Posts tagged with "France":

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Pictorial> Steven Holl′s New Oceanic Museum in Biarritz

Steven Holl's new Cité de l’Océan et du Surf in Biarritz, France is at once rugged and ethereal. Designed in collaboration with the Brazilian artist Solange Fabiao, the building includes an accessible concave plaza roof covered in cobblestones, pierced by two milky "glass boulders," or pavilions housing a restaurant and a "surfer's kiosk." The boulders offer views out to the ocean, while the plaza directs the eye to the sky above. The museum "explores both surf and sea and their role upon leisure, science, and ecology," according to a statement from the firm. The landscape beyond is scooped out to reflect the building's concave form and create a new gathering place for the city. The museum opens to the public on June 25.
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High Speed Railing in Anaheim

More than 300 architects, planners, and developers had their minds blown and their ambitions frustrated at last week’s California High-Speed Rail TOD Marketplace in Anaheim, produced by the Urban Land Insitute's California District Councils. The mind-blowing part came via France and China. Andreas Heym, director of development for consultants AREP, narrated a tour of French High Speed Rail stations, which connect urban-planning loose ends in many cities, including small villages such as Meuse. China has High Speed Rail on government-controlled steroids. Jeff Heller, partner with Heller Manus Architects, and a member of Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger’s HSR China delegation, noted that Chinese HSR now employs six million people and China recently imported $10 billion of HSR technology to Brazil. The frustrating part: Every other industrialized nation but the U.S. uses high-speed rail (HSR) to propel growth, cut carbon, and avoid airport headaches. “We are being left in the dust in the United States,” said Heller. Still, California is working with $10 billion in jump-start bonds. If the state can remove its many development and funding speed bumps, the placemaking power of HSR stations will be “unlike anything in the American rail transportation experience,” said Gideon Berger, AICP, Fellowship Director, Rose Center for Public Leadership in Land Use Urban Land Institute. Jack Skelley serves on Executive Committee for ULI Los Angeles.

Allah Architecture Causes Controversies Worldwide

It looks like New York isn't the only city with a controversial mosque on the horizon—and in the case of Marseilles, that's quite literally where it's going. Archinect points us to a BBC report about the Grand Mosque, a huge new complex atop one of the city's northern hills. As the video above shows, the complaints are akin to those surrounding the proposed mosque around the corner from the World Trade Center site—concerns about culture, paternalism, terrorism, and community, though in France the concerns are obviously less direct. In a favorable sign for the NYC mosque, the local community board voted against landmarking the former Burlington Coat Factory ahead of a binding review at the commission next Tuesday. The vote is non-binding but tends to carry some wait, though we're curious to see what actually happens, as this should be one of the more interesting commission meetings in recent memory. Do check back for a full report.
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Brad Pitt Thinks This Is A Game

Or a puzzle. At least that's what New York mag said the would-be-architect said to Parade mag this weekend. To be more precise:
Architecture is like play to me. As a boy, you play with Tinkertoys, Lincoln Logs, Legos, and you get interested in how things are made, like cars and drills and all that. Years later you come back around to what interested you as a boy. Now, if I have something that I'm dealing with that's causing me a lot of stress, my mind goes to architecture. I walk around the yard and start thinking about what I need to do to the house structurally. It's similar to puzzles in that way, like a crossword puzzle or anything else I can put my mind into. It's a relief for me.
Obviously, we're not going to take this too seriously or get too offended, given who we're talking about here. But at the same time, this is a guy putting together rather earnest post-Katrina housing and going on tours of Fallingwater for his birthday. How would he feel if, the next time we were down, we decided to go shoot an Academy Award-winning short film?