Posts tagged with "Fashion":

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The Banality of Fashion

First the cracks, and now this? Sure, Peter Eisenman's Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe in Berlin has seen its fair share of controversies over the years, but it doesn't get much worse than a fashion shoot for an in-flight magazine. According to the New Statesman's scoop, easyJet had no idea the Holocaust memorial had been used as the backdrop for a bunch of models because its magazine is produced by an outside company. That company has yet to speak up about the matter, so it remains unclear whether the fine folks at INK publishing are ignorant or just stupid. Looks like Hannah Arendt is right once again. UPDATE: Ink Publishing, the company behind the offending shoot responds, and it's worse than we thought:
Ink Publishing sincerely apologises to anyone who may have been offended by the fashion shoot in the November issue of easyJet inflight, in which a model is photographed in front of Berlin's Holocaust Memorial. Far from trivializing the Memorial, on the contrary the intention was to encourage passengers to visit for themselves. The aim of each monthly shoot is to highlight an easyJet destination and tell a relevant narrative. The shoot was intended to not only promote local design talent and the city itself, but to raise awareness. From an educational perspective, it is of the utmost importance that visitors to Berlin see the Jewish Museum (who gave us written permission to shoot in their grounds) and Holocaust Memorial first hand. We absolutely regret any offence caused.
We're speechless yet again.
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Vito Acconci, Male Model

Back in June, we spoke with Vito Acconci about his decision to close up shop. The artist and designer essentially said he was yet another victim of the recession—"The contradictory thing is that at a time when there are these architectural projects that we have the possibility of doing, how do we keep the studio active on a day-to-day basis?"—but now we're wondering if he maybe had a career change in mind. It would appear so, as Archinect alerts us to Vito's appearance in none other than October's J. Crew catalog. Maybe it's some kind of performance art? He's ready for his close-up after the jump.
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Wearable Architecture

We’ve heard the story now and again, designers being influenced by art and architecture, but just when we thought architects were the ones taking cues from designers – think Zaha – Italian shoe company Sergio Rossi’s Creative Director Francesco Russo, in a related press statement, cites specific references to the work of Hadid and photographer David Zimmerman in his latest shoe collection. While we’re not quite sure if Russo was inspired by her shoes or buildings, his shoes, nonetheless, are composed of bold colors and graphic designs, reminiscent of some of Hadid’s most striking architecture. Available in high-rising stilettos, towering wedges, strappy sandals, and boots high and low, the shoes come in a variety of textures including watersnake skin, goatskin, suede, leather, and natural linen. The shoes are offset by the fluidity of their soft lines, characteristic of all Sergio Rossi designs. Part of the designer’s Cruise collection, the shoes can be purchased online and at Saks Fifth Avenue come fall. Do you buy the influence?
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In Her Shoes

London-based architect Zaha Hadid’s latest project explores futuristic vessels of movement in relation to the human body, or in non-archispeak she’s designed a pair of shoes! Initially previewed during the Frieze Art Fair in London this past October, the collaboration between the famed architect and the French apparel company LACOSTE has finally become a realized product that will be ready for production in July 2009. The Zaha Hadid for LACOSTE footwear collaboration is not Hadid’s first venture into shoe design. Having already designed a pair of eco-friendly rubber shoes with Brazilian label Melissa, Hadid’s new line features both men’s and women’s calf leather boots that enwrap the foot from sole to ankle to leg in an continuous and fluid manner. “The design expression behind the collaboration with LACOSTE footwear allows the evolution of dynamic fluid grids,” said Hadid, according to a official statement from LACOSTE. “When wrapped around the shape of a foot, these expand and contract to negotiate and adapt to the body ergonomically. In doing so a landscape emerges, undulating and radiating as it merges seamlessly with the body.” Beginning as a “digitized interpretation” of the iconic LACOSTE crocodile, Hadid’s research team explored a series of surfaces with repeated patterns to create the finished product. Made from a combination of heat embossing (ridges) and debossing (grooves) techniques on the leather, the pattern covers the shoe, with details on the sole and heel, including a unique Zaha Hadid for LACOSTE logo. The limited-edition collection of approximately 850 pairs of shoes will be available in black and purple for women and black and navy for men at high-end boutiques in Paris, London and Milan, while a main range of shoes are scheduled to be released worldwide in September.
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AvroKUTE

New York-city based design and concept firm AvroKO, the masterminds behind various self-propelled projects such as PUBLIC and Double Crown restaurants, recently revealed their latest venture--as fashion designers. Teaming up with the Mona & Holly studio, AvroKO will release a limited edition of service uniforms in April as part of their Spring ’09 collection. Inspired by “smart and tidy service uniforms of decades past,” the collection doesn’t stray from AvroKO’s signature aesthetic--concept driven designs that are somewhat nostalgic of times past while maintaining a sense of modernity. The uniforms, which will be worn by PUBLIC and Double Crown staff beginning early May, bridge the gap between hospitality and fashion through the functionality of the pieces and overall design. The collection contains basic shift dresses, flouncy skirts, and structured tops that are elegantly detailed, glamorizing the femininity of uniforms of decades past. AvroKO’s collection for Mona & Holly will be available for purchase in select boutiques in New York, Chicago, and Dallas, with pieces ranging in price from $75 to $365.
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Mari(mekko) Has a Brand New Bag

Leading Finnish textile and clothing company Marimekko recently unveiled a new line of women’s bags that reflect the distinctive design and simple pragmatism for which the company is known. Based on an existing Marimekko tableware fabrics, the bags are patterned using state-of-the-art printing technology in keeping with the cheerful, utilitarian Marimekko aesthetic, and are available in an array of colors and materials including the company’s trademark cotton canvas, Italian patent leather, and metal. Fashioned to be a bold personal statement as well as a practical handbag with functional details, these bright bags are contemporary while maintaining a sense of everyday practicality. From stylish evening bags to work totes, Mari’s new bags are suited to fit any well-designed lifestyle!
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Not Exactly Glass Slippers…

Reminiscent of the ever-so-popular jelly shoes of the 1980s, and more recent incarnations such as Marc Jacobs Rubber Ballet Flat Shoes which debuted in 2007, Italian furniture powerhouse Kartell, internationally renowned for modern furniture design in plastics, and young Italian fashion label .normaluisa recently released a shoe collection of plastic ballerina flats aptly called “Glue Cinderella.” Combining Kartell’s innovative technology with .normaluisa’s youthful design sensibility their latest collaboration offers classic style with an edgy vibe. In a statement released about the new partnership, Lorenza Luti, the company’s 30-year-old marketing and retail manager and mind behind the project said, “Kartell is not merely a design company, but an authentic lifestyle brand. It has been the leading brand in experimentation with plastics for sixty years and has made transparency its trademark. Consequently, when I started to think about a range of shoes, it was natural to give the product our imprint.” Giving the shoe its imprint is just what Kartell did. Made from an injection-molding technology that allows for the creation of two-tone shoes combining transparent and opaque materials, the shoe is available in a variety of shades including neutral beige, deep blue, white, red, violet, green, and crystalline. For $135, you can slip into a pair of your own. The sticky slippers are on sale now at Kartell flagship stores and select boutiques in New York City and throughout the world.
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Ciao, Bryant Park

The AP first reported last night, and the mayor confirmed it earlier today: Fashion Week is departing Bryant Park for Lincoln Center. But not just any Lincoln Center. The new-and-improved, Diller Scofidio + Renfro-approved Lincoln Center. According to Bloomberg--in this case, we mean both the mayor and his eponymous news service, via the latter link above--the festivities will take place at the center's Damrosch Park. We emailed the ever-fashionable "R" in DS+R, Charles Renfro, to get his take on the news:
In general, Fashion Week is one of the most vibrant events that New York has to offer. We are pleased that they have chosen Lincoln Center as their venue. It suggests that Lincoln Center’s efforts to shift perceptions of the facility from elitist acropolis to popular forum have been effective. Those efforts include the redesign of course, but also include more youthful and affordable programming. For heaven’s sake, I saw Sufjan Stevens perform there. And my tickets were free!
Now while we agree with that sentiment, Fashion Week seems to run counter, more exclusive elitism than than inviting populism. Still, our dear Renfro persists:
Like most events at Lincoln Center,  one can purchase tickets to Fashion Week tent shows, though I will admit that price points are higher than the current $20 Met cheap seats. And they sell out fast. Fashion Week is not that different than a Giants game: If you have any desire to go, you can buy a ticket. If you can get one, a seat on the 50 yards line will set you back $700 while a fashion week tent ticket will set you back $150, and all the tent seats are essentially 50 yard line seats.
If you say so. As for the park itself, "We haven’t moved into that phase of the redesign yet," Renfor wrote, and it remains to be seen if, whether, or how Fashion Week might impact the redesign--a rather controversial one at that, because it will remake one of Dan Kiley's more famous landscapes. Best known for free summer concerts--we especially enjoyed Mahmoud Ahmed last year--the new digs will almost certainly be fancier than the former ones, at least after DS+R is through with them. The trade offs: far less subway access--the Times points out that Chelsea Piers posed a similar challenge in 1997--and a departure from the industry's psychic home, the Garment District. Still, the move was inevitable, as Times fashion writer Eric Wilson makes clear:
Although the fashion shows, now operating as Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week to reflect a corporate sponsorship, were welcomed in Bryant Park in 1993, there were frequent clashes with the management company that controls its maintenance and security. The dispute intensified in 2006, when the Bryant Park Corporation announced it would no longer allow the shows to happen in the park, because they were interfering with plans to operate a skating rink in the winter and public use of the main lawn in the late summer.
And so, greener pastures have now been traded for chicer ones.