Posts tagged with "Flordia":

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2016 Best of Design Award for Unbuilt > In the Drawers: University of Miami Student Housing Master Plan, Phase 1

The Architect’s Newspaper (AN)’s inaugural 2013 Best of Design Awards featured six categories. Since then, it’s grown to 26 exciting categoriesAs in years past, jury members (Erik Verboon, Claire Weisz, Karen Stonely, Christopher Leong, Adrianne Weremchuk, and AN’s Matt Shaw) were picked for their expertise and high regard in the design community. They based their judgments on evidence of innovation, creative use of new technology, sustainability, strength of presentation, and, most importantly, great design. We want to thank everyone for their continued support and eagerness to submit their work to the Best of Design Awards. We are already looking forward to growing next year’s coverage for you. 2016 Best of Design Award for Unbuilt > In the Drawers: University of Miami Student Housing Master Plan, Phase 1 Architect: CO Architects Location: Coral Gables, FL

Using the home as the building block, CO Architects’ scheme for the University of Miami transforms the notion of dormitory life: Presenting multiple scales of social environments, each three-story home juxtaposes private with semi-private elements. Larger units lift from the ground to allow for passageways and program spaces beneath.

Honorable Mention, Unbuilt > In the Drawers: LaGuardia Airport Master Plan

Architect: SHoP Architects Location: Queens, NY

Selected as a finalist for the 2014 Master Plan Design Competition launched by Governor Andrew Cuomo and Vice President Joe Biden, the proposal responds to LaGuardia’s history of delays due to tarmac crowding by creating a two-island concourse that improves operations, offers a unified environment, and creates an appropriate gateway to New York City.

Honorable Mention, Unbuilt > In the Drawers: WWI Memorial: Path of the Americans

Architect: DXA studio Location: Washington, D.C.

Shining like stars, 116,516 points of light beaming from concrete walls, at once shed light on the memory of Americans lost in World War I and—alongside a central reflecting pool—serve as a metaphor for healing, resilience, and recovery.

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Celebration, FL is ruined by mold and shoddy construction, residents say

Homeowners in one of the most contemporary utopias have little to celebrate these days. Although the Walt Disney Company hired a cadre of leading architects to design Celebration, Florida, the shoddy construction of homes in the theme town is driving residents to grief and financial trouble. The pastoral New Urbanist settlement populated with buildings by Michael GravesRobert A.M. Stern, Charles MooreRobert Venturi, and Denise Scott Brown opened in 1996, but Disney sold the town to New York–based private equity firm Lexin Capital 12 years ago. The 10,000-person town that was supposed to be a halcyon replica of Main Street, U.S.A. now looks like a shantytown, some residents say. Some roofs of Celebration's 105 condos and 4,000 single-family homes are shrouded in tarps to forestall leaks, while balconies, separated from buildings and supported by temporary beams, are completely unusable. Mold creeps up the insides of nylon-lined walls, a disastrous, moisture-trapping material choice for the Florida climate. Conditions are so bad that the condo owners' association filed a civil suit this spring against the property owners that asks for $15 to $20 million in repairs. Residents say that despite the allure of Celebration's compact layout and the imprimatur of famous architects, the buildings' lack of structural integrity makes it difficult to sell homes. “The town does have wear and tear. I’m not going to dispute that,” Metin Negrin, president of Lexin Capital, said to the Wall Street Journal. “If you think I’m enjoying this you’re wrong.” He says that the owners' association failed to pay its dues to finance maintenance and that the group expects his company to pay for the repairs instead. “They’re harassing my team every day. They’re cursing them,” he said. “It’s easy to ask for everything new when you’re not paying for it.” Negrin estimates that repairs could cost close to $5 million, a figure that includes $1 million already spent on repairs. Although Disney no longer maintains the town, the company still exercises control over the styles of architectural elements and facade treatments, and residents are calling for the company to intervene.
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Two groups renew the effort to save the all-concrete Miami Marine Stadium

Can decay on the Bay be forestalled? In 2014, a local group floated the idea of murals, and now, two nonprofits, the National Trust for Historic Preservation and Dade Heritage Trust, are renewing efforts to restore the Miami Marine Stadium on Biscayne Bay. Shuttered since 1992, both organizations have had their eyes on saving the seaside stadium for years. The National Trust listed the structure, built in 1963, on its annual 11 Most Endangered Historic Places in 2009, and declared it a National Treasure three years later. In a bid to cement its preservation in perpetuity, the stadium has been nominated for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places. If approved, the cost of the restoration would be reduced by $6 million, as the project would qualify for federal historic tax credits. To introduce attendees to the preservation cause, the Dade Trust and the National Trust will run an information kiosk at the Miami International Boat Show, in Virginia Key, from February 11 to 15. A petition that circulating there and online asks City of Miami commissioners to prioritize the stadium's restoration this year. Already, the city has created an advisory committee to decide on future directions for Virginia Key, which includes the restoration and reopening of the stadium. An RFQ for engineering and architectural services for the stadium is out, and so far Miami has spent more than $20 million on restoring land around the stadium. Designed by Hilario Candela, a 27 year old Cuban architect, the all-concrete, 6,566 seat stadium was built to watch speedboat races. The roof, as long as a football field, was the longest span of cantilevered concrete in the world when it was built. The folded plate roof is anchored by eight concrete columns set back as far as physics would allow to afford almost unimpeded views of the bay. To draw attention to their cause and highlight the stadium's design, the National Trust will project vintage stadium footage in the evenings onto the structure this Friday through Sunday.