Posts tagged with "Food Markets":

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Governor Cuomo announces plan for $20 million food hub to support NYS agriculture at Hunts Point

Yesterday Governor Andrew Cuomo served up plans for a food safety program and a new $20 million Greenmarket Regional Food Hub in Hunts Point, the Bronx. The program, New York State Grown & Certified, is a response to spurious "organic" and "natural" food labelling that does more to market food than show the conditions under which it was produced. New York State Grown & Certified will tout farmers who meet state standards for sustainability and food safety, promoting their foodstuffs by brokering relationships between certified farmers and buyers like the city's Department of Education. "You go into a store now, everything has marketing on it that suggests that it is natural or that it is healthy," Cuomo told DNAinfo. "Cage-Free Eggs. Chickens That Roam the Landscape Eggs. Chickens That Have Never Seen a Cage, Happy Chicken Eggs." The state will put $15 million towards the total cost of the 120,000-square-foot food hub, which will include processing facilities and a farmer's market. The state estimates that the project will create 95 permanent jobs and support more than 100 New York State Grown & Certified participants. Empire State Development president, CEO & commissioner Howard Zemsky outlined the benefits of the hub in a press release: “The new Greenmarket Regional Food Hub will not only increase access to fresh, healthy foods in NYC’s underserved neighborhoods, it will create new jobs and provide a great opportunity for our hardworking farmers to distribute local produce and expand their businesses throughout New York State.” While Hunts Point Cooperative Market has always been the center of the region's food distribution system, food is becoming a driver of economic development in the surrounding neighborhoods. Keith Rubenstein’s Somerset Partners announced plans for Bruckner Market, a food hall and beer garden, last month. There are no renderings of the project available at this time.
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Move over, Chelsea: Could the South Bronx become New York’s gourmet market mecca?

Keith Rubenstein's Somerset Partners, the developer behind last year's now-infamous "Bronx is Burning" party, closed yesterday on the $47.5 million sale of a 16,000-square-foot building in Mott Haven that he thinks will become the next Chelsea Market. Rubenstein told The Real Deal that he's been scouting the South Bronx property for a while, as it will complement the residential complex he's building with the Chetrit Group across Bruckner Boulevard. That project, six 25-story residential structures abutting the Harlem River, should break ground in about one month. Depending on your political orientation, the impeding Bruckner Market will have you giddy or gagging. The building, a 1930s warehouse, could enlarge its footprint up to 30,000 square feet to host food kiosks, restaurants, produce vendors, and possibly a microbrewery with a beer garden. Rubenstein estimates that it should be complete in the next 12 to 18 months. This is not the first, or last, food venture planned for the area. To brand the area effectively for potential tenants and investors, Somerset Group has backed a hip coffee shop and an Italian restaurant close to their towers. Others are riding the wave: Acclaimed chef Massimo Bottura announced this week that he's working on a Bronx dining hall with Robert De Niro that serves meals made from leftover ingredients. Just north, Youngwoo & Associates is developing the disused Bronx General Post Office into a mixed-use space with dining options. Will the neighborhood's expanded dining options sate the throngs of museum-goers who will surely flock to Mónica Ponce de León's addition to the Bronx Musuem of Arts, or herald a heretofore unprecedented displacement of local businesses and residents? Or both? At least there will be spaces to ponder the South Bronx's changes over a sandwich.
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New York City’s New Amsterdam Market Will Not Return

After seven years in business, the New Amsterdam Market near New York City’s South Street Seaport is closing up shop. “We held a total 88 markets and numerous innovative celebrations of our region's bounty; supported nearly 500 food entrepreneurs; and contributed to the creation of more than 350 jobs,” Robert LaValva, the market's founder, said in a statement. “However, I was never able to raise the funding or attract the influential backers needed for our organization to thrive.” The news of the market’s closing comes in the midst of an ongoing debate over the Seaport's future, which could include a 50-story residential tower. The fate of that project is not certain, but the developer behind it, the Howard Hughes Corporation, is already demolishing an old shopping mall on the Seaport’s Pier 17 to make way for a glassy, 300,000-square-foot replacement designed by ShoP Architects. According to LaValva, this type of development is to blame for the popular market's demise. He went so far as to call Councilmember Margaret Chin’s support for Howard Hughes' plans a “mortal blow” to the New Amsterdam Market. In a statement issued shortly after LaValva's, the councilmember said she was saddened by the market's closing, but that she was not to blame for it. “I proudly helped secure funding from the City Council and the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation in order to support the New Amsterdam Market. I made sure to provide Mr. LaValva and the New Amsterdam Market with opportunities to formalize his relationship with the City,” she said. “Now, Mr. LaValva is trying to publicly blame me for a situation he could have prevented by working more collaboratively with my office and the City. It might make for an attention-grabbing email blast, but it’s not the truth.” The New Amsterdam’s last market was held on June 21st.
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Sustainable Food and Architecture at Santa Barbara Public Market

London has Borough Market. San Francisco has the Ferry Building. Seattle has Pike Place Market. And now Santa Barbara has the Santa Barbara Public Market. The 19,400 square-foot marketplace, put together by local architecture firms Cearnal Andrulaitis, Sutti Associates, and Sherry & Associates Architects, opened on April 14. It showcases regionally-sourced, artisanal foods in a downtown location. Part of Alma del Pueblo, a mixed-use development that includes additional retail and 37 condominiums, the Public Market is located on the site of a former Vons. “When I bought the land, I knew that I wanted to put a market back,” said developer Marge Cafarelli. “Santa Barbara . . . [has] such rich roots and traditions in agriculture, farming, food, and wine, that it made sense to put something back that made sense in this time. The Public Market is housed in an understated stucco shell, a streamlined take on the Mission Revival architecture for which the city is known. “It was very, very important to me that the building be very simple,” said Cafarelli. “Less can sometimes be more, that was very intentional.” One of the driving forces behind the design was the incorporation of an historic six-panel mosaic mural by Joseph Knowles, which the city of Santa Barbara required Cafarelli to preserve. The mural, which depicts the history of the town, had for decades fronted Victoria Street, the quieter of the two streets adjacent to the Public Market. “[We wanted] to get those panels off of Victoria Street, which will make it much more pedestrian-friendly, and move [them] to Chapala Street, which is much more vehicular oriented,” said Cearnal Andrulaitis’ Jeff Hornbuckle, project architect. Construction crews sawed the 10-ton panels out one at a time and used a crane to move them around the corner, where they were placed atop a freshly-poured concrete footing. Cearnal Andrulaitis designed the shell of the Public Market. Sutti Associates did the overall interior layout and Sherry & Associates Architects worked with the tenants—who include purveyors of coffee, juice, bread, cheese, meat, beer and wine, and gourmet groceries—on kitchen layouts. Though united by an industrial aesthetic, including a polished concrete floor and exposed ductwork, the vendor areas were given unique personalities through custom lighting and signage. Next door to the Public Market are Alma del Pueblo’s Mediterranean-style condominiums, intersected by a series of pathways, pedestrian bridges, and outdoor living rooms. The Arlington Theatre, which dates to the 1930s and features an elaborate Mission Revival facade and an art deco steeple, is adjacent to both the condos and the Public Market. The architects opened up views to the theater, Santa Barbara’s largest, from the Victoria Street side of the complex, including at the main entrance to the condominiums. “The idea was to create a paseo that framed the view of the Arlington,” said Hornbuckle. Cafarelli is aiming for LEED for Homes Platinum on the residential portion of the project and LEED for Core and Shell Gold on the Public Market. “What was important to me was to build something that was really in the vernacular of the historic district, but to create a really high performance building in addition,” she said.
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Uncertainty Shrouds New York’s Plans For a Permanent Food Market at the Seaport

It seems that a proposal to make the New Amsterdam Market a permanent fixture in the South Street Seaport's former Fulton Fish Market building has every food critic and preservationist in New York City revved up, and touting the plan as the next big game-changing development for Lower Manhattan. New York Times opinion and food columnist Mark Bittman went so far as to say that this expansive food market has “wonderful potential that dwarfs even that of the High Line.” Robert LaValva, a former city planner, first launched the market in 2005 after the fish market relocated to the Bronx. He looked around and realized that, unlike a number of cities, New York City didn’t have a large-scale food hall or market. And so he modeled his vision to create a permanent food market in the Tin and New Market buildings after places such as Pikes Market in Seattle, the Ferry Building in San Francisco, or Les Halles in Paris. Today the City Council is holding a public hearing to determine the future of the South Street Seaport. The Howard Hughes Corporation (HHC), the developer that rents Pier 17 next to the Fulton Fish Market, has enlisted SHoP Architects to redesign the struggling 250,000-square-foot mall. The plan calls for new boutiques, restaurants, rooftop shops, a concert venue and museum. But the question remains whether these changes will extend to the Tin and New Market buildings that once housed the old Fulton Fish Market, and is now the temporary weekend home of New Amsterdam Market. Supporters of the food market are concerned that the overhaul of Pier 17 could pave the way for development on the former site of the fish market and have launched an online petition to bolster their cause. HHC, however, hasn’t indicated any plans to raze or rebuild at the site.