Posts tagged with "Fogarty Finger":

Fogarty Finger designs a domestic office for a financial firm in Flatiron

Most of us would prefer to keep our work and home lives separate, but as the line between office and living room continues to blur, the professional world is increasingly trading staid benches for plush couches. New York-based Fogarty Finger, together with Kevin Dumais, have recently completed a top-floor office in Manhattan’s Flatiron district that brings a homey touch to what would otherwise be a sprawling floorplate. 119 Fifth Avenue, smack dab between Union Square and Madison Square Park, might seem like an odd location for a wealth management firm. It’s not Wall Street, but as Fogarty Finger cofounder Robert Finger describes, financial firms are beginning to scout for locations that set them apart from their competitors. In the case of 119 Fifth Ave., the client requested a different type of workplace that would feel more like an extension of his home; he even brought in his own furniture, said Finger. The result, an 8,000-square-foot office for only six employees, uses soffits, residential furniture, and soft natural lighting (the ceilings are high enough for clerestory windows) to avoid feeling cavernous. Taking advantage of the office’s top floor location and soaring ceilings, Fogarty Finger and Dumais highlighted the historic cast iron building’s skylights over the central gathering places by framing them and illuminating them from within at night with installed lights. The building’s original ornate elevator frame and French windows were kept and restored as well. The design elements help further delineate the office’s programming. A more traditional office space adjacent to the reception lounge has been carved out with filing cabinets, cone-shaped overhead lights, and a specialized desk system, and the carpeted floors of the meeting rooms denote the transition from one discrete area to the next. Doors and partitions were specifically arranged to allow views framing the entire length of the floor, and contemporary art was strategically placed throughout to break up the larger spaces.

Fogarty Finger reveals an upscale WeWork for the Brooklyn Navy Yard

As major changes and speculation over what’s next hover around the Brooklyn Navy Yard, S9 Architecture’s Dock 72 office tower is nearing completion. The stepped, 16-story building is currently receiving its facade, and co-working company WeWork has already laid claim to 220,000 square feet of office space. With so much ground-up space to work with, the company (and developers Boston Properties and Rudin Development) has tapped local firm Fogarty Finger to design the amenity spaces for their new digs Fogarty Finger took cues from residential and hospitality design to impart a softness throughout, which, given their track record in designing high-end office spaces, is why the studio was chosen for the job. From the renderings, it seems the interiors are a step up from WeWork’s typical glass-and-reclaimed-wood look, usually handled by their in-house design team (Bjarke Ingels had no role in the project, either). Dock 72 is the first ground-up office building to be built in Brooklyn in nearly 30 years, and given the building’s Class A ratings (the highest office standard) and waterfront views, Fogarty Finger was responsible for designing 35,000 square feet of high-end amenities. Two bar-and-lounges, one on the ground floor, the other adjacent to the 16th floor’s conference center, a 600-foot-long, 30-foot-wide lobby that runs the length of the building, a juice bar, spa, gym, café, and a market. The interiors lean heavily on an industrial aesthetic (concrete floors, black steel columns), with strategic splashes of warm wood paneling along the ceiling and a white oak trim in the furniture. In keeping with the Navy Yard's effort to bolster New York City's manufacturing base, local manufacturers from the yard were invited to curate the public areas. As founding partner Robert Finger describes it, Dock 72 is only the latest project to escalate the included amenities as developers try to capture Class A office space tenants; high-value tech employees in this case. Once the next phase of the Navy Yard’s expansion is complete, Dock 72 will link up with a suite of planned waterfront amenities surrounding the office core.

Fogarty Finger unveils 22-story tower next to historic Dimes Bank in Brooklyn

New York–based architecture firm Fogarty Finger along with developers Charney Construction & Development, 1 Oak Contracting, and Tavros Capital Partners, unveiled its latest project: a new 22-story mixed-use tower integrated with the historic Dimes Saving Bank of Williamsburg in South Williamsburg, Brooklyn. The site, nicknamed “The Dime,” involves a 342,451-square-foot building at 263 South 5th Street, with over 100,000 square feet dedicated solely to office space, 50,000 square feet of retail, and 177 rental apartments. The project is aimed towards the increasing number of office tenants in the area and features an open-plan space with large floor plates. The building's streamlined aesthetic with ribbon windows and rounded corners is a nod to art moderne architecture, particularly Frank Lloyd Wright’s Johnson Wax building and New York’s Starrett–Light building, according to the architects. The facade will be clad in white terra cotta tiles in reference to the neo-classical bank, which will also be undergoing a renovation. “It was tying back to the bank building, but the idea that the bank building and what we were using for the new building are materials that were used at the same time,” Chris Fogarty, a partner at Fogarty Finger, said to Commercial Observer. The restoration of the 16,700-square-foot bank will involve revitalizing existing columns and maximizing natural lighting by replacing the current skylight. The plan is to let the old Dime bank become a flexible commercial area, with spaces for a showroom, an office lobby for tenants, or stand-alone retail. The project’s strategic location, which is close to the Marcy Avenue J/M/Z stop, offers commuters a solution to the upcoming L train shutdown, according to the architects. “The Dime building will create the perfect gateway to Brooklyn, welcoming inhabitants at the crossroads of the bridge, the BQE, and the elevated train tracks, creating an iconographic project that merges the past and future of the city,” the firm said in a press release. Construction is expected to begin in June 2017 and finish by 2019.