Posts tagged with "Exhibitions":

CANactions International Architecture Festival 2019

CANactions is an educational platform, aimed to enhance the creation of places and communities where people love to live and work. CANactions integrates the most relevant world experience in the sphere of architecture and urbanism to educate and inspire responsibility active change makers. For this moment CANactions is a member of Future Architecture Platform CANactions International Architecture Festival — the largest architectural event in Ukraine, runs annually since 2008. This year, the 12th CANactions International Architecture Festival will be focused on an exploration of a notion of "Hromada" — Ukrainian name for the Community, which is embedded into the country's historic and cultural codes and reflected in contemporary social movements and architectural forms. CANactions will explore "Hromada" as a social and spatial phenomenon and reveal this topic in a global context at the Festival. Do not miss two days of lectures, exhibitions, master-classes, talks, discussions, films at CANactions Festival 2019. With the key-speeches provided by well-known international experts, current exhibitions, workshops, and film screenings, we aim to create the conditions for sharing ideas and dialogue in the sphere of modern architecture and urban development. Among keynote speakers are: - Reinier de Graaf / OMA, NL - Cino Zucchi / CZA-Cino Zucchi Architetti, IT - Yana Golubeva / MLA+ , RU - Stephan Sigrist/ ETH Zürich, W.I.R.E., CH - Jord den Hollander / AFFR, NL -  Grisha Zotov / Architectural Prescription, CANactions School, NL - Viktor Zotov / ZOTOV&CO, CANactions, UA and others. Together with -Crimson Architectural Historians -CANactions School The venue of the Festival 2019 is one of the most interesting and beautiful spots of Kiyv - KyivRiverport - great industrial space along the Great Dnipro River. Early bird tickets canactions2019.ticketforevent.com/en For more information please visit the Festival website http://festival.canactions.com/en CAN - ACT
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Heidi Bucher’s latex casts of spaces are coming to New York

What if instead of photographing your home to remember its significance in your life, you recreated its walls, windows, and doors by casting them in liquid latex? That’s quite the committed way of capturing the space of life, but one that could also produce a more tangible record of space. The seminal Swiss sculptor and performance artist Heidi Bucher did just that in the mid-1970s and '80s. Late in her career, she discovered a new, experimental artform of  “skinning” spaces by pressing gauze against the surface of a building or object, spreading latex on top of it, and then peeling off the cast with all her might. A survey of these monumental pieces, which have been pristinely kept by her family, will be on view in the new exhibition, Heidi Bucher: The Site of Memory, at the Lehmann Maupin Gallery in New York from April 29 to June 15. Viewers will be able to see up-close and personal the details and textures that Bucher was able to capture. Featuring Bucher’s most iconic sculptures, like Borg from 1976, a piece molded on the entire cellar of her studio, the exhibition will provide insights into the artist’s intensive latex casting method and the lengths that she would go to record spaces. Also included will be works shown for the first time in the United States like Untitled (Door to the Herrenzimmer) from 1978, a sculpture that, like much of Bucher’s work, takes on an ethereal quality thanks to the mother-of-pearl she pasted over her pieces to create an iridescent sheen. Though her projects have naturally browned over time, such touches gave helped them maintain an aura of elusive depth. “I don’t think she was trying to be super precious with these materials,” said Anna Stothart, curatorial director of Lehmann Maupin. “For her, these skins had certain layers of beauty but were also meant to express the specific personal, social, and historic memories held in these architectural spaces. You can even see the residue of the paint pulled from the surface of whatever she was casting.” Bucher’s work was clearly indicative of a literal place and time in her own life, but it also had a larger, cultural meaning. According to Stothart, she was investigating the physical boundaries between the human body and the domestic environments in which women, in particular, were often confined to. The pieces shown in the exhibition center around the period when Bucher returned to a politically-charged Zurich after living in more progressive cities within the U.S. and Canada with her husband, who was a more traditional sculptor. After divorcing him, she began exploring more abstract forms of sculpture as well as feminist ideas like what it means to “take up space,” both in public and in private, as a Swiss woman. She primarily molded women’s clothing at first, which according to the exhibition description “both signified her interest in metamorphosis and served as a critical response to the rigid gender restrictions she experienced growing up.” By the time she started casting large-scale architectural structures, such as entire rooms, the concept turned into a personal and cultural commentary on removing oneself from the patriarchal past. “She would literally pull the molds off the wall using her whole body,” said Stothart. “The material is strong and she wasn’t worried about the end result being perfect, or even conserving it. I’d say she didn’t want a piece to be an exact replica of space, but the memory of it, a ghost of it.”  Heidi Bucher: The Site of Memory opens at Lehmann Maupin at 501 West 24th Street, New York on April 29. A series of videos filmed by Bucher and her sons, Mayo and Indigo Bucher, will accompany the work, unveiling the poetic ways in which the artist spoke about her process and works.
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Wende Museum pairs Shepard Fairey and Soviet propaganda posters

Crumbling Empire, an exhibition combining dozens of Soviet-era political posters with works by American street artist Shepard Fairey, is currently on view at the Cold War–centric Wende Museum in Los Angeles.

The Soviet political paintings were recently acquired by the Wende from local collectors Tom and Jeri Ferris, two Americans who traveled regularly to the Soviet Union during the 1980s to collect works of contemporary art. The colorful and subversive works, produced during Mikhail Gorbachev’s outward-looking tenure, present critical takes on the waning years of the Soviet empire.

Fairey’s graphics and illustrations present contemporary foils to the posters while touching on similar themes. Also included in the exhibition is the central panel from Vitaly Komar and Alexander Melamid’s monumental 1993 work Unity, a portion of a large mural created by the Sots Art artists for the lobby of the U.S. Bank tower in Los Angeles. The exhibition also includes works from the American Institute of Graphic Arts, San Diego’s Ron Miriello Soviet Poster Show Collection.

Crumbling Empire: The Power of Dissident Voices The Wende Museum 10808 Culver Boulevard Culver City, CA Through June 2
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Theaster Gates, MASS Design Group among list of Chicago Architecture Biennial contributors

Theaster Gates, MASS Design Group, Wolff Architects, as well as Forensic Architecture and Invisible Institute are among the first wave of contributors announced for this fall’s 2019 Chicago Architecture Biennial. The show, titled ...and other such storieswill be an expansive look into global projects that delve into how architecture relates to land, memory, rights, and civic participation. The initial list of participants, announced last week, features 51 artists, collectives, architects, and researches from 19 countries—only half of the soon-to-be full lineup of participants. According to Biennial Board Chairman Jack Guthman, the international showcase will have something for everyone, designers and Chicagoans alike. “The participants who will explore the significant issues raised by our curators will both challenge and entertain the Biennial’s audiences,” he said. Artistic Director Yesomi Umolu noted the broad range of contributors have backgrounds and projects that “resonate deeply” with the four curatorial areas previously laid out by the organization: “No Land Beyond,” “Appearances and Erasures,” “Rights and Reclamations,” and “Common Ground.” Capetown-based firm Wolff Architects, as well as local Chicago artist Theaster Gates, will present “reflections on landscapes of belonging,” while CAMP from Mumbai and New York’s Center for Spatial Research will uncover the political controversies behind contested spaces of memory. RMA Architects and DAAR, the studio helmed by Sandi Hilal and Alessandro Petti, will think about how architecture can act as a site of advocacy. Lastly, Construct Lab from Berlin and Adrian Blackwell of Toronto will “explore methodologies for intervening” in public space. Works on these topics and more will allow visitors the chance to interpret their own opinions about the ways in which architects advances or inhibits global stories of culture and history. The projects will be placed in the main exhibition at the Chicago Architecture Biennial, housed in the Chicago Cultural Center. The programming also includes broader, city-wide events and talks. You can read the full list of initial participants here.

Drawing Codes: Experimental Protocols of Architectural Representation, Volume II

​Presented by University of Virginia School of Architecture and California College of the Arts / Digital Craft Lab Curated by Andrew Kudless and Adam Marcus Emerging technologies of design and production have opened up new ways to engage with traditional practices of architectural drawing. This exhibition, the second volume in a series organized by the CCA Digital Craft Lab, features experimental drawings by architects who explore the impact of new technologies on the relationship between code and drawing: how rules and constraints inform the ways we document, analyze, represent, and design the built environment. Participants: Benjamin Aranda & Chris Lasch; Bradley Cantrell & Emma Mendel; Sean Canty; Madeline Gannon; Howeler + Yoon; MARC FORNES / THEVERYMANY; Ibañez Kim; IwamotoScott Architecture; Stephanie Lin; V. Mitch McEwen; MILLIØNS (Zeina Koreitem & John May); Nicholas de Monchaux and Kathryn Moll; MOS (Michael Meredith & Hilary Sample); Catie Newell; Tsz Yan Ng; William O’Brien Jr.; Outpost Office; Heather Roberge; Jenny Sabin; SPORTS; John Szot; T+E+A+M; Nader Tehrani; Maria Yablonina Curator Talk and Panel Discussion: Monday March, 25 at 12:00pm, Campbell Hall 153​
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Artist Leslie Wayne reveals What’s Inside her inner world

A new exhibition by New York–based artist Leslie Wayne explores everyday spaces and how, through alternative modes of representation, we can see those environments in a deeper light. What’s Inside, now on view at New York City's Jack Shainman Gallery through March 30, features Wayne’s newest collection of paintings that detail basic domestic scenes like messy closets, busy bookshelves, and broken windows. These disheveled objects evoke a German Expressionist perspective, according to the artist, and unveil Wayne’s political and personal anxieties through singular depictions of an inner world that’s “not quite right,” but can be fixed. AN spoke with Wayne via email about the layered inspiration behind What’s Inside, and how color, both in architecture and in painting, can manipulate the emotions of its viewers. She also explains why studying art that highlights buildings or interior design can ultimately strengthen a person’s appreciation for the built environment. The Architect's Newspaper: Your current collection seems to build off your previous window pieces for Free Experience. Can you explain why you decided to continue that project and how this show takes those previous themes to another level? Leslie Wayne: As an abstract artist, my whole career, I’ve been wanting to bring representation into my work, but I didn’t quite know how it would manifest itself given the idiosyncratic way I use paint. Those first window paintings gave me a way to do that. Conceptually, they allowed me to express my feelings and ideas about the world around me, about the current state of affairs, as well as my own personal life, by using domestic architectural forms as a motif and as a kind of organizing principle. I realized that my abstract paintings always kept you on a threshold—of what was visible, and what was beneath and behind the surface that you could never quite completely see or understand. Architectural thresholds can operate in much the same way. By making a painting of a doorway that is just barely cracked open, or a window that is boarded up, I’m keeping you on that threshold. So actually, I’m still exploring the same thing, only in a more pictorial way.    AN: Why did you choose to focus on normal interior objects and spaces? What draws you to imagining these details in a new way? LW: I’m drawing largely on my immediate surroundings—the armoire in my bedroom, the tool chest in my husband’s studio, and my bookshelves. While the forms as furniture are universal, their contents are autobiographical, and they tell you a lot about what makes up my life. In the beginning, the idea of creating a painting of a closet was just a response to my need to move on from an earlier body of work. But then the idea of closets became more interesting to me as types of containers. Containers, not just of clothing and everyday objects, but of things we hold dear, or secrets we want to keep. And then came the paintings of drawers and bookshelves, containers that hold evidence of your life—books you’ve read, music you listen to, materials you use for work, etc. And on a purely formal level, closets, shelves, and window frames provide an interesting platform for different kinds of architectural motifs, which as a painter is great because it’s just an endless source of visual information. AN: Your work is very colorful and tactile. What do the different colors and the way those hues bring a tangible quality to your paintings say about these mundane architectural spaces you depict? LW: Color is loaded with emotive power, much the same way that music is. It can be used to express tremendously strong feelings, but, because of that, you’re in danger of being manipulative and clichéd if you go too far. It’s tricky. You want to seduce the viewer but not knock them over the head with it! Most people, when they’re thinking about architecture they’re thinking about the facade and the overall shape of a building or an architectural detail. They’re not considering the way in which a building is a container and a shelter and how the design and the color of an interior space can determine the way you feel when you go inside of it. We were in Mexico City recently and went to the house of Luis Barragán. It was very interesting to see how he used color to visually block out certain spaces and establish an overall feeling of a room. Yellow walls made you feel warm and welcomed, pink walls gave you a sensation of joy and anticipation. I loved that. For me, when I’m painting, I try to use color to do much the same thing, to convey a sensation. AN: Why is it valuable to look at architecture and interiors through the alternative lenses of painting or photography, rather than being in the space itself? LW: I would say that it’s valuable to look at architecture and interiors through the alternative lenses of painting or photography in addition to being in the space itself. There’s no substitute for having a direct experience of an architectural space. But I think we take those spaces for granted. And those of us in dense urban environments usually have our heads down (or buried in our cell phones!) when we’re walking rather than looking up and noticing what tremendously rich details are on buildings all around us. It’s valuable to reconsider what those spaces mean to us and art can take you there through the poetry of metaphor and illusion. If you’ve ever been taken by a Fra Angelico painting for example, like The Annunciation, then perhaps next time you’re inside a space that has vaulted ceilings you’ll be reminded of the painting and become aware of the ceiling’s elegance and structural integrity. Or a Dorothea Lange photograph of a young sharecropper’s log cabin can make you really feel what it must mean to live in a structure of such simplicity. Bernd and Hilla Becher spent their lives documenting industrial architecture and brought the simplest most overlooked structures, like water towers, into the realm of the sublime. We look at these things every day, but art helps us see them more deeply. See Wayne’s new show, What’s Inside, at the Jack Shainman Gallery at 513 West 20th Street, New York, New York.
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Architect Sarah Entwistle revives her late grandfather in New York exhibition

New York City’s new Signs and Symbols art gallery will present an autobiographical exhibition by British artist and architect Sarah Entwistle. The art installation, titled It may prove a mere accident that we met, or it may prove a necessity, explores the work of Sarah's late grandfather and troubled architect, Clive Entwistle, who died in 1976 before having met her. While Clive had once worked alongside Le Corbusier and was the lead designer of the original plan for Madison Square Garden, most of his projects were never completed. The exhibition stems from Clive’s only successful work, the Transportation and Travel Pavilion for New York’s 1964 World's Fair, and it revolves around an image of a staged trade fair interior that he designed. In order to recreate the vision of her late grandfather, as well as revitalize his architectural legacy, Sarah displays rich and varied artifacts from Clive’s most ambitious designs in a way that is reminiscent of a mise-en-scéne. Relics include ceramics, elaborate architectural models, furniture prototypes, intricate drawings, a large handwoven tapestry, and photographic portraits of women accompanied by extensive correspondences with lovers. Sarah received her late grandfather’s personal belongings in 2011, after they had been unearthed from a Manhattan storage room where they sat untouched for over 30 years. Before then, she had little knowledge of his legacy, as he was absent from her life. Through the project and exhibition, Sarah attempts to simultaneously revive and reinterpret her grandfather and his work, breathing new life into his biography by integrating it with her own. Sarah noted, “each action from within the archive cleaves me further from the gravitational pull of my grandfather’s complex legacy, with its meta-narrative of failure and erasure, towards a re-emergence, where that which has been consigned to the past is re-embodied and re-imagined.” Sarah Entwistle’s exhibition will open on March 3 at Signs and Symbols gallery in Manhattan’s Lower East Side. She is also developing a new installation for the Zevaco House in Casablanca, Morocco, in collaboration with curator Salma Lahlou.
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London’s Design Museum displays David Adjaye’s major memorial designs

A new exhibition at the Design Museum in London highlights David Adjaye’s evolving expertise in memorial design. Making Memory is on view through May 5 and showcases seven of his firm’s completed and ongoing commemorative projects. Presented in models, photographs, material samples, sculptures, and full-scale recreations of Adjaye Associates’ monumental works, the memorial projects detailed in the show cover over a decade of architectural practice. Three of the structures on view have already been built, while four are unbuilt. One installation is dedicated to the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C., and includes the West African Yoruba sculpture that inspired the building’s design. Another installation features a reconstruction of the Sclera Pavilion that Adjaye made for the 2008 London Design Festival, which he created in collaboration with the American Hardwood Export Council. Adjaye’s Gwangju River Reading Room, completed in 2013 and also featured in the exhibition, details his work with writer Taiye Selasi to create a pavilion in Gwangju, South Korea, dedicated to a pro-democracy uprising in May 1980 when several students were killed at the nearby Chonnam National University. A replica of the pavilion will be set up within the Design Museum complete with texts curated by Selasi. All of these built works, according to Adjaye, provide “an experience of time and place that is available to everyone.” The architect said in a statement that the 21st-century monument is no longer a singular representation of an event, but something that “is really used as a device to talk about the many things facing people across the planet” no matter the nation, race, or community the piece symbolizes. In his work, Adjaye seeks to create dynamic and complex spaces for people to interact with the triumphs and failures of history. Also detailed in the exhibit are Adjaye Associates' designs of the National Cathedral of Ghana in Accra, which was unveiled last March, and the Mass Extinction Memorial Observatory (MEMO), a spiraling stone structure currently under construction on the Isle of Portland in England. The show also features Adjaye’s recent competition entry for a new memorial in Boston honoring the legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr., and Coretta Scott King. It’s unclear whether Adjaye’s design has been chosen by the nonprofit in charge of the competition, King Boston, but an announcement is expected soon. The project is moving forward fairly quickly, having received major donations last month from the Boston Foundation and Boston University. One of Adjaye’s most well-known upcoming projects, the UK Holocaust Memorial and Learning Center in London, is discussed in the special exhibition in tandem with the current controversy surrounding its design and location in Victoria Tower Gardens. The design, a collaboration with Ron Arad Architects, was chosen in late 2017 as the winner of an international competition to memorialize the six million Jews murdered in the Holocaust. The project is facing new opposition from the site’s management group, Royal Parks, a London charity that says it doesn’t support the planning application and deems the Gardens “highly sensitive” to any physical alterations. The Guardian reported that Royal Parks supports the “principle of the project” but the size and design would have “harmful impacts” on the area—the Gardens fall within the boundaries of a UNESCO World Heritage Site that includes Westminster Abbey and the Houses of Parliament.
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New exhibition studies destruction and demolition in New York City and Appalachia

Destruction and Transformation: Vernacular Photography and the Built Environment at New York City’s Walther Collection, an art space featuring historical and contemporary photography, looks at what happens when buildings disappear. The exhibition will showcase 16 photographic series ranging from 1876 to 2000 that focus on building demolition, with a focus on two sites in particular: the Appalachian coalfields, where natural resource extraction has decimated the local landscape and ecology; and New York City, an urban environment dominated by cycles of cash-fueled construction and destruction. Although the exhibition will center on demolition, Destruction and Transformation will force visitors to confront the drastic and often harsh effects of modernization and urban expansion that come often at the expense of nature, history, and native populations. Rather than focus on a single photographer, the exhibition displays numerous documentary images taken in New York City over the course of a century, including Harvey F. Dutcher’s 1939 series depicting the gradual destruction of the Sixth Avenue Elevated Railroad, as well as an anonymous photographer’s meticulous survey of stores along Sixth Avenue, many of which have since disappeared. Destruction and Transformation will also include panoramic photos of evolving landscapes, including images of the construction of San Francisco, the famous Viaur Viaduct in Southern France, and the Sunset Strip in Los Angeles. Destruction and Transformation: Vernacular Photography and the Built Environment February 8–May 25, 2019 Walther Collection 526 West 26th Street, Suite 718 New York, N.Y. 10001
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The 2019 Chicago Architecture Biennial announces curatorial focus

The third edition of the Chicago Architecture Biennial is coming to the Midwest this fall with a curatorial vision by Artistic Director Yesomi Umolu and co-curators Sepake Angiama and Paulo Tavares. Under the theme ...and other such stories, the biennial will engage “multiple narratives from different geographies and histories” to spark conversation about a future for the field that is shared, diverse, sustainable, inclusive, and equitable. Centered around four areas of inquiry, the biennial will showcase a broad view of the industry while addressing the importance of space, architecture, and nature in connection to the practices of building, designing, planning, policymaking, teaching, and activism. The first focus, “No Land Beyond,” will feature projects inspired by an indigenous approach to nature, ecology, and landscape, while “Appearances and Erasures” will dive into designing monuments and memorials in response to shared and contested memories. “Rights and Reclamations” and “Common Ground” will explore civil rights and advocacy within the field with a particular concentration on affordable and equitable housing. The biennial will also draw from Chicago’s own urban development history, as well as the spatial and socio-economic conditions that have shaped it. By “moving beyond the grand narratives of the city’s architectural heritage,” the biennial will highlight the unique experiences of both architects and everyday people by sharing new voices and perspectives on the environmental and socio-political issues that make up Chicago’s landscape. This idea will be echoed in projects brought to the biennial from around the world. In preparation for the multi-month event, the curators have worked on research initiatives in Chicago, Sao Paulo, Johannesburg, and Vancouver to uncover the most important issues to architects and citizens living in cities today. “Through these engagements,” Umolu said in a statement, “we have drawn out a myriad of stories about how lived experiences across global communities, cities, territories, and ecologies resonate with architectural and space-making practices.” The 2019 Chicago Architecture Biennial will run from September 19, 2019, through January 5, 2020. It is free and open to the public. The central exhibition will be held at the Chicago Cultural Center, and other sites throughout the city will host exhibitions, projects, and panels.
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Sebastian ErraZuriz breaks the box at R & Company Gallery

Opening today, Breaking the Box is Sebastian ErraZuriz’s inaugural exhibition at New York collectible design gallery R & Company. On view until March 9, the show presents a curated selection of the Chilean-born, New York–based designer’s functional sculptures, as well as new works from his Mechanical Cabinet series. ErraZuriz's approach transcends disciplinary boundaries. His projects range from public art to interior architecture, experimental furniture, and product design. Whether it's a large video installation in Time Square, women’s shoes, or a shelving unit held up by 3-D-printed reproductions of ancient Greek and Roman busts, ErraZuriz’s designs always contain an element of surprise. The multifaceted talent employs a diverse set of technical skills, material knowledge, and aesthetic styles to produce works that challenge the standards of function. ErraZuriz’s Mechanical Cabinet furniture series is an ongoing project reimagining how people perceive and interact with this type of object. For the latest additions to the series—debuting as part of the Breaking the Box exhibition—the designer utilized traditional woodworking techniques and hidden spinning mechanisms. Though they appear to be simplistic boxes at first glance, the new works can be transformed into modular credenzas and cabinets. While the Fan Cabinet's flexible slat surface opens into concentric patterns, the Grand Complication piece unravels like a Russian nesting doll. Fan Cabinet by Sebastian ErraZuriz, 2018 from R & Company on Vimeo. The Grand Complication by Sebastian ErraZuriz from R & Company on Vimeo. “We tend to understand reality by constraining meaning into closed and simplified boxes defined by previous cultural conventions. We live within these pre-established cognitive borders, where we only tend to see, recognize and accept as true, that which has been previously ordered and defined,” said ErraZuriz. "In Breaking the Box, I use art, design, and craft to break open our relationship to objects, beauty, and time, in order to reconsider conventions."
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Italian artist Matilde Cassani creates a veritable sunset made with glitter

A glittery exhibition at Rome’s new interior design center, Cantiere Galli Design, presents a dreamlike landscape constructed within the confines of a small room. Sunset, designed by up-and-coming Italian artist Matilde Cassani, is a site-specific project that invites visitors to step into another shiny, immersive dimension. The piece is part of an ongoing series set up within the two-year-old show space called A room of one’s own. For her contribution, Cassani placed traditional furniture pieces sparingly within the room while covering the walls with a shimmery gold palette. At the center of the space is a minimalistic table holding up a mirror that reflects a hanging curtain depicting a yellow sun on the back wall. On top of the table are sprinkled shards of vibrantly colored paper that add another layer of pop to space. The whole room, a large abstract setup, is meant to seduce people immediately upon entering. “Visitors, attracted by the sleek, ultra-glossy surfaces, leave a trace when they run their fingers on every smooth texture,” said Cassani. “The sunset is thus ever-changing, transforming daily, as each visitor passes by.” Cassani’s piece is the successor to Andrea Anastasio’s vision for A room of one’s own. Both artists were asked during the 2019 season to design their concepts around the theme of “leaving a trace,” which was chosen by curator Domitilla Dardi. “The spaces we live in are far from being tidy, perfect, and neat like the ones we see on magazines or ads,” he said in a statement. “The spaces we live in are a reflection of our imperfect and of its extraordinary uniqueness. ‘To live means to leave traces’ said Walter Benjamin.” Sunset by Matilde Cassani opened in late November and is on view through April 2019 at Cantiere Galli Design in Rome, Italy.