Posts tagged with "Fernando Mastrangelo":

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At Collective Design, inflatable landscapes, spinning playgrounds, and other architectural highlights

AN’s editors toured the 6th edition of The Collective Design Fair at the Skylight Clarkson North this morning. At the fair known for its creative installations, we strolled through aisles of booths occupied by design-focused galleries and site-specific creations by local designers and museums. Several, highlighted below, walk that dazzling line between art, design, and architecture.   Natural Workshop by Jesse Seegers and Brook Landscape Tucked behind the show lies an ephemeral playground by Jesse Seegers surrounding a forested landscape by Brook Landscape. Seegers describes the process as “inflatable spaces I design, make the patterns for, cut out, and do physics simulations, digitally, to see what the finished design will look like.” The actualized forms are inflated by a constant stream of air that inflates three "breathing" plastic bellies. “I intentionally designed very simple forms,” explained Seegers. “This one is a standard tube, while the other two are tapered, which exaggerates the perspective.” VIP lounge by Leonidas Trampoukis and Eleni Petaloti of LOT office for architecture Though it is called the VIP lounge, founding partner of LOT and Objects of Common Interest, Leonidas Trampoukis, would describe the topography of glass blocks and slabs of acrylic his firm created as “more an installation.” Fashioned from translucent cuboids from Glass Block Warehouse Inc. and glossy umber-hued acrylic by Plaskolite, the purely decorative furnishings exude whimsical and textural vocabulary. My Reality by Crosby Studios Harry Nuriev, founder of Crosby Studios, is heavily influenced by growing up in Moscow. His Collective booth is lined by larger than life photos of his childhood apartment complex, a place he left at just 10 years old. While he practices primarily in New York City, the artist and architect draws inspiration from his formative years, in this case, the nostalgic memory of the traditional carousels of his younger years. Nuriev reinterpreted his childhood playground as a vibrant purple roundtable that spins in circles, a symbolic gesture to his formative years and inspiration. The Dream by Fernando Mastrangelo Inspired by Henri Rousseau’s painting The Dream, Fernando Mastrangelo created a sumptuous, curvilinear furniture landscape fashioned from sand molded with acrylic resin. Mastrangelo explains that the process to make wall tiles and other furniture, “as kind of like sand castle-style packing sand, only into a mold.” A surreal mountainous landscape surrounds the focal point of the space, a sand-cast sofa upholstered in oxblood cashmere, while the painting is visible through a nook in the wall, making the deep emeralds, reds, and oranges glow richly throughout the tableau.
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Collective Design Fair 2017 Recap

Collective Design opened today for its fifth fair focused on 20th- and 21st-century design with 28 exhibitors. Founded by architect and interior designer Steven Learner specifically for the design and architectural community, the fair will host galleries, designers, and commercial brands from May 3 to May 7. The design world continues to be enraptured by surrealism and, as a result, bright colors and fantastical forms reigned throughout. Paris-based Swiss designer, Mattia Bonetti’s work was highlighted as the Collective Influence installation that included Bonetti’s riotous sofa and Seussical-style lamp and side table. Just around the corner, R & Company touted the new generation of maximal whimsy with pieces by the Haas Brothers, Katie Stout, and Porky Hefer. More and more, companies are integrating technology to take the possibility of designs to new heights. At Collective, Othr’s 3-D printed works and Flavor Paper’s use of water-based conductive ink make a strong showing. Othr’s Vanguard Series took advantage of 3-D printing (Othr 3-D prints all of its wares, partnering with designers to create its pieces) by having Murray Moss, Annabelle Selldorf, Felix Burrichter, Christian Larsen, and India Mahdavi each nominate an emerging designer to create a piece for Othr. As a result, Egg Collective, GT2P, Ania Jaworska, Marie-Victoire Winckler, and Chen Chen and Kai Williams all created stunning vessels in a variety of 3-D printed porcelain, steel, and bronze. Flavor Paper presented Conduct, a playful immersive installation that demonstrated the ability of wallpaper to transfer energy. Flavor Paper founder Jon Sherman discovered water-based conductive ink two years ago and partnered with UM Project to help display its potential. By pressing dots on the wallpaper, one can activate lights, sound, and movement in the installation. Other highlights included new iterations of Apparatus’s, Stickbulb’s, and Calico Wallpaper’s offerings from Milan Design Week, as well as the Noguchi Museum’s Waiting Room installation of Robert Stadler and Isamu Noguchi’s works, which coincides with an exhibition at the museum (far, far away in Queens). Thanks to Collective Design’s manageable size (one can easily navigate the entire show in under two hours), and fresh offerings, it will undoubtedly be a popular stop on this month’s design circuit.
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Craft collaborations elevate Thakoon’s flagship Soho store by SHoP Architects

Like an architect, fashion designer Thakoon Panichgul carefully balances contemporary and historical influences. His eponymous brand has won him fans from Michelle Obama to Target, but when it came time to build a brick-and-mortar store, Panichgul and New York–based SHoP faced a more complex balancing act. They wanted to carefully devise an interior that would reflect its Soho surroundings and the Thakoon aesthetic, all while grabbing the attention of passersby and setting itself apart from competitors.

“Thakoon was really interested in making [the store] of its place, of New York, bringing in the grit of the city,” said Coren Sharples, principal at SHoP. Concrete with dark aggregate covers the floors, and the architects tapped Brooklyn-based Fernando Mastrangelo Studio to cast multiple concrete walls throughout the store. Mastrangelo reproduced the subtle gradients of his furniture on an architectural scale, pouring multiple layers of gray-hued concrete in a single casting. “This was crazy, it was done on site,” said Sharples. “This was formed up and poured. Really a little scary, but [Mastrangelo] was amazing.”

Wood was also an important part of Panichgul’s vision—the designer had prepared a mood board with several wood treatments that figured prominently in other fashion brands’ aesthetics. These ranged from light treatments with vernacular ornamentation (what he called “American Traditional”) to richly grained and darkly stained (“American Glam”). SHoP and Panichgul ultimately chose an unfinished white oak (“American Cool”), a look that left the wood in its raw, natural state. White oak surfaces sinuously undulate along the showroom’s walls even as they retain a dry, coarse texture. The architects and client also worked closely with Brooklyn-based furniture maker Vonnegut/Kraft on the store’s wood furniture: Connection details, leather seating, and each edge and taper went through multiple iterations before landing on a design that features simple woven-leather straps. Vonnegut/Kraft’s pieces stand in the main showroom and hug the curves of each dressing room.

Extra seating is provided by travertine blocks that were CNC-milled in Italy to 3-D models provided by SHoP. Panichgul tapped London-based designer Michael Anastassiades for the principal lighting features: simple orbs with brass detailing. Brass is also used for the store’s clothing rods and the towering sculptural display rack that stands prominently in the main showroom.

Taken all together, the materials find ways to somehow be both angular and curved, smooth and gritty, even as their neutral tones give the clothing center stage. “We wanted it to be infused with material sensibility and warmth, but at the same time, it’s always this line you walk because you don’t want to overpower or dictate,” said Sharples.

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You can see entire landscapes in this recently released furniture series

Powdered glass, dyed sand, silica, coffee—these are the materials designer Fernando Mastrangelo used to craft his latest furniture series, dubbed "Escape." As exotic as those materials may seem, they're just the tip of the iceberg for New York–based Mastrangelo. His studio has experimented extensively with unusual castings, using salt, sugar, corn, salt, cement, sprinkles, metal beads, and more, in its sculptures and furniture. Mastrangelo recently collaborated with SHoP Architects to cast entire walls in Thakoon, a newly-minted Soho boutique clothing store (look for it the most recent edition of AN Interior!). "Escape," which recently made its debut in Milan, finds fresh inspiration in the natural world. The series "is inspired by the perfect compositions of landscapes and horizons, which are at once harsh and geometric, yet soft and gentle," Mastrangelo told The Architect's Newspaper. "I wanted to create objects that capture that language, and the profound sense of calm and contemplation that stems from a connection to nature. This is the first time we’ve cast powdered glass, which has a unique luminous quality that really makes the pieces feel alive." The new collection is now on view at the Maison Gerard (53 East 10th Street, New York) from April 13th to May 5th.
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Fernando Mastrangelo’s MMaterial collection uses hand-dyed cements to produce multihued furniture

Featured at the third annual Sight Unseen OFFSITE fair, Brookyn-based artist Fernando Mastrangelo calls his Fade Series of the MMATERIAL line “functional sculptures.” They're the result of a minimalist aesthetic blended with sculptural craftsmanship. The pieces are composed of hand-dyed cements transforming a rugged material into simplistic blends of color to create ombre effects. Much of Mastrangelo's work uses aggregates such as rock, sand, glass, and silica in addition to hand-dyed cements. These elements are fused together in Mastrangelo’s casting process which uses salt, sugar, sand, coffee, and corn. This range of materials results in distinct tables, desks, cylinders, and custom pieces that can seem reminiscent of vast landscapes. Each piece is unique.