Posts tagged with "Ezra Stoller":

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See Frank Lloyd Wright in three places this June

At three places this June, New Yorkers will have the opportunity to see Frank Lloyd Wright's work, and a bit of the man himself. New York's Yossi Milo Gallery is presenting Ezra Stoller's images of Wright's most iconic buildings on the 150th anniversary of his birth. Stoller, a master chronicler of modern architecture who died in 2004, first photographed Frank Lloyd Wright's schools in Spring Green, Wisconsin and Scottsdale, Arizona in 1945. Black-and-white images of Taliesin and Taliesin West (the summer and winter campuses, respectively) will share wall space alongside prints of the Marin County Civic Center, the SC Johnson Research Tower, Fallingwater, and the Guggenheim, just uptown. That exhibition, aptly named Ezra Stoller Photographs Frank Lloyd Wright Architecture, opens June 29 and runs through the end of the summer. Over at MoMA, curators are set to unveil a new anthology-style show that will address Wright's multiple practices as an architect, designer, builder, and thinker. Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive divides itself into 12 sections, each devoted to a selection of objects from the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives. These items, from the 1890s through the 1950s, will be displayed alongside objects from the MoMA and other collections. Unpacking the Archive opens June 12 and is organized in collaboration with Columbia University's Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library. But wait, there's more: the Guggenheim Museum is celebrating Wright's birthday on June 8 with, among other things, reduced-price admission for all visitors and an actor/historian playing Wright who will blow out birthday candles in the rotunda.
Ezra Stoller Photographs Frank Lloyd Wright Architecture is on view at Yossi Milo Gallery from June 29 through August 25. More information can be found on the gallery's websiteFrank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive runs from June 12 through October 1 at MoMA, with hours and additional programming information at moma.orgFrank Lloyd Wright 150th Birthday Celebration will be held on June 8 at the Guggenheim, and the fête's full schedule is here.
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Rudolph’s Walker Guest House replicated at the Ringling Museum of Art

It's no Palace of Versailles, but the Sarasota Architectural Foundation (SAF) has reproduced Paul Rudolph's 1952 Walker Guest House on the grounds of the Ringling Museum of Art. Using Rudolph's plans and Ezra Stoller's interior photographs, the foundation commissioned a faithful replica, down to the magazines on the coffee table. The replica will cost SAF approximately $150,000. It will be faithful to the original, minus the bathroom, which will be supplanted by a wheelchair-accessible ramp. The house will welcome visitors starting November 6th, part of opening festivities for SAF's SarasotaMOD Weekend. The original Walker Guest House is a 24-foot-by-24-foot foot structure constructed from "off the shelf" materials for the Walker family on Sanibel Island, off the Gulf Coast. The house still stands. Why build a replica? As SAF board member Dan Snyder explained, unlike other cities tearing Rudolph's architecture down, Sarasota is a "city that loves Rudolph." The Walker Guest House is privately owned, and Sanibel Island is only accessible via boat. The Ringling has 250,000 annual visitors, so having the replica house on its grounds will introduce Rudolph's work, and the Sarasota School of Architecture, to a wider audience. Indigenous to Florida's west coast, the Sarasota School melded the international style with the organic school of Frank Lloyd Wright while responding to the demands of a subtropical climate. The Walker Guest house, Snyder noted, "blurs the distinction between inside and outside, stealing space from the outside so the house seems much larger." The house is calibrated to respond to the seasons. Its three, eight-foot-by-eight-foot panels are flanked by retractable exterior shades that shield the house from excessive summer sun, but allow light to penetrate in the winter, when the temperature drops into the 60s. Its exoskeleton functions as a wraparound porch and a support system for the pulleys, weighted with red concrete balls, that control the shades. Members of the SAF visited the original house to document the interior and exterior for the replica project. To many, "1950s Florida" means tacky pastels and a flock of lawn flamingos. In contrast (or perhaps in protest), Rudolph's interior color palette is subdued grey to "draw [your] eye to the outside," Snyder explained. Referencing Stoller's photographs, the Rudolph-designed coffee table, dining table, bookcase, and sofa were reproduced. Queens-based furniture designer Richard Wrightman was commissioned to recreate the living room's officer's chairs. Adhering strictly to their standards of authenticity, the team purchased Time, Fortune, and Playboy magazines from 1953, and placed them as they appear in Stoller's images. A parallel exhibition, Paul Rudolph: The Guest Houses, at the Ringling features photographs, models, drawings, and writings. The exhibition runs through December 6th.
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A Stroll Through Modernism with Ezra Stoller

An exhibition of architectural photographer Ezra Stoller’s work will open at the Yossi Milo Gallery tonight in New York and runs through February 12. A few of the photos are instantly recognizable, such as a photo of the Guggenheim lobby featuring women in pillbox hats standing in the foreground. But the gems of the show are those taken off the beaten path, like the roof of the Seagram’s Building or a parking garage in Miami. “We see it as a mini-retrospective,” said Milo. “We wanted to show more than the slam-dunk photos, to give it more depth.” The images show not only Stoller’s precise technical ability, but also reveal the self-effacing nature of architectural photography: that of an artist recording work of another artist. But the depth of Stoller’s appreciation for art and design makes it easy to forget that one is looking at a stand alone work of art. Not only is the genius of Mies, Wright and Saarinen observed, but the works of Picasso, Kandinsky, and Miro peer out from building interiors as well. The artworks act as a magnet, pulling the viewer further in. In a single shot of a Seagram interior one of Rothko’s “Red” paintings hangs next to the next to an Eames sofa which sits across from a Franz Kline. “These were such new ideas. Now people sit with an iPhone and think that’s modern,” Milo said gesturing to the photograph. The gallery owner noted that some photos that didn’t make it into the show revealed the photographer’s intense interest in the building process. “There are photos from the beginning of when the U.N. was being built. He kept going back and going back,” he said. The images show buildings shot at all times of day and in all kinds of weather, taken at night, in the rain, after the rain, or, as in one photo of Saarinen’s TWA terminal, as a lightning storm approaches. That particular silver print holds varying tones of white within the building interior, while simultaneously retaining all the grays and blacks of the approaching storm.