Posts tagged with "Facades+ AM":

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Redefining residential architecture: Clark Manus

The Architect's Newspaper (AN) spoke with Clark Manus, formerly the 87th president of the AIA, who will be presenting at the upcoming Facades+ AM San Francisco panel titled “Redefining Residential Architecture.” Manus has served as an advisor to the Mayor of San Francisco, chairing the Citizens Advisory Group for the area that was vacated for the removal of the freeways in Rincon Hill in the 1980s. He currently lives in Oakland and was appointed by its mayor to serve as Planning Commissioner. Also a CEO of Heller Manus Architects, Manus says his firm has completed over 50 projects at a range of scales, jokingly saying they have done everything aside from hospitals and jails. We spoke about defining issues in the Bay Area that are shaping new construction: cost of construction, San Francisco’s historic urban fabric, energy codes, and more. On Cost of Construction Manus says the difference in the type of facade materials you would use in a Type III building—rainscreen assemblies, punched windows, shingles—is dramatically different than a Type I building where curtain walls are utilized. Manus said California’s statute of limitations for condo liability—set at 10-years—establishes a motive for developers to construct buildings using more durable Type I construction, as opposed to Type III or Type V, when they can afford it. "You begin to look at issues on the facade related to the efficiency of the structural system, and the use of skin materials that are going to be better to deal with water and noise: potential problems that might exist over time. So the difference between using a curtain wall versus a window wall is maybe a dollar issue, but we tend to try and help clients understand the basis for deciding on a skin irrespective of the efficiency of the floor plan is really related to a whole bunch of other issues. There's a whole bunch of glass curtain wall buildings." On Context and Urban Fabric “In some ways San Francisco is a little schizophrenic in that it absolutely loves its Victorians and historic fabric, but it also aspires to looking for a modern vocabulary.” Manus says facade expressions vary heavily with context. In traditional neighborhoods, an emphasis on compositional strategies involving bay windows and other vernacular elements are prioritized, while areas with less context tend to receive a more minimal and/or modern aesthetic. “Community groups in these neighborhoods want to be involved in a dialogue about what will be constructed. As an architect, this presents a challenge in terms of where your project fits and where it does not. There is also a planning department that does very detailed design review on projects, so as an architect you go through a discussion with them in addition to presenting to community groups about what might fit in. Our projects in these neighborhoods are not the same ones we would do in a new district where there is no context.” On Energy Codes Despite a temperate climate, heat gain from glazed facades still presents a significant design issue. Manus says energy conscious design has a lot to do with the facade, it's orientation to the sun, glazing, and other elements that will assist the building in getting to a higher level of efficiency. "The energy codes are really great at creating a better environment, but have made glass darker and darker which, in my mind, is not really conducive to creating a visible transparency for residential use. It's really unfortunate. If you want to see the life of the city, and what's going on behind the facade, you don't want a dark or mirrored glass." Manus' projects, while market rate, have significant inclusionary housing in them. Anywhere from 12, 15, or 18 percent, which he cites as an “unusual rate.” He concludes that the growth of San Francisco—or the “transformation of San Francisco,” as he calls it—is great, but very challenging because with success comes things that you sometimes don't anticipate. “I think getting out in front of developments and truly creating new housing takes a long time. Issues like high cost of construction basically take hold very early on in the process. The regulatory environment, compounded with the process of developing drawings, and the course of construction takes time—you could either be through another cycle, or you could have created other problems you didn't anticipate.” Manus takes the stage with Anne Fougeron of Fougeron Architecture and Cynthia Parker of BRIDGE Housing to discuss more aspects of facades and residential architecture. Go to Facades+ AM San Francisco to learn more about the event and the other sessions taking place.
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Preview the upcoming Facades+ AM conference in San Francisco

On December 7th, Facades+ AM will return to San Francisco. It’s the last event of this year's Facades+ AM conferences, which have visited Los Angeles, New York City, Washington D.C., Boston, Kansas City, and Dallas. The morning-long program will be delivered in a unique three-session format that condenses a typical two-day event into a quick-take forum tailor-made for the Bay Area. The conference will pair regional and national leaders in building envelope design with local design professionals and industry leaders who will deliver presentations and participate in Q&A discussions. John Kuchen, associate director at SOM and chair of the San Francisco conference, said the format brings together a wide range of groups who share a common interest in advancing the role of the building skin. "Now with increased technological capacity, we can tune the facade with its related building systems. High-performance design involves MEP systems, lighting systems, overall vision area versus opaque area, automation capabilities, thermal response, and more. I am interested to see the discussions that result from bringing together professionals from a variety of backgrounds all involved in one way or another the production of a building envelope." Kuchen says the flow of the conference was carefully thought out. The Redefining Residential Architecture session highlights issues that the building envelope plays in housing by bringing together leaders in design and development of housing in the Bay Area. This conversation will lead into a set of presentations concerning high-performance design and energy consumption. Titled High-Performance Design + the Building Envelope, this session will introduce insights from leading facade engineers and building science specialists. Kuchen says “high-performance” is not a new issue in architecture: "For us, high-performance is something that has always been inherent in architecture. It's becoming something that is becoming more relevant to clients and end users of the buildings because of the search for a more sustainable method of building."  The conference will conclude with a panel of presentations focused on the next generation of facades. Over the coming weeks leading up to the conference, The Architect's Newspaper will be interviewing presenters—sharing their insights and previewing the issues that will be discussed. More details can be found at Facades+ AM.
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The University of Kansas’s Paola Sanguinetti on the role of the user in facade performance

Image credit: James Ewing/OTTO When it comes to using computational tools to predict the energy and cost savings associated with high performance facade design, explained Paola Sanguinetti, Professor of Architecture at The University of Kansas (KU), AEC industry professionals often leave out a critical factor: the user. "My recent research explores how we can model the relationship between the comfort of the users and their perception of the space, and how that affects [environmental performance]," said Sanguinetti, who will participate in a presentation block on "Parametric Facade Optimization at All Scales" at September’s Facades+AM Kansas City symposium. "Depending on the kind of facade utilized, the way the user modifies the space really impacts the envelope and thus the overall performance of the building." Another research priority at KU, said Sanguinetti, has to do with modeling building performance at different scales, "from thermal bridges to how the facade [as a whole] aids in energy reduction." The focus on scale, she said, is part of "a more holistic view of building environments," which considers individual buildings as components of a broader network, such as a university campus or neighborhood. "How you can look at metrics for evaluating performance on the urban scale is very relevant for Kansas City," given its smart city aims, said Sanguinetti. According to Sanguinetti, Kansas City’s design and building communities exemplify an integrated approach to modeling and fabrication. "Zahner has pioneered the collaborative approach to design specification and manufacturing," she said. The city’s sports architecture firms, too, "have a very strong collaboration with consultants." At KU, the architecture program emphasizes "sustainability, but also understanding the entire process, and the importance of collaboration," explained Sanguinetti. In 2014, for instance, the design/build program Studio 804 created The Forum, an addition to the university’s historical School of Architecture building Marvin Hall. Graduate students worked with Transsolar to evaluate the addition’s double skinned facade, including performing a survey of student use. There is, of course, always room for improvement, said Sanguinetti. The local AEC industry could do a better job of sharing data on projects. In addition, "embedding risk analysis is important to help have a good conversation about building envelopes," she said. "Any simulation is an estimation; again, the human variable is critical to understanding building performance." Meet Sanguinetti and other leading lights of Kansas City’s facades scene at Facades+AM September 15. Seating is extremely limited; register today!
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Seattle’s Facades+ AM Morning Forum captivates facade designers with details of Amazon domes, more

After a whirlwind round of conferences and forums this year—from New York, to Chicago to Miami—The Architect’s Newspaper and Enclos made the last stop of the year in Seattle for Facades+ AM. Over 150 attended our December 4th event at the Motif Seattle hotel. Nine speakers brought in diverse perspectives and engaging ideas, with room for productive Q & A. Here's a recap in case you missed it. After opening remarks by co-chairs Carsten Stinn, designer at Perkins+Will, and Mic Patterson, Enclos' VP of strategic development, the first session united three presenters under the theme of complex digital facade collaborations. Speakers included Jeffrey Vaglio, director of Enclos' Advanced Technology Studio, and Joshua Zabel, vice president of business development at Kreysler & Associates. David Sandinsky, senior associate at NBBJ co-presented with Marne Zahner, design engineer at Magnusson Klemencic Associates. They talked about the Amazon domes—more specifically, the conjoined Catalan spheres and their structural steel modules. Session two focused on models, methods, and materials for optimizing facade performance. Energy strategist and consultant Sangeetha Divakar at Perkins+Will presented workplan models for integrating engineers' and architects' work in energy and envelope modeling. Stéphane Hoffman, building specialist at Morrison Hershfield, discussed parametric visualization tools for mapping building energy performance and why architects and engineers should track thermal bridging. Richard Green, Principal at Front, Inc talked about custom fabrication and digital manufacturing. In the final session, Devin Kleiner, Perkins+Will architect, Peter Alspach, principal of environmental and building physics at Arup, and Daniel Brindisi, associate at ZGF Architects, spoke to the real-world effects of facade technology. Kleiner discussed post occupancy lighting evaluations, Alspach presented data on the cost benefits of the carbon life cycle, and Brindisi talked about his firms efforts to maximize daylighting. In the L.A. area or planning a trip to Southern California at the end of January? Catch the latest building envelope developments at the Facades+ Symposium and Workshops in Los Angeles, January 28th and 29th.
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November 11> Sustainability, Innovation, and More at Facades+ AM Seattle

As AEC professionals who have practiced in different cities know, each place has its own unique architectural culture. That is one of the lessons Mic Patterson, VP of Strategic Development at Enclos, has learned during his years of involvement with the Facades+ conference series. “Instead of holding one annual conference, we’ve been doing three a year in different cities,” said Patterson. “My observation is that each of those has been different.” The newest event in the Facades+ stable, Facades+ AM, was inspired in part by a desire to bring the conversation about high performance facade design to more locales. The inaugural Facades+ AM four-hour program takes place next week in Seattle. “Everywhere makes sense to talk about building envelopes,” said Kerry Hegedus, architect at NBBJ and seminar chair of Facades+ AM Seattle. At the same time, he added, “in Seattle, we have a great architectural community that can be very experimental and, most importantly, aspirational. We need a forum like this to share these thoughts and developments.” A prime example of the seaport city’s aspirational architecture is the Bullitt Center, the subject of one of three panels at Facades+AM Seattle. Designed by Miller Hull and often referred to as “the greenest office building in the world,” the Bullitt Center embodies a no-holds-barred approach to sustainable design. “The Bullitt Foundation is that missing link the profession needs to evolve to a new, higher density, sustainable future,” said Hegedus. “We will find, I suspect, that this is not just a skin, but an integral part of the strategy of how this living building became a success. We need to build on this project’s great success.” But while some of the Facades+ AM program next week will be specific to Seattle, much of the discussion will hold value for designers and builders working in different contexts. More importantly, the lack of a script makes way for spontaneous, collaborative problem-solving. Speaking of another panel, on innovations in facade design and construction, Hegedus observed: “The beauty of this format, with this wildcard ‘Facade Futures,’ is that we don’t know what is going to come out of this.” To learn more about Facades+ AM or to register, visit the event website.
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Coming Soon to Seattle: Facades+ AM

Despite the fact that most state licensing boards require registered architects to pursue continuing education, not all AEC professionals take full advantage of the educational opportunities available. That’s a shame, says Mic Patterson, VP of Strategic Development for Enclos, given the value of the many workshops, seminar programs, and conferences aimed at practicing architects. The Facades+ conference series, co-sponsored by Enclos and AN, is one such offering. “The intent was to start a dialog involving the building skin that bridged the various fragmented sectors of the building industry,” said Patterson. “We’ve been very successful in doing that. Now I’m interested in taking this dialog to other locations.” Accordingly, Facades+ will launch a new initiative next month: Facades+ AM, a half-day forum debuting in Seattle on November 11. “Skin in the Game: Seattle 9-for-19” distills the best of the Facades+ 2-day conference into a four-hour event including nine 19-minute TED-talk-style presentations by the movers and shakers of building envelope design and construction. The speakers, who include Kjell Anderson, Architect and Sustainability Coordinator for LMN Architects, Perkins+Will’s Carsten Stein, Miller Hull principal Brian Court, and Brad Liljequist, Technical Director for the Living Building Challenge, are grouped into three themed sessions. “Biting the Bullitt: Facade Futures and Living Buildings” will take Seattle’s own Bullitt Center as its focus, while “Facades Futures: Drivers, Innovations, Integrations, and Renovations” will examine dominant trends in facade technology. The third session, “Bright Lights Big City: Daylight and Glare in the Urban Environment,” will explore the challenge of balancing competing concerns in designing energy-efficient skins. In addition to participating in the Q&A period following each panel, Facades+ AM attendees will have the opportunity to network with speakers and fellow audience members at a continental breakfast and mid-morning networking break. To learn more, or to register for Facades+ AM’s Seattle premiere, visit the event website.