Posts tagged with "Film":

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Lineup Announced For NYC’s Architecture & Design Film Festival

From October 16th through the 20th, Tribeca Cinemas will serve host to the Architecture & Design Film Festival, the country’s leading film festival for the architecture and design community. The festival will offer 25 film screenings, ranging in length from two to 95 minutes, each offering 15 distinct programs, in addition to panel discussions and book signings with internationally renowned designers and filmmakers. See the full schedule here and check out the full list of films with selected trailers below. Tickets go on sale October 1. Full list of films:
  • ABC of Architects
  • The Absent Column
  • Archiculture
  • Away From All Suns!
  • The Barragán House. A Universal Value
  • Bending Sticks: The Sculpture of Patrick Dougherty
  • Building Is People
  • Built on Narrow Land
  • Fagus – Walter Gropius and the factory for modernity
  • Grow Dat Youth Farm
  • Helsinki Music Centre – Prelude
  • The Human Scale
  • If You Build It
  • The Interior Passage
  • The Latin Skyscraper
  • My Brooklyn
  • Not Shown for Clarity
  • The Oyler House: Richard Neutra's Desert Retreat
  • Paul Smith, Gentleman Designer
  • Sagrada – The Mystery Of Creation
  • Skyscape
  • Social Life of Small Urban Spaces
  • Subject, Theory, Practice: An Architecture of Creative Engagement
  • Tadao Ando - From Emptiness to Infinity
  • The Vision of Paolo Soleri: Prophet in the Desert
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Studios at the Ranch: Disney Makes Move to “Hollywood North”

On Tuesday, Los Angeles County's Board of Supervisors voted to approve Disney's huge new TV and film production facility on the Golden Oak Ranch near Santa Clarita. The project is being master planned by LA-based firm, Johnson Fain, and the 58-acre "Studios at the Ranch" will include more than 500,000 square feet of studios, sound stages, offices, writers and producers "bungalows" and other developments. According to site plans submitted to the county the project's sound stages will be located on its southern side, with offices to the north. It will be completed in seven phases. According to the LA Times, the area, nicknamed "Hollywood North" and "Hollywood's Backlot," is becoming increasingly popular for filming because of its low costs and open, diverse spaces. More than half a dozen local ranches now serve as popular filming locations. More pictures and documents for the newest kid on the block below.
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Saturday> Catch the Experimental Urban Film Festival, EZUFF, in Harlem

This Saturday evening, July 20, EZUFF, the Elvis Zapp Urban Projection Project, a mini-film festival, will have its inaugural run at the Mayles Cinema in Harlem. Its goal is to explore “art and city public life” using short experimental film to “make a link between contemporary urban forms of expression/representation and the political imagination for the city of today. It is about oblique ways to dig into present day urban cultures and imagine alternatives for the cities of tomorrow." EZUFF is masterminded by co-founders architect Andrew Macnair and multi-media artist and Mamoru Kobayakawa, along with Robert Bowen, Joke Post, David Kessler, and Kim Steele. In these moving-image explorations you can see the workings out of architectural ideas, the capturing of a moment, of visual connections, poetic explorations, and visual textures. Themes and approaches emerge such as the performative, where we experience the spaces where events take place but don’t necessarily see the event (Scala Zero [La Scala opera house], Yankees Game, Bronx); dystopia, ranging from contagion (Quarantena), waste, or a sinister hypnotic tower (Truth Tower); and music videos (I Came Home Haunted: Nine Inch Nails by David Lynch). A few flip the video images on their side 90 degrees for a vertical format (Towers, Parametric Play) solving the problem of how to show tall structures within a horizontal frame. Here are a few titles to watch for. Prop for All/if then: Arakawa+Gins - Bioscleave House, East Hampton by Robert Bowen centers on this unusual structure in East Hampton by Arakawa and Madelin Gins, a perceptual experiment that thrusts the body into architectural space. The building features an undulating, mottled floor that keeps visitors completely off kilter, a central green recessed warren, and walls of various bright colors inside and out. The film language echoes the intent of the creators: using the idea of a propeller (to literally propel the body forward), the camera spins in continuous tracking shots—right side up, upside down, sideway, interior and exterior—taking in the entire house at once, to the sounds of a chopper’s blades rotating. A second clip from this 18-minute film will also be shown where the house grows up from the ground, then disintegrates into a cloud colored dust. Patrik Shumacher, partner at Zaha Hadid Architects, made the video Parametricism, which is also the term he uses for the style of architecture based on advanced computational design techniques. In a manifesto, he has advocated for the term’s use to describe a style, as one would Baroque or Modernism. This video plays with different black and white visualizations: one linear, the others in 3D—in liquid-like black forms, in white Chicklets, another in white Lego-like chunks on an undulating surface. Forces ply the shapes into shifting elastic contours and you can imagine the firm’s architectural ideas coming to life. Gigdem Talu’s Heteroscapes focuses on the distinctive sounds of a place. Here, the “soundmarks” of Manhattan, Carroll Gardens, and Red Hook are profiled with black and white video (giving more emphasis to sound than picture) that show the “reciprocal relationship with urban morphologies by creating patterns.” Enhancing footage of life on the street, the words “sound diffusion” “street rhythm” and “sound dissipation” accompany diagrams that show urban patterns, sections , and density. Close you eyes to see if you can identify the neighborhood. Ineke Liesting’s Rotating Rietveld: Schroder-Schrader House, Utrecht illustrates the harmony of composition by rotating the image of this De Stijl-style house. The composition is perfectly balanced in any direction. (Footage is very low tech, taken with a cellphone camera.) Chairarch, Australia by Glue Society is a delightful whimsy that takes colorful chairs into a blinding white snowscape by men clad in white spacesuits, which they stack and raise into an arched rainbow “because we can.” July 20, 7:00 pm Maysles Cinema 343 Malcolm X Blvd /Lenox Ave
 between 127 & 128 streets (212)537-6843 Future showings: September 17, 7:00 pm Spectrum Space, 121 Ludlow St., 2nd Floor, New York 10002
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Video> Bouroullec Brothers’ Quiet Motion Takes A Spin in Milan

At Salone del Mobile in April, French designers Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec demonstrated what it’s like to take a spin in a BMWi. Quiet Motion, the Bouroullec brothers’ interactive interpretation of the sustainable electric car brand, was an installation open for visitors to climb onto revolving platforms to relax as the world leisurely passed around them. Situated within a picturesque cloister of a Milanese monastery, four spinning cork platforms rotated slowly and quietly as, according to the brothers, “an allegorical interpretation of movement and contemplation.” The designers construed the concept of sustainable mobility with materials such as fabrics made of the sustainable wool yarn used as seat upholstery in the electric car and lightweight carbon columns produced using renewable energy resources. To reference materials used in car design, blue fabric strips surrounded each of the four carousels and leather covered the platforms. Bouroullec brothers-designed Aim lamps hung from the ceilings and illuminated the area at night. Materials commonly associated with furniture and interiors such as cork and fabrics were also utilized.

Documentarian Wants to Retell the History of LA’s Ambassador Hotel

In 2005, the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles became one of the most notable buildings in U.S. history to be torn down. Now a new documentary, After 68: The Rise and Fall of the Ambassador Hotel, is hoping to tell its story. Its filmmakers are raising money to finish the project through a Kickstarter campaign. Directed by Camilo Silva, the film explores the history of the hotel, once a symbol of LA's opulent westward expansion. The Ambassador hosted, among others, Albert Einstein, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Winston Churchill, Amelia Earhart, Salvador Dali, Buzz Aldrin, Charles Lindbergh, Babe Ruth, Frank Sinatra, and Charlie Chaplin, and every U.S. president from Herbert Hoover to Richard Nixon. And of course Robert F. Kennedy was assassinated at its Coconut Grove nightclub, a location that also hosted six Academy Awards ceremonies. In 2005 the beleaguered hotel was torn down to build a $600 million school complex for the LA Unified School District. The film digs into the building's past and the controversy over its end, and captures the oral histories that are some of its only remaining memories. The Kickstarter campaign ends in two weeks.
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On View> Dara Friedman’s New Film Dances Through City Streets, Now Showing in Los Angeles

Hammer Projects: Dara Friedman Hammer Museum 10899 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles Through April 14 Miami-based artist Dara Friedman is known for her black and white films of dancers dancing through city streets. For her film Dancer (2011) she used a 16mm camera to examine urban space and individuals within these spaces, filming improvisational dancers in a variety of styles, from flamenco, to ballet, to belly and break dancing, and more. In her work, Friedman also investigates accepted concepts of performance-based art. Her grainy films sometimes capture the sounds of street traffic, and she sometimes dubs music that is not always in rhythm with the dancers’ movements. For her first exhibition in Los Angeles, Friedman has prepared an 8mm film that is a follow-up to Dancer.
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Lights, Camera, Diller, Scofidio + Renfro

Diller, Scofidio + Renfro

This weekend's Open House New York tours and special building openings will end with a special film screening at Tribeca Cinema. The screening will feature a new Checkerboard Foundation Production of Diller, Scofidio + Renfro that highlights the local firm's two most important projects: The High Line and Lincoln Center.

Checkerboard is well known for their architecture documentaries and this one features DS+R's recent contributions to New York's streetscape. The film starts at 7:00 on Sunday and tickets can be purchased in advance.

 

Event> Archi-Filmmaker Evan Mather In Focus

While feature length architecture documentaries like My ArchitectVisual Acoustics and Unfinished Spaces have received oscar nominations and international acclaim (sometimes both), there's always room in our hearts for shorts. One of the most talented filmmakers in this genre is Evan Mather, who has put together a string of the briefer variety. Eight of his shorts will be screened tomorrow evening at LA's A+D Museum as part of its on screen series. Mather, who has been making films since he was eight years old, is also a landscape architect, working as a principal at LA's AHBE landscape architects. He's brought that expertise to films for AHBE and others. He's also made a feature, A Neccessary Ruin, about Buckminster Fuller's Union Tank Car Dome. "I'm interested in the perception of landscapes and how we remember them—how they influence us," said Mather, who grew up in New Orleans. Although, he adds, "It can be a challenge to convey highly technical information in an interesting way." One of the pieces, Building A Sustainable Future, documents the creation of AHBE's work at Burbank Water and Power, which included the transformation of abandoned substation into a large vine trellis, employee garden and courtyard.  Another, Pavilion dans les Arbes, is the story of Touraine Richmond Architects'  beautiful new Silverwood Lake State Recreation Area Visitors’ Center in California’s San Bernardino Mountains. A third is 12 Minutes to Vegas, which through time-lapse video compresses the three-and-a-half hour drive from Los Angeles to Las Vegas into 12 minutes. Now that's speeding. Others tackle issues in the profession like recycling paper waste (So What?), using traditional materials in new ways (Ojama), and design philosophy (Expressions). Mather believes that this type of video work will soon become the norm in architecture. "As designers we need move beyond relying on animated fly-thrus and video translations of PowerPoint presentations... With these tools being so accessible more and more design firms are using video to communicate their work."
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A Film About Rem By his Son and OMA

The film My Architect, the story of Louis Kahn’s son on a mission to discover and understand his father, won over the hearts and praise of even the lay-est of architectural laypersons. The effects of which—a fresh spotlight on the work and life of a brilliant designer—did not fall on blind eyes. Tomas Koolhaas is making a film about his father, Rem Koolhaassee the Facebook page!—called REM set to debut in 2013. It also appears from rough clips that the CCTV building in China will play a central role in the story. Awesome! We can’t wait to see this quaint little film about a humble and modest architect and his role in designing the media headquarters for political oppression and censorship in China. We’ll get the popcorn! An interview with a homeless person inside the Seattle Public Library: Footage from February 2012 of the completed CCTV building: Koolhaas talks with workers at the CCTV building while it's under construction:
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Breaking Out & Breaking In: Designers, Critics, and FBI Agents

Bringin' it back to the old school, to the days of 3D online meet-up spots and avatars, when chat rooms were actual digitally-modelled rooms, "Breaking Out and Breaking In" was a "distributed film fest," where users watched movies at home and came together in the comments section of BLDGBLOG to discuss the films. It was a blurring of the real and the digital. In partnership with Filmmaker magazine, the series focused on films which were either about bank heists (breaking in) or prison escapes (breaking out), positing them as "the use and misuse of space." Films were watched during a period of four months, and the festival culminated with a panel discussion at Columbia's GSAPP featuring two FBI agents alongside designers and critics. The panel was moderated by Studio-X director Geoff Manaugh, and consisted of Jimmy Stamp, writer and editor from Yale University, Matt Jones, designer and principal of Berg, Special Agent Brenda Cotton, bank robbery coordinator with the FBI, and Thomas McShane, a retired special agent from the FBI Art Crime Team. The discussion explored a variety of questions, including how criminals need to understand buildings differently from architects as they attempt to subvert them and what the alternate routes and spatial scenarios of crimes reveal about hidden architectures within buildings. Through a close analysis of classic heist movies and escape films, and with the help of the virtual pop-up space of the online comments, the film fest attempted to answer these questions. The panel zoomed out, looking at the practice of breaking in/out in general. Jimmy Stamp explained how in academia they took a very rational approach to analysis of crimino-spatial activity, but after a writer from Law and Order visited the school, they were taken aback at how emotional and real these stories were. "These were actual people being murdered," he said. While a student at Yale, Stamp co-organized a crime and architecture symposium called "Fugitive Geographies," but also worked as a bank designer in San Francisco, designing odd, maze-like structures, which to his surprise, clients often loved. Using check counters as barriers against robbery, sometimes counter-intuitive plans were favored. Stamp quipped, "As long as your bank is harder to rob than the one next door." Brenda Cotton, who had the most practical experience with bank heists made some interesting comparisons of Los Angeles to New York, having worked in both cities. Los Angeles has freeways and parking, which make it much easier to rob a bank there. In New York, there is less parking and more congestion with less access to freeways.  Also, surveillance in New York is much better. When a bank is robbed, the first thing the FBI does is canvass for security footage. It can come from banks, nearby businesses, the subways, and the NYPD. McShane recounted stories of various NYC criminals who used nefarious architectural experiences to rob people.  The Fly was especially athletic and would climb buildings, sneaking into windows and handing valuables down to friends waiting below. He also noted that museums are guarded by people making very little money, and are thus vulnerable to heists. Designer Matt Jones explained that crime is a series of designs and counter designs. Cameras were designed, then facepaint to obscure the camera's watching eye would be invented, so cameras that were immune to the facepaint would crop up. Scott MacCauley, editor-in-chief at Filmmaker, spoke of his time making films, where consideration must be made for realistic movies. For instance, you can't bounce around from neighborhood to neighborhood and maintain the spatial drama that is required for a heist movie. Overall, an entertaining night, which ventured outside the box (and into the tunnel) for architectural insight from a well-rounded panel.
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On View> 1976: Movies, Photographs and Related Works on Paper

1976: Movies, Photographs and Related Works on Paper Paul Kasmin Gallery 515 West 27th St. Through February 11 British-born James Nares has lived in New York since the mid-1970s, when Lower Manhattan was “a beautiful ruin,” according to the artist. While most celebrated for his large, single-stroke kinetic paintings, the artist has a long track record of documenting his fascination with movement and bodies in motion dating back to the days when he delved into many other media such as films and chronophotographs. The exhibition features five films including Pendulum (1976), in which Nares clocks a large spherical mass swinging from a footbridge, against the industrial backdrop of downtown Manhattan—evocative of the foreboding, dreamlike qualities also seen in Giorgio de Chirico’s surreal paintings.
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FLW Double Header! Experience Fallingwater at the Guggenheim

Attention Frank Lloyd Wright fans! You can satisfy two Wright cravings with this one event. Head over the the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum to catch a screening of Kenneth Love's lush new documentary Fallingwater: Frank Lloyd Wright's Masterwork with Reflections of Edgar Kaufmann Jr. The film, which was supported by the James Marston Fitch Charitable Foundation, the Estate of Edgar Tafel, and the Laurel Foundation, will be screened in the museum's New Media Theatre on October 21 and 28 and November 4 and 18 at 1:00 and 3:00 pm. The screenings are free with the price of admission to the museum. It's the perfect marriage of content and container. Wright would approve.