table. This cantilevering wood and steel table features an urban landscape bending over itself, as depicted in the film. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x9hBWnh_O6A Mousarris, who previously worked for Foster and Partners as a modelmaker and for Duffy London as an assistant designer, created the unusual piece using 3D printing technology. His other work proves just as unique, and includes the “Carpet Sofa,” which can be custom-made with a carpet that fits your individual space, and the “Half Couch,” which is described by Mousarris as balancing on one side “whilst perfectly supporting the human weight on the other side.” The limited-edition table is available for purchase on the designer’s website for €5,000, although you may only be able to afford it in your dreams.
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David Chipperfield’s Classical display cabinets take a cue from the Ionic column

Looking for a tasteful way to show off your collection of iconic postmodern teapots or architect-designed shoes? David Chipperfield may have the answer. Debuting during the London Design Festival, the "Ionic" display cases find the architect comfortably ordering classical bronze columns and ribbed glass panels. The cabinets have been developed for the David Gill Gallery. "David Gill encouraged me to think to create furniture outside of the normal commercial criteria—the furniture industry is interested in methods of production that are economical and where pieces sit within the marketplace—be that a sofa or a coffee table," Chipperfield said in a statement. "With David Gill, we were able to operate outside the conventional commercial furniture system. It was strange, and yet very interesting." The project evokes the fantasy of architects everywhere: the dream client, with little to no restrictions on vision and budget. "I still wanted to make a utilitarian object but didn't see utility as its primary concern—or the economy of means," Chipperfield continued. "I didn't have to worry about how it was made, just to make something beautiful out of beautiful materials, such as casting and bronze; things that normally lie beyond the possibilities of the commercial process and invest the object with a strong physical presence."
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This Daniel Libeskind–designed chair might look sharp, but it’s actually very soft

The indefatigable Daniel Libeskind has designed a chair that might make some think that he's angling for a job to overhaul the USS Enterprise (or perhaps a $97 million earthbound residential replica of it). The faceted-yet-cushy Gemma was shown in prototype form by Moroso at Salone this year; the collection will include a full line of seating options. The piece is upholstered in a fabric whose pattern arguably resembles a far, far away galaxy: Blur, which was designed by Marc Thorpe for Moroso.
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Catch this show of Lina Bo Bardi’s furniture and Roberto Burle Marx’s tapestries before it closes!

Tribeca's R & Company gallery at 82 Franklin Street is highlighting two Brazilian greats: Lina Bo Bardi (1914–1992) and Roberto Burle Marx (1909–1994). But act fast! Furniture by Bo Bardi and tapestries by Burle Marx are on display through the end of this week—the exhibit closes April 30. Lina Bo Bardi is best known for her monumental architecture, such as the sturdy São Paulo Museum of Art or the rugged SESC Pompéia in São Paulo. But her work in this exhibit, Lina Bo Bardi + Roberto Burle Marx, represents a much smaller scale. Furniture designed from the 1950s through the 1980s and executed in wood, metal, and leather show how her Brazilian modern thinking translated to the size of a chair. Designs dually showcase strong geometry and classic Brazilian curves that are a hallmark of her larger built work. In fact, a dining set on view in the exhibit was designed with Marcelo Ferraz and Marcelo Suzuki for the SESC Pompéia. Complementing Bo Bardi's furniture are textiles and totems by Roberto Burle Marx, generally regarded as the father of Brazilian landscape architecture. Playful patterns and geometric shapes are present in a variety of Burle Marx's larger projects such as the iconic Copacabana boardwalk, a modern interpretation of historic Portuguese paving designs; collaborations with Oscar Niemeyer in Brasilia; and private estates throughout the country. Zoom out on these landscape designs and you can see a clear connection between the large-format works and his smaller textiles and tapestries. In addition to landscape architecture, Burle Marx was a trained artist and sculptor with a keen interest in Brazilian folk art, themes that appear in his colorful wooden totems on display in this exhibit. Check out these works for yourself at R & Company in Tribeca through April 30.
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Furniture with its own Mind: Researchers at MIT Create Self-Assembling Chair

Scientists at MIT dream of autonomous assembly lines that are free of machinery, human intervention, or fossil fuel expenditure—and still run 24/7. Researchers at the Self-Assembly Lab recently debuted a chair that assembled itself in a water tank over a period of seven hours. Each of the six component parts is embedded with a magnet and like an enzyme or jigsaw piece, each one has a unique connection point for hooking on to the others, thus dictating the final form. The assembly process, however, is anything but controlled. Fans at the bottom of the tank generate turbulence in the water, jostling the pieces and encouraging a series of trial-and-error collisions which eventually sees complementary pieces latch onto one another. “At close proximity, each piece should easily connect with its corresponding component but never with another one,” Bailey Zuniga, a student who led the research, told Wired. Self-assembly means finding a balance between randomness and control. One ultimate goal is self-repairing infrastructure, but too much leeway could make it very difficult to achieve a desired final form. Before vowing to never shell out another extortionate check for furniture delivery and installation, note that the chair is a mere six inches tall. A human-sized chair is in the pipeline as part of the Fluid Assembly Furniture project led by Skylar Tibbit. At present, the team is amassing quantitative data to better understand material properties and why certain shapes work better than others. “Finding a way to make the pieces more interchangeable would increase the chances of the pieces finding their matches,” said Zuniga. Other recent forays into self-assembling modules is the Aerial Assemblies project, in which 36-inch helium-filled balloons with fiberglass frames self-configure into a structural lattice in mid-air.
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Back in Green: Jean Prouvé furnishings reissued and retooled with a little help from Rem Koolhaas

More than seventy years after their creation, a collection of classic office furniture by Jean Prouvé is being updated and released to the market. Dutch fashion purveyor G-Star, in conjunction with Swiss furniture manufacturer Vitra, have developed "Prouvé Raw," a collection of ten pieces that include chairs, desk and wall lighting, conference tables, and writing desks. And Rem Koolhaas also plays a role in this revival. In 2014, OMA and Koolhaas completed a new headquarters for G-Star. Observing an affinity between the architecture and the Prouvé pieces that was mirrored by the design philosophy of the fashion house, a decision was made to outfit the offices, conference rooms, and canteens of the new building with the seven-decade-old furnishings. In cooperation with the Prouvé family, Vitra adapted the French designer’s furnishings to meet the needs of today’s office. Desks have been modularized, and fitted with concealed runs for cables and pop-up power outlets. The swiveling desk chair has a more stable five-branch base. Teaming up with art directors at G-Star, color and material palettes were created that are true to the aesthetic of both Prouvé and the Dutch company. Several shades of industrial green, and leather and fabric upholstery complement the steel and solid-wood furnishings. The Prouvé Raw collection debuts next month at Salone in Milan.
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Clive Wilkinson Architects Makes a Superdesk

Endless table materializes intra-office connectivity in plywood, MDF, and epoxy.

When Culver City-based Clive Wilkinson Architects (CWA) sat down with representatives of the Barbarian Group to discuss renovating the advertising agency's new 20,000-square-foot office, one word kept coming up: connection. "Before, they were all in offices designed for one person, but crammed five in each, and scattered," recalled associate principal Chester Nielsen. "It was a pain. Bringing everyone into the open, and having them feel like they were all connected was super important." The architects elected to "surgically gut" the leased New York Garment District loft to create a central workspace for between 125-175 employees. To materialize the theme of connection, they zeroed in on the idea of a single work surface, an endless table later christened the Superdesk. With 4,400 square feet of epoxy-coated surface atop a support structure comprising 870 unique laser-cut plywood panels, the Superdesk is a triumph of programmatic creativity. "Building a big table was not an obvious solution," said Nielsen, "but it's a simple one." The Superdesk began as a series of sketches by president Clive Wilkinson. "Upon first impression we got to this squiggly table," said Nielsen. "It worked really well. Honestly, we've just been refining that." The table's undulating surface lifts and lowers, to indicate subtle divisions between departments, and to create arched overpasses above intra-office "cow paths." The grotto-like spaces under the archways double as intimate gathering areas for up to eight people.
  • Fabricator Machineous LLC
  • Designers Clive Wilkinson Architects
  • Location New York, NY
  • Date of Completion 2014
  • Material 2-by-4 lumber, plywood, plate steel, MDF, paint, epoxy
  • Process sketching, physical models, Revit, Rhino, laser cutting, bolting, bonding, painting, continuous epoxy pour
From the sketches, the architects built two physical models—the first rough, the second more refined—before taking the design into Revit and Rhino. There they further fine-tuned the form and prepared it for fabrication by Machineous LLC. "Machineous wanted the project very much; they were a good partner on this," said Nielsen. "We worked back and forth to tweak what we needed to make the table constructible." Machineous laser-cut the component parts, including the plywood ribs that shape the Superdesk's archways, using vintage automotive-industry robots. Machineous flat-packed the cut pieces and shipped them to New York, where the desk was assembled on site. The Superdesk's walls are framed in 2-by-4 lumber faced with plywood; plate steel brackets connect the various wood elements. Machineous bonded the MDF tabletop and painted it a shimmering white to give it the appearance of a single connected surface. The crowning achievement of the fabrication process—and the literal polish on the project—was a continuous epoxy pour, completed by rotating teams over a 24-hour period. Despite the complications inherent to prefabricating and installing a massive piece of furniture on opposite coasts, CWA and Machineous managed to deliver their innovative take on contemporary office culture both on time and within Barbarian Group's tight budget. "Something quite notable from the perspectives of both design and fabrication is that it's the same cost as going to Office Depot" for conventional desks, noted Nielsen. What is more, with plenty of surface area for laptops and the other, increasingly minimal, accoutrements of the modern workplace, and with a data and power track built into its walls, the Superdesk "is very, very flexible," he said. "Unlike a typical office [layout], it can change in a day."