Posts tagged with "Flooring":

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The next step in renewable energy is right under our feet

The New York Times journalist Thomas Friedman once asked, “Do you know what my favorite renewable fuel is? An ecosystem for innovation.” If you pose the same question to Pavegen founder and CEO Laurence Kemball-Cook, his answer would most likely be: foot traffic. That’s because Kemball-Cook, who is passionate about climate change, believes “technology alone won’t make cities perform more efficiently. It’s about changing behaviors.” To that end, he spent time developing renewable energy solutions in built-up urban environments and ultimately landed on the idea of capturing ambient energy from people and footfall. After testing a series of prototypes, Kemball-Cook jumped in feet first and launched Pavegen, a company that harvests energy and data from foot traffic. Building a complex technological product that operates reliably in all physical conditions isn’t easy, however. City streets are constantly undergoing challenges, from extreme temperature variations to a wide range of forces and impacts, Kemball-Cook explained. “Engineering this versatility into our system has been a big challenge, and it has been a highly iterative process to get to where our design is today,” he said.

How it works

At its core, Pavegen technology is a multi-functional, custom flooring system that transforms foot traffic into off-grid electricity. As pedestrians walk across the system, the weight from their steps creates a vertical movement in the top surface between 5 and 10 millimeters. Electromagnetic generators below the surface compress, creating a rotary motion which produces 2 to 4 joules of energy per step, or roughly 5 watts of continuous power which can be stored in batteries or deployed locally to power applications such as lighting, sensors, and data transmission. Pavegen’s latest model, the V3, features a unique, triangular configuration that enables the tiles’ connected surface to move as a whole. As a result, Kemball-Cook says the formation enables a generator to be placed under each point of the tiles, which translates into greater energy converted per square foot than previous models—200 times more than initial prototypes, in fact. Further, the size of the triangles and the amount of resistance in the flywheels have been modeled using data on the length, speed, and force of human steps. “We use this information to maximize efficiency, and capture most of the available energy from footfall to produce a steady stream of off-grid energy and data.” Additionally, the Pavegen system is able to connect to a range of mobile devices and building management systems. “As well as energy, our systems also provide data on energy output and can connect to users’ smartphones via low-power Bluetooth beacons,” Kemball-Cook said. “We have an app where people can see how much electrical energy they are generating and convert this into rewards, which also generates valuable relationship data.” Ultimately, strengthening the relationship between people and the environment is what Pavegen is all about. “Our technology enables people to directly engage with clean energy, to increase their understanding of sustainability issues, and to generate useful off-grid energy,” he said. “Pavegen’s combination of physical interactivity and rich data is helping to bring smart cities to life. Forget the Internet of Things, we’re building the Internet of Beings.” [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_sby4GR0sD8]

ARCHITECT@WORK – Canada – Where A+D meets INNOVATION!

An exclusive tailored event focusing on innovations for Architects, Interior Designers and Specifiers.  With over 500 innovative products and services showcased by manufacturers and distributors. All exhibitors go through a strict selection process with an external juding panel, ensuring the presence of high caliber innovations. FEATURES include: Keynote Speakers, Accredited Seminars, Materials Exhibit, Project Wall, ART Installation. We offer complimentary catering all day to our exhibitors and attendees, so they can focus on networking and conducting business.    
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Tarkett’s collaboration with Nordic studio reinvents the image of linoleum flooring

Typically, the Stockholm Furniture Fair is thought of as a hotbed for new design, a place where young Nordic designers go to launch their brands. But this year, tried-and-true international furniture purveyors flocked to the Venice of the North to exhibit new pieces and installations—a combination of pleasantly unexpected forms and materials—that would otherwise be held back for Salone del Mobile Milano (or the Milan Furniture Fair). French multi-national floor and wall covering brand Tarkett collaborated with local, multi-disciplinary Note Design Studio on an installation called The Lookout. In the pairing, Note Design Studio's furniture and light fixtures were showcased with the flooring from a three-dimensional vantage point—possibly the coolest way to display product from a vinyl flooring company. (Courtesy Note Design Studio) Aptly dubbed, The Lookout is a synthesis of color, dimension, and texture across a multitude of interior surfaces, and obviously, the floor. A terrazzo vinyl flooring called iQ Megalit was paired with Tarkett's wood, linoleum, and textile surfaces. These tactile coverings were employed across geometric compositions of space, including a zigzagging staircase that leads up to an elevated point to view the fair, stadium-style seating swathed in terrazzo flooring, wall coverings fashioned from oak wood squares, and other furniture outfitted by Tarkett's floor and wall coverings. In a landscape of obsidian, emerald, mint, and charcoal, a stunning shade of apricot (not to be confused with millennial pink) complemented the sea of terrazzo. New designs by the studio were showcased across the marbled topography. The seemingly uncool material, vinyl flooring, was placed in the foreground in line with lighting, sofas, and tables, making it feel more like a well-thought-out interior than an ordinary showroom. The full effect was created with 3,000 square feet of flooring in eight different materials and eight colors at the same time. Ooh la la!
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Product> Surfaces Effective: 14 Innovative Materials

Visual grace notes to architectural compositions, surface and finish materials can bring tactility, color, and pattern into a space. From floor to ceiling, from wood and tile to composites and carpeting, here's our pick of the current palette. Plank Floors Dinesen Founded in 1898, this family-run company sources Douglas fir and oak from the best forests in Europe, selecting trees between eighty and 200 years old for exceptional custom flooring installations. Route 66 Viridian Reclaimed Wood These reclaimed red oak and white oak planks and panels get their rustic character from their original use as decking on tractor-trailers. In a variety of lengths and sizes. Waldilla Offered in five wood species—oak, fumed oak, sycamore maple, American cherry, and birch—these free-form flooring planks are anything but straight and narrow. Linear Line Collection Smith & Fong These carved interior panels are LEED-eligible, as the 4-foot by eight-foot, 3/4 inch sheets are made of 100% FSC-certified bamboo. Aura Dekton These fifty-six-inch by 125-inch ceramic slabs can be bookmatched for exterior or interior applications. Available in three thicknesses: 0.8cm, 1.2cm, and 2.0cm. Deep Nocturne DuPont Corian A classic jet black, the solid surfacing can be used in residential, office, and hospitality projects. The material can be thermoformed or worked using conventional wood-shop techniques. Fossil DTS Offered in five patterns, these 24-inch by 24-inch floor-rated porcelain tiles are available in beige, brown, and grey. Designed by Kasia Zareba. Star Land Porcelanico Frost-resistant, this porcelain tile is thermoformed to achieve a three-dimensional surface. In 60cm by 60cm format. Tierras Artisanal Mutina Made of extruded natural terra cotta, this collection comprises five three-dimensional tiles. Designed by Patricia Urquiola. Luminous Carpets Durable, light-transmissive carpeting from Desso combined with super-thin, programmable LED units from Philips turns the floor into a canvas for communication or decoration. Launching in America in April 2015. Cell Lama Made of industrial wool felt, this carpet is pressed—rather than woven or loomed—into random patterns. The material is non-flammable, soundproof, and water-resistant. HEM Collection Carpet Concept This collection of woven carpet is based on non-directional patterns of colored dots. In thirty-four colorways. Designed by Ben van Berkel/UNStudio. Tatami Nanimarquina Soft New Zealand wool is loomed with crisp jute to create a unique textured floorcovering. Designed by Ariadna Miquel and Nani Marquina. Henrik Large Designtex A wallcovering on DNA substrate, the strong lines and colors produce a dynamic pattern; from a distance, the crisp edges blend into an overall design that recalls an Ikat weave. Tall Wolf-Gordon Bending lines weave foreground and background together to create the illusion of height. In seven colorways. Designed by Morgan Bajardi.
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Eavesdrop> Are You Gonna Go My Colorway? Lenny Kravitz designs a line of hardwood floors

Lenny Kravitz married Lisa Bonet. Lenny Kravitz won a bunch of Grammys. Lenny Kravitz is a member of the Ordre des Artes et des Lettres in France. Lenny Kravitz has washboard abs. Lenny Kravitz sometimes wears high heels. Lenny Kravitz produced Madonna’s “Justify My Love.” Lenny Kravitz designs hardwood floors. The flooring company BR-111 has partnered with Kravitz Design to create a line of hardwood planks that “speaks to urban elegance with a masculine vibe like touches of dark woods,” according to a release. Lenny Kravitz’s hardwood is “sure to become the gold standard in flooring.”