Posts tagged with "Florida":

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Design Miami Minute> Larry Bell and Hans Ulrich Obrist together in Wynwood

miamiday2-01 One of the early highlights of Miami Art and Design Week is the spectacular Larry Bell sculpture 6X6 An Improvisation at White Cube Gallery’s pop up space in the Wynwood Art District. Last night, Bell was interviewed by uber questioner Hans Ulrich Obrist in the gallery next to the piece. Bell talked about his years learning to manufacture and laminate his art pieces on East 9th Street in New York City after Pace Gallery sold out his show before he even arrived at the gallery. He also described his early years as a painter (he started out studying graphic design) influenced by Willem De Kooning, which eventually had him make spaces of wood and glasses rather than paint them. Bell described the nearly unlimited spatial and geometric possibilities of his glass cubes. When Obrist, who always wants to be prepared for his interviews, asked Bell to consider his installations as collages, referencing Vladimir Tatlin and others. Bell did not seem to want think about his work as Obrist farmed it and blurted out, “Hans and I only met for a few minutes before this talk,” and "I don’t know what to say about the work!"
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Tell us what excites you about this year’s Design Miami

The Architect’s Newspaper will be in Miami this week for a slew of art and design events including Art Basel, Unbuilt, Design Miami, the Salone del Mobile preview, and launches of the new Institute of Contemporary Art and limited edition Ducati motorcycle. We have received a huge digital and paper file of official press releases but there may be scattered events and launches that have not landed on our desk. Is there anything the AN audience should know about on the edges of the official events? What are we missing? Let us know here in the comments below or tell us about your design highlights of the week!
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Rudolph’s Walker Guest House replicated at the Ringling Museum of Art

It's no Palace of Versailles, but the Sarasota Architectural Foundation (SAF) has reproduced Paul Rudolph's 1952 Walker Guest House on the grounds of the Ringling Museum of Art. Using Rudolph's plans and Ezra Stoller's interior photographs, the foundation commissioned a faithful replica, down to the magazines on the coffee table. The replica will cost SAF approximately $150,000. It will be faithful to the original, minus the bathroom, which will be supplanted by a wheelchair-accessible ramp. The house will welcome visitors starting November 6th, part of opening festivities for SAF's SarasotaMOD Weekend. The original Walker Guest House is a 24-foot-by-24-foot foot structure constructed from "off the shelf" materials for the Walker family on Sanibel Island, off the Gulf Coast. The house still stands. Why build a replica? As SAF board member Dan Snyder explained, unlike other cities tearing Rudolph's architecture down, Sarasota is a "city that loves Rudolph." The Walker Guest House is privately owned, and Sanibel Island is only accessible via boat. The Ringling has 250,000 annual visitors, so having the replica house on its grounds will introduce Rudolph's work, and the Sarasota School of Architecture, to a wider audience. Indigenous to Florida's west coast, the Sarasota School melded the international style with the organic school of Frank Lloyd Wright while responding to the demands of a subtropical climate. The Walker Guest house, Snyder noted, "blurs the distinction between inside and outside, stealing space from the outside so the house seems much larger." The house is calibrated to respond to the seasons. Its three, eight-foot-by-eight-foot panels are flanked by retractable exterior shades that shield the house from excessive summer sun, but allow light to penetrate in the winter, when the temperature drops into the 60s. Its exoskeleton functions as a wraparound porch and a support system for the pulleys, weighted with red concrete balls, that control the shades. Members of the SAF visited the original house to document the interior and exterior for the replica project. To many, "1950s Florida" means tacky pastels and a flock of lawn flamingos. In contrast (or perhaps in protest), Rudolph's interior color palette is subdued grey to "draw [your] eye to the outside," Snyder explained. Referencing Stoller's photographs, the Rudolph-designed coffee table, dining table, bookcase, and sofa were reproduced. Queens-based furniture designer Richard Wrightman was commissioned to recreate the living room's officer's chairs. Adhering strictly to their standards of authenticity, the team purchased Time, Fortune, and Playboy magazines from 1953, and placed them as they appear in Stoller's images. A parallel exhibition, Paul Rudolph: The Guest Houses, at the Ringling features photographs, models, drawings, and writings. The exhibition runs through December 6th.
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Donald Trump commissioned this rare albino Michael Graves building

Driving through Miami Beach on Florida’s A1A highway, one cannot help but notice the particular brand of American beach culture passing by—an eclectic architectural mix of decades-old spring break destinations, vintage art deco buildings, and glossy new condo developments. A one-mile stretch of Miami Beach, for example, contains 14 mid-century structures including five of Morris Lapidus’s flamboyant resorts, while the blocks between 32nd and 36th streets are home to a burgeoning $1 billion arts, cultural, and residential development involving Foster + Partners, OMA, and Philippe Starck.   If you manage to escape this commotion and continue north, you will hit Fort Lauderdale. Here—just 23 miles up the road, but in a comparatively calmer setting—is one of Michael Graves’s last built works: a nautically inspired, ocean liner-like structure known today as the Ocean Resort Residences. The project was initially developed as the Trump International Hotel & Tower Fort Lauderdale, but development halted during the 2008 financial crisis. The building fell under foreclosure about six months from its scheduled opening. Graves’s office pulled out of the project and the building sat vacant for four years until CFLB Group purchased it with plans to develop it into a Conrad, Hilton's luxury brand. Many groups have had a hand in the shaping and repositioning of this building, overlaying their own political agendas and recasting narratives that freshen up the experience for today’s evolving luxury market. Prior to reselling the property, the bank repainted Graves’ contextual pastel sky blue and sandy beach tan scheme a stark modern white, presumably to make the building more marketable to luxury condo buyers. After acquiring the building, Conrad spent the next two years completely reimagining Graves’ interiors. The project is now in its third interior design scheme and is finally nearing completion. Conrad’s revamped interiors pair Graves’ nautical inspiration for the exterior with thematic yacht-like detailing through custom material selections and furnishings like teak wood paneling, leather trim, and furnishings such as modified marine table lifts re-contextualized into dining room tables. Today, as the Ocean Resort Residences are set to open to the public, we are reminded of Graves’s associations with Le Corbusier and the New York Five. Whether intentional or not, the Ocean has brought Michael Graves’s career full circle. We owe this to the unlikeliest of sources: the foreclosure bank that left its mark on the building by painting it white. Michael Graves’s career began with his participation in the New York Five, a group of architects nicknamed “The Whites” by the press primarily because their work resembled more neutral white abstract forms. The projects of the Whites were a series of built houses which borrowed largely from early Corbusian-inspired form. Despite the nickname, the Whites held a very strong interest in the use of color in the work of Michael Graves and John Hejduk. In fact, Graves had claimed in interviews that his early houses were intended to be colored but that his clients rejected such schemes in favor of all white exteriors. Graves’s career evolved beyond the New York Five era, adopting an architectural language aligned with a commercial populism: design for the masses centered around colorful and legible, yet abstracted, classical forms. The story here is ultimately not about Graves’ contribution to the architectural scene along the A1A, nor the fact that this building is one of the last that he ever designed. Rather, it is about a disciplinary question of legacy, authorship, and narrative. Would it be correct to call the 2015 posthumous Conrad version of this building a Michael Graves project, or should we avert our eyes, referring instead only to sketches and a few marketing photos of the incomplete Trump version which no longer exists? Graves’s contribution here is not a tangible building, but rather a narrative about contextualism. In the end, what we are left with is a sail-like gridded white facade, and a thematized luxurious interior loaded with a fresh new amenities package that perhaps even Le Corbusier would enjoy.
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Critic Alastair Gordon diagnoses Miami with a case of “facade-ism”

Miami is a place of sunshine and gloss, bronzed bodies and signature cocktails. But for architecture critic and author Alastair Gordon, the underlying dynamics—including the harsh realities of income inequality and rising sea levels—are what make the city truly interesting. These dynamics are further obscured by the recent construction boom. "There are these crazy investments from overseas," said Gordon. "A lot is coming from South America, but also Europe, China, and Russia. That's fascinating, but it's completely in denial of what else is happening in Miami." Architecture can play a role in bridging the gap between the real and the ideal, said Gordon, pointing to Herzog & de Meuron's Pérez Art Museum Miami (PAMM) as a prime example. Gordon will be on site at the museum on Friday, September 11, leading a tour of the Faena District, Miami Beach, and the Design District on the second day of the Facades+ Miami conference. "PAMM is great architecture and a great museum, but it's also a great piece of urbanism," said Gordon. "It shows you what the rest of the city could be" through its relationship to a proposed bike bath and water taxi system. "It suggests a whole new paradigm not just for how a museum operates, but for the city," concluded Gordon. On Thursday, September 10, Gordon will moderate a panel discussion on "Miami: Buoyant City" as part of the Facades+ Miami symposium. Panelists include Zaha Hadid Architects' Chris Lépine, Ximena Caminos of the Faena Group, and Glavovic Studio's Margi Nothard. The three speakers each represent a different approach to facades, said Gordon. Zaha Hadid's 1000 Museum is more about "the building as pure facade, very high end," he said. "That building, more than any of them, is really state of the art in terms of structural integrity." Then there's the Faena District, which Gordon characterized as a "compromise, trying to do architecture with community involvement." Caminos, he explained "is the brains behind the cultural immersion they do. It's not just fancy architects parachuting into Miami. They really live here, they're extremely involved in community affairs." As for Nothard, Gordon says he is "a fan" of her work. "She has done extraordinary things with building affordable housing and senior housing on a level you can't believe." Gordon finds the topic of facades especially fitting for Miami. "It's always been a city of facade-ism," he said. "It's so much about appearance; people don't want to know what's going on behind the facade." But as the work of his co-panelists demonstrates, Miami's reputation for superficiality may be on the brink of a transformation, said Gordon. "In that way the city's changing in a really good way." To hear more from Gordon and his co-panelists, and to sign up for an exclusive field trip to the Faena District, Miami Beach, and the Design District, visit the Facades+ Miami website.
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Developer Andrew Frey on aesthetics versus urbanism in Miami’s building codes

When it comes to navigating Miami’s zoning codes, Tecela principal Andrew Frey brings an experience-based advantage to the table. Before transitioning to the business side of development in early 2011, he spent six years as a zoning lawyer. “I always wanted to be a developer, and I learned a lot from my developer clients,” recalled Frey. Frey will moderate a panel on “Creative Facade Solutions: Responses to Local Zoning” at next week’s Facades+ Miami conference. Panelists include Arquitectonica founder Bernardo Fort Brescia; Carlos Rosso, president of The Related Group’s condominium division; City of Miami commissioner Marc Sarnoff; and Shulman + Associates founding principal Allan Shulman. From the perspective of the Miami-area developer, said Frey, the two most important factors in facade design and fabrication are moisture penetration and attractiveness. As an example, he pointed to an apartment building project in Coral Gables, completed while Frey was with his previous employer. To tackle the moisture issue, the development team paid special attention to the window assemblies, and to any areas where water could penetrate the stucco. On the aesthetic side, they worked within the city of Coral Gables’ incentives for Mediterranean architecture to design a complicated envelope articulated to break up the plane of the front wall. In general, observed Frey, the facade is “extremely important” in an urban environment. For an attached product, in particular, “it’s the only differentiation that the building will have, because you don’t see the sides or back,” he said. “Townhouses, row houses, brownstones—for that kind of a building, the facade is all it has.” With respect to how Miami building regulations impact envelope design and construction, Frey mentioned two potential problem areas. The first concerns Miami-Dade County’s hurricane code, which requires special approval for every product used. “The state of Florida and national building codes don’t count, so you’re somewhat limited in your choices,” he said. Frey cited Frank Gehry’s New World Center as a case in point. “When going through conceptual approval, they were proposing a very minimally supported glass wall,” he said. “What they wound up being able to build had very thick structural members.” (Frey acknowledged that other factors, including cost, may have led to the change in design.) Second, and more troublesome for Frey, is the subjective design review process. From his point of view, the existence of stringent design standards without an underlying commitment to fine-grained urban development reflects a confusion of priorities. “A lot of jurisdictions want to put in place very complicated facade design guidelines, but what they really need to do is to make small-scale urbanism developable,” explained Frey. “If your zoning just encourages super tall towers where the ground floor is an afterthought, of course you’re going to get monotonous, throwaway lower facades.” Hear more from Frey, his co-panelists, and other leading voices in facades design and fabrication at Facades+ Miami. Learn more and register today on the conference website.
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The Facades+ conference digs into Miami architecture this September

Facades+, the premier conference on high performance building envelopes, stands out as an exception to the rule of generic meet-and-greets. The series delivers targeted information on and stimulates dialogue about specific, location-based issues in the fields of facade design, engineering, and fabrication. Facades+ attracts leading industry experts and sponsors for symposia and experiential activities, including workshops and/or field trips. This September, Facades+ makes its South Florida debut with Facades+ Miami. The conference kicks off September 10 with breakfast and check-in, followed by a welcome from co-chairs William Menking, AN's Editor-in-Chief, and John Stuart, Associate Dean for Cultural and Community Engagement at FIU College of Architecture. Between keynote addresses by Rojkind Arquitectos' Michel Rojkind ("Habitable Facade/Tactical Necessity) and Oppenheim Architecture + Design's Chad Oppenheim ("Harmonizing Facades to the Environment"), attendees will hear from speakers and panels on topics ranging from "Creative Facade Solutions: Responses to Local Zoning" to "Miami's Next Steps." Presenters include Vincent J. DeSimone, Founder/Chairman at DeSimone Consulting Engineers; Tecela Principal Andrew Frey; architecture critic and author Alastair Gordon; AIA Miami + Miami Center for Architecture & Design's Cheryl H. Jacobs; Rodolphe el-Khoury, Dean of the University of Miami School of Architecture; FIU College of Architecture's Marilys Nepomechie; Shulman + Associates Founding Principal Allan Shulman; and many more. In addition to earning 8 AIA HSW CEUs for attending the symposium, conference participants can register for one of two exclusive field trips (4 AIA HSW CEUs) on September 11. Both field trips depart from the new Pérez Art Museum Miami. The Downtown and Brickell tour, led by Allan Shulman, is sold out. The second field trip is led by Alastair Gordon and focuses on Miami Beach and the Design District, including the massive mixed-use Faena District. Faena District highlights include the Rem Koolhaas/OMA-designed Faena Forum and Foster + Partners' Faena House. The tour will also make stops at or drive by new and retrofitted Miami Beach resorts as well as high-end retail destinations in the Design District designed by David Chipperfield, Sou Fujimoto, and René Gonzalez. Register today for Facades+ Miami, a one-of-a-kind chance to dig deep into the triumphs and tribulations of designing and building facades for South Florida and beyond.
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More on Miami’s remarkable growth from architect Allan Shulman

When it comes to development, said Allan Shulman, principal of Miami-based Shulman + Associates, "Miami has always been a true 'boom and bust' city, with the cycles highly compressed in comparison to other North American cities." In that sense, then, today's construction extravaganza is just another iteration of a familiar pattern. One thing that is different, however, is that the current trend in South Florida development favors urban over suburban growth patterns. "Miami is filling in and densifying in a continuous arc from Brickell up to Edgewater, and along major road and water arteries toward the west," noted Shulman. "Urban life will be better and more connected in the urban core." Next month, Shulman will lead an exclusive field trip through two local development hot spots—downtown Miami and the Brickell Corridor—as part of the Facades+ Miami conference. "The downtown core is in the midst of a renaissance," he explained. "It has had a kind of low-key vibrancy in the 20 years I've lived in Miami, typically extremely busy during the day and quiet at night." That has begun to change recently with the opening of new restaurants, cafes, grocery stores, creative offices, and cultural destinations including the Miami Center for Architecture + Design. "There is great building stock downtown, and it's fantastic that many buildings are finding new lives with new uses," said Shulman. The pace of growth in the Brickell area is even more remarkable. "Between megaprojects like Brickell City Centre and the crowd of towers rising to the south, it's just exploded," said Shulman. "It seems that most open or underutilized lots are in some phase of development." Much of the new construction, he observed, includes a residential focus. And because both downtown and Brickell offer easy access to rail transit, "it will be interesting to see if this transit-oriented development sets new patterns for the rest of the city," he said. As is often the case, Miami's present building boom benefits some segments of the local population more than others. "There is little development in the middle-tier market, and for affordable housing," said Shulman. "We still haven't broken through significantly to housing types other than single family homes and high-rise towers. It's a mixed story." Yet he remains optimistic about the overall picture. "Miami continues to be a vibrant urban and architectural laboratory," he said. "Developers and architects take risks, and there seems to be a positive reception in the market." In addition, "Miami has been bullish on infrastructure lately," observed Schulman, with new rail extensions to the airport, and a second multimodal central station being built downtown. "Add to this the new port tunnel, museums, park improvements, river and bay walks, and we are starting to build a more robust civic realm," he said. "Way more needs to be done, but the trend has been positive." Join the conversation about present and future development in Miami and beyond at Facades+ Miami September 10–11. See a complete symposium agenda and sign up for a field trip on the conference website. *Seats to both tours are extremely limited—get your tickets today!
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Vincent J. DeSimone explains the importance of wind tunnel testing to facade engineering

In South Florida, where hurricane "season" occupies a full six months of the calendar, AEC industry professionals are especially attuned to the challenge of designing for high winds. Vincent J. DeSimone, chairman of DeSimone Consulting Engineers, has been there—and knows just where to look for answers. "The most useful tool that structural engineers have to determine the forces on the building skin is wind tunnel testing and the ensuing results," said DeSimone, who will deliver a talk on "Innovative Facade and Building Design Through Modern Wind Tunnel Engineering" at September's Facades+ Miami conference. During a wind tunnel test, explained DeSimone, engineers place a scale model of a building inside a tunnel, then vary the wind speed and direction to determine the pressures on the structure. Sensors detect these pressures, which are then translated into forces acting on the facade. Forces on the facade vary from low to high, he noted, and some "hot spots" on the building envelope can achieve local forces in excess of 200 pounds per square foot. The load for the structure as a whole are generally determined by average these minimum and maximum forces. Per the applicable building codes, Miami-area structural engineers base the wind forces used in wind tunnel strength tests on maximum wind forces for a 50 year wind cycle. Building movement is another matter, said DeSimone. For architects and builders in Miami, the allowable lateral displacement—the height of the floor divided by 360—is determined using a 25 year wind cycle. In a building with a story height of 12 feet, in other words, the allowable movement is 0.4 inches. "In seismic zones where movement is expected to be much higher during a seismic event, facades are allowed to be much more flexible," observed DeSimone. "Knowing that facades do not determine the allowable movement of a structure, doesn't it stand to reason that here in Miami we are designing buildings much stiffer than they need to be?" Recalculating allowable movement according to a 10 year wind cycle, for instance, could reduce the building's shear walls by 22 percent. "This reduction—which, by the way, is used all over the country—results in a true sustainable reduction in material," he said. "Remember, the most sustainable building is the building you don't build and, conversely, the building which uses the least material." Learn more from DeSimone and other experts in high performance envelope design and fabrication at Facades+ Miami September 10–11.
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Arquitectonica’s newly opened zig-zagging tower in Miami is meant to reflect the rippling waters of Biscayne Bay

Miami-based Arquitectonica has completed a zig-zagging tower on booming Miami's Biscayne Bay. The 42-story, luxury residence building was developed by the Related Group and has been dubbed the Icon Bay. Icon Bay's distinctive textured facade is created through a playful repetition of the structure's balconies and is said to have been a response to the untamed ripples of the Biscayne's waters as they flutter against the breeze. These elevated terraces provide for sweeping waterfront views. The tower includes its own bayside park, also designed by Arquitectonica. The park's circular walkways move through an outdoor art exhibition space. Icon Bay is but one of the many new construction projects that have recently found its way to Miami's shores.
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Mark Sexton on Designing a High Performance Facade for the FBI

For Krueck+Sexton Architects, determining the essential design character of the new FBI South Florida Headquarters was a no-brainer. Given the 375,000-square-foot building's location among 20 acres of restored wetlands, "Our quest, first of all, was to develop high performance in a transparent facade," said founding principal Mark P. Sexton, who will deliver a talk on the project at next month's Facades+ Miami conference. "If you're working in the Everglades, the idea of your workspace being as transparent as possible [is obvious]." But transparency comes with a couple of challenges, namely solar gain and glare. In order to preserve views while maintaining alignment with the Government Services Administration's 2030 Zero Environmental Footprint project goal, the architects relied primarily on two technologies: frit glass and integrated sunshades. Of course, building orientation was also key; Krueck+Sexton positioned the double-bar plan so that the major facades face south and north, the minor facades east and west. To tackle the potential for thermal gain associated with floor-to-ceiling glass, Krueck+Sexton started with a product with a low-e coating. Next, they added a graduated frit that is heavier at floor and ceiling but more open at the vision plane. But even with the frit, said Sexton, "there was still too much glare on the south side of the building compared to the north side. It's one of the issues of high performance. You can control solar heat gain with these coatings, but then the glare becomes the big problem." When one side of an office is flooded with natural sunlight, he explained, the occupants on the darker side tend to compensate with artificial lighting—thus negating the environmental benefits of all of that daylight. The architects also developed a system of sunscreens that cut back on both direct sun and glare on the south facade. "It became, in a way, eyebrows for the building," said Sexton. He compared the shades to a tuned airfoil on an airplane or high-end automobile: "The performance is enhanced by the additive nature" of the shade. The result is a dynamic envelope with sunshades appearing as geometric mesh interwoven among the intersecting planes of glass. Hear more about the FBI South Florida Headquarters project September 10-11 at the Facades+ Miami conference. Register today and sign up for an exclusive Miami-area field trip on the conference website.
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Architect Chad Oppenheim on Getting Back in Touch With Nature

Asked about the pros and cons of practicing architecture in South Florida, Miami-based Oppenheim Architecture + Design principal and lead designer Chad Oppenheim said, "It's always wonderful to design buildings in a beautiful environment such as Miami." He mentioned specifically the city's connection to nature, and the extent to which the surrounding water, sky, and vegetation provide inspiration. "I think that people come to Miami to enhance their lives, and as a firm it's always been our mission to design buildings and homes to help people achieve just that." But while the landscape and the spirit of the people inhabiting it act as positive stimuli, other regional characteristics are cause for concern. "Typically, I find that Miami is a place where it is expensive to build for what you get," observed Oppenheim, who will deliver the afternoon keynote at September's Facades+ Miami conference. "There is a quality issue that is hard to work around in Miami." The challenge is especially apparent when he compares his South Florida experience to his firm's Switzerland office. "While the building and construction costs may be the same price [in Europe], the quality is a lot better. There's a tremendous passion for craft and quality there that somehow is not necessarily a mission for people here in Miami." At the same time, Oppenheim is heartened by the recent arrival of international design talent on the local architecture scene. "In terms of improvement, as the city becomes more sophisticated and more mature, there's a greater desire for incredible architecture, amazing buildings, and quality projects," he said. As for Oppenheim Architecture + Design's approach to facades, explained Oppenheim, "It's not just about decoration, but how the building's skin can accomplish a goal." In particular, he noted the way in which an overdependence on air conditioning manifests in a one-size-fits-all relationship to the surrounding elements. "We believe that there might be a way to get more connected to the environment, and also do it in a way that's interesting architecturally." Oppenheim cited his firm's recently-completed Net Metropolis in Manila. "The facade includes a combination of sun shading and a high performance insulated glass window wall that minimizes incident solar heat gain and optimizes natural light, while giving occupants a panoramic view of the surrounding city," he said. The green envelope cuts down on the cost and energy consumption associated with air conditioning. "It's a way of dealing with design for the elements, doing it in a more low-tech way," concluded Oppenheim. Connecting the Philippines example back to his home city, he said, "We see a lot of buildings in Miami from before air conditioning was so prevalent featuring screens that become part of the architecture. It's really nice to see those kinds of things and how beautiful and appropriate they are to the climate." To meet Oppenheim and hear more about his take on high performance building envelopes, register for Facades+ Miami today. See a list of symposium speakers and exclusive field trip options on the conference website.