Posts tagged with "Exhibitions":

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On View> Pedro E. Guerrero: A Retrospective

Pedro E. Guerrero: A Retrospective WUHO Gallery 6518 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles Through April 25 At age 22, Pedro E. Guerrero made a spontaneous visit to Taliesin West to meet Frank Lloyd Wright; upon seeing his portfolio Wright immediately gave Guerrero the position of principal photographer. Guerrero’s relationship with Wright would define his career; nearly all publications about Wright include his work. Moving to New York, Guerrero went on to work for journals including Architectural Record and Vogue, documenting the works of modernists like Saarinen and Breuer. His photography approaches architecture as sculpture, displaying an eye for composition and form that led to close personal and working relationships with Alexander Calder and Louise Nevelson.
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Exhibition Explores the Inner Workings of Proposed Low Line Park

Let There Be Light: Low Line Exhibit Mark Miller Gallery 92 Orchard Street Through April 29th, 12-6pm The team of innovators continues to push forward with a proposal for the Delancey Underground, transforming an underground trolley terminal into a public park for Manhattan’s Lower East Side. An exhibit detailing the proposal for the so-called “Low Line” will be running throughout April at the Mark Miller Gallery. The show entitled Let There Be Light was organized by Delancey Underground co-founders James Ramsey and Dan Barasch in an effort to engage the public directly with the ideas and innovations underpinning the project. The design seeks to reclaim the abandoned Williamsburg Trolley Terminal beneath Delancey Street, transforming the derelict space with the use of innovative solar reflectors and fiber optic cables into a sunlit subterranean park teeming with plant life. The show offers an opportunity to examine in close detail this elegant solar technology as well as early design prototypes, sketches and 3-D renderings of the proposal. Visitors are also encouraged to provide comments and suggestions for the scheme which will be reviewed by the designers as the project progresses. The month long display is part of a larger effort to move the design forward, the next key stage of which will be a full-scale installation of a segment of the park at the Essex Street Market to be completed in September. This will allow the community to inhabit and experience the park as it may some day feel. The proposition is an admirable and earnest reuse of the city’s urban infrastructure and an unexampled way of considering public space. Initiatives such as this may help maintain enthusiasm and momentum for the project among supporters and continue the public dialogue. Editor’s note: A Kickstarter campaign to build a demonstration segment of the Low Line has entered the final stretch with only a few hours left to contribute to the project, which has already substantially exceeded its goal of $100,000.
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Addressing Water Scarcity at A+D

Last Thursday, we visited the opening of the A+D Museum's new show, Drylands Design. While politicians squabble about oil and other resources, the show drives home the point that water is the reserve that will become the most fraught in the future as populations increase and climate change worsens. The Arid Lands Institute at Woodbury University culled the exhibit from the winners of their Drylands Design Competition, which encouraged architects, engineers, and urban designers to respond to the challenges of coming water scarcity. While some were a bit too complex for the average museum-goer, most proposals could improve aesthetics and quality of life while also addressing water issues. Professional Honor Merit Award Winner, Tom Kasbau, proposed re-introducing "vernal pools," nutrient-rich wetlands, along the LA River corridor and near freeway underpasses and other infrastructure. Solar panels along such infrastructure (i.e. the river's banks) would power desalinization systems, returning freshwater into the city's reservoirs and into adjacent farms. Student Honor Merit Award winner Rebecca Lederer proposed "New Man's Land," a system of wetlands, treatment facilities, riparian community spaces, and groundwater wells along the length of the US-Mexico Border. The focus will be on 14 "sister cities" along the border, which would share water resources and, just as important, create a sense of community across the international divide. To see more of these proposals visit here or better still go to the A+D Museum before the show closes on April 26.
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On View> 1976: Movies, Photographs and Related Works on Paper

1976: Movies, Photographs and Related Works on Paper Paul Kasmin Gallery 515 West 27th St. Through February 11 British-born James Nares has lived in New York since the mid-1970s, when Lower Manhattan was “a beautiful ruin,” according to the artist. While most celebrated for his large, single-stroke kinetic paintings, the artist has a long track record of documenting his fascination with movement and bodies in motion dating back to the days when he delved into many other media such as films and chronophotographs. The exhibition features five films including Pendulum (1976), in which Nares clocks a large spherical mass swinging from a footbridge, against the industrial backdrop of downtown Manhattan—evocative of the foreboding, dreamlike qualities also seen in Giorgio de Chirico’s surreal paintings.
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On View> Gwathmey Siegel at the Yale School of Architecture

Gwathmey Siegel: Inspiration and Transformation Yale School of Architecture Gallery New Haven Through January 2012 The first show to present the work of Gwathmey Siegel and Associates, Inspiration and Transformation at the Yale School of Architecture explores the connection between architecture and art over eight firm projects. Those selected are a diverse group, represented by a range of mediums that include sketches, blueprints, models, photographs (of the de Menil House, above), and drawings, and personal documents. But the emphasis falls on the firm’s institutional work: the renovations and additions to Yale School of Architecture’s Paul Rudolph Hall; the Guggenheim Museum annex and renovation, the renovation of Whig Hall at Princeton, and the Busch Reisinger addition to the Fogg Museum at Harvard University. Also on display are pieces of Gwathmey’s personal archive, Europe travel sketchbooks, and student work at Yale.
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On View> Cooper-Hewitt on Designing Lasting Solutions with the Other 90%

For a long time in the West there has been a common misgiving that aid is about patronage. The Cooper Hewitt's latest exhibition, Design with the Other 90% : Cities, which opened this weekend at the United Nations Visitor's Center, rebukes this notion by spotlighting communities in the southern hemisphere who are taking the initiative, harnessing local resources to solve their own problems. In the show, designers and architects are tapping into existing currents of change. The clue is in the title, which follows on from the 2007 show Design for the Other 90%, which charted products and work that has been imported into impoverished communities. This latest exhibition—focusing on cities—presents a broad spectrum of solutions to critical issues of sanitation, space, communications, and infrastructure. Sixty featured projects were divided into six sections—Exchange, Reveal, Adapt, Include, Prosper, and Access. The projects were selected primarily for their success, which curator Cynthia Smith puts down to qualities of scalability, transferability, applicability in other locations as well as their positive impact. "What's interesting about so many of these projects is there's real application to what's currently happening," said Smith. She cites Urban Think Tank's Vertical Gym as one example. Intended to mark out a safe public space in a dense urban location, the gym has been designed as a kit of parts so it can be programmed and adapted to the site. The Venezuela-based project has been transformed into proposals for New York City public schools, as well as areas in the Netherlands and the Middle East. While all the ideas are site-specific and responsive to local geography, culture, and scale among other factors, the exhibition also features organizations such as Shack/Slum Dwellers International, which is practicing a horizontal exchange and offering a set of design tools that can be applied to problems in various countries, climates, and situations. "The scale of these problems is growing so rapidly that regional and local municipalities can't keep up with the growth, so you get cross-collaborations," said Smith. "The most interesting designs are the hybrid solutions, where the informal settlements and the formal city meet." Because there has been a dearth of information about this kind of design, Smith says that professors were using the last show's catalogue as a text book, so for this next installment, Cooper Hewitt has developed what they consider to be a tool for the next generation of designers. "We are looking at who is addressing these issues," she said. The Design for the Other 90% now has a social network where designers can upload projects and exchange ideas. The statistics are staggering: one billion people are living in informal settlements around the world, and it's projected that this number will increase to two billion by 2030. These facts are much more powerful when one is exposed to the physical artifacts that are the design solutions: bio-latrines that transform human waste into fertilizer and gas for cooking in Nairobi, floating schools and health clinics in flood-prone Bangladesh; favelas painted with women's faces in Rio, and plastic formwork systems that allow the unskilled to build houses in a day in South Africa. The innovations are astonishing. It is easy to produce a self-congratulatory exhibition about how design can help poorer communities around the world, but Cooper Hewitt's new exhibition demonstrates that approach is moot: these communities are already in the process of redesigning themselves.
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Buildings=Energy exhibit to kickstart Archtober!

In New York City, buildings account for almost 80 percent of greenhouse gas emissions and 95 percent of electricity use. It was these facts like these that prompted the Center for Architecture to further investigate the urban energy crisis and display the findings--and potential solutions--in an exhibit entitled Buildings=Energy. The exhibit, which opens on the evening of October 1st, explores how important choices made by designers, planners, architects, and building occupants can positively affect energy consumption in our cities. One such example featured in the exhibition is a model building designed by the firm Perkins+Will, whose proposal demonstrates the significance of site planning, materials, programs and their affects on energy costs. For instance, as firm principal Anthony Fieldman explains, tilting the exterior glass by only 10 degrees towards the street prevents a substantial amount of solar heat gains, saving the building on cooling costs throughout the summer months. Other highlights of the exhibit can be viewed from the sidewalk. The attention of passersby on LaGuardia Place will be caught by a display of nine building materials suspended in the Center's window, each representing the embodied energy of one gallon of oil--just a preview of the striking visuals on view inside. The Center for Architecture's kick off-event is presented as part of Archtober, the inaugural month-long festival of architecture activities, programs, and exhibitions in New York City.
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On View> Ceci N'est Pas Une Reverie: The Architecture of Stanley Tigerman

Ceci n’est pas une reverie: The Architecture of Stanley Tigerman Yale School of Architecture 180 York Street New Haven, CT Through November 4 The exhibition Ceci n’est pas une reverie (“This is not a dream”) celebrates the work of architect Stanley Tigerman. Curated by Yale School of Architecture Associate Professor Emmanuel Petit, this retrospective tells the story of Tigerman’s professional career, beginning with his years at Yale as an undergraduate and then a graduate student in architecture. Organized around several motifs—utopia, allegory, death, humor, and division—the exhibition includes models and objects, documents, cartoons, sketches, and drawings, like an axonometric of formica, above. Video material from lectures and interviews also capture Tigerman’s eclectic style as it has evolved over the past 50 years, encompassing his early work at the Chicago-based firm Tigerman McCurry Architects and his return to Yale as a visiting professor. Ceci n’est pas une reverie will coincide with the publication of Tigerman’s collected writings, 1964-2011 Schlepping Through Ambivalence, Essays on an American Architectural Condition, and his autobiography Designing Bridges to Burn as well as a series of lectures at the Yale School of Architecture.
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"Architecture of Consequence" Opens in San Francisco

Last night, the AIA SF launched a new exhibition, Architecture of Consequence: San Francisco, kicking off a whole slew of events in its annual Architecture in the City Festival, the country's biggest such celebration of the built environment. The exhibit explores important social needs that architects can address and features the work of four San Francisco firms—Iwamoto Scott Architecture, Fletcher Studio, SOM, and Envelope A+D—side-by-side with four Dutch firms—Van Bergen Kolpa Architecten, 2012 Architecten, ZUS (Zones Humaines Sensibles), and OMA. Originally conceived by the Netherlands Architecture Institute in 2009, this spin-off of the internationally touring exhibit shows that similar preoccupations are on the minds of architects everywhere—whether it's renewable energy, adaptive reuse, local food production, or thoughtful urban infill. David Fletcher gave the whole exhibit a major boost of local flava with Beta-Bridge (above), "a radical reinvention and reuse of the soon-to-be-demolished eastern span of the existing Bay Bridge." He proposed to load the upper deck of the bridge with medical cannabis greenhouses and the lower deck with a data farm; the water used to irrigate the cannabis plants would circulate down and cool off the chugging servers. On the other end of the scale, OMA revisualized the world in terms of energy. In lieu of standard geopolitical boundaries, it divided the European continent into areas such as Biomassburg, Carbon Capture and Storage Republic (CCSR), and Solaria. The exhibition continues through October 21, and each of the San Francisco firms has been paired up with a Dutch firm to give a discussion about their shared interest over the course of the month (see schedule of talks). The Architecture and the City Festival runs through the end of the month, with in-depth tours of new projects such as Bar Agricole (September 10), the ever-popular Home Tours (September 17-18), and a unique opportunity to experience what it's like to navigate the city without sight ("Acoustic Wayfinding for the Blind," (September 20) led by architect Chris Downey, who talked about losing his sight in a 2010 issue of AN). Check out the full calendar of events.
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On View> Tim Burton Descends on LACMA

Tim Burton Los Angeles County Museum of Art Los Angeles Through October 31 Best known for directing films like The Nightmare Before Christmas, Edward Scissorhands, Batman Returns, and Beetle Juice, Tim Burton and his work as an illustrator, writer, and artist are being honored with a retrospective at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. This new show celebrates the way that Burton has managed to put his own spin on movies in an industry known for its fear of the unknown. With over 700 items on display, including drawings, paintings, photographs, film and video works, storyboards, puppets, concept artworks, maquettes, costumes, and assorted cinematic ephemera, visitors get a glimpse into the mind of this modern day Renaissance man. Though the show debuted on the east coast at New York’s Museum of Modern Art, the LACMA version of the show, organized by Britt Salvesen, offers its own take on the Burbank native’s body of work. Burton collaborated with the exhibition designers to transform the museum’s Resnick Pavilion into an appropriately “Burtonesque” environment. He also created several new pieces for the exhibition, including what the museum describes as a “revolving multimedia, black-light carousel installation that hangs from the ceiling.”
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On View> Material Landscapes in St. Louis

Seemingly sliced into the asphalt of a Brooklyn street beneath the Manhattan Bridge is an unexpected glass-filled "tattoo" designed by landscape architect Paula Meijerink, founder of Boston-based WANTED Landscape. Meijerink is among eight landscape architects featured in Material Landscapes, a recently opened exhibition at the Sheldon Art Galleries in St. Louis running through January 21st, 2012. Work from the eight firms including D.I.R.T  studio, dlandstudio, Stoss Landscape Urbanism, Legge Lewis Legge, PEG office, Kaseman Beckman Advanced Strategies, and ESKYIU is presented in photographs and drawings. Curator Liane Hancock, senior lecturer at Washington University in St. Louis, chose projects ranging from a vertical container garden in Hong Kong to a waterfront in Milwaukee to reflect innovative use of materials in landscape architecture and to advance landscape design in St. Louis in light of major projects such as Citygarden and the redevelopment of the St. Louis Arch grounds.
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Guggenheim′s Newest Exhibit to Offer Therapy

The stereotypes of New Yorkers are that they're rude, they only wear black, and they all have therapists. Sanitorium, the first installation of Guggenheim's new program, stillspotting nyc, explores the smorgasborg of therapies that help the city's neurotic residents keep their lives together. The installation is one of many that will take place over the next two years as a part of stillspotting nyc, which explores stillness and quiet in the hectic city. The program enlists architects, designers and composers to transform "still spots" into public tours, events and installations every three to five months. For the first installation, Artist Pedro Reyes transforms the storefront level of One MetroTech in downtown Brooklyn into a temporary clinic in early June. According to the Guggenheim:
In two-hour windows, Sanatorium visitors experience up to three sessions from over a dozen options through meetings with a series of “therapists.” Balancing reality and parody, Sanatorium draws from Gestalt psychology, theater warm-up exercises, Fluxus events, conflict resolution techniques, trust-building games, corporate coaching, psychodrama, and hypnosis.
The sessions include Ex-Voto, in which visitors express thanks for a blessing, which an artist will then render into a small painting; Epitaphs, in which a therapist will facilitate the inscription of one’s tombstone; and Gong Pavilion, in which vibrations from nearby gongs are applied to acupuncture points. The venue, a 23-story skyscraper in Brooklyn and former home to Bear Stearns and Keyspan Energy, may strike some as an odd choice for the Guggenheim, but the program is part of a trend to move the museum's Architecture and Urban Studies programming into the city, as is increasingly apparent with BMW Guggenheim Labs and FutureFarmers, which included events at the Gowanus Canal, in the East Village and other offbeat locations.