Posts tagged with "Events":

Placeholder Alt Text

Open House New York Offering Tours of Architect’s Offices

Tour New York's design hot spots! Open House New York (OHNY) opens up scores of the city's most important building for public tours every year, and now it's doing the same for architect's offices. OHNY will open a variety of offices for self-guided public tours in four of the city's most creative design centers: DUMBO, The Brooklyn Navy Yard, Varick Street, and Red Hook. The first tour of Dumbo (also sponsored by Two Trees Development,  the DUMBO Improvement District, and The Architect's Newspaper) is schedule for Saturday, February 25 from 1:00 to 5:00 pm. You will gain unprecedented access to some of the most creative design firms in New York, but you must sign up on the OHNY website. The day will end with a reception at a Dumbo design space with the participating architects. To see a full list of participating firms and to register, click here.
Placeholder Alt Text

On View> Nancy Holt: Sightlines at the Graham Foundation

NANCY HOLT: Sightlines
The Graham Foundation
Four West Burton Place
Chicago
Through December 17

Beginning her artistic career in the 1960s, Nancy Holt helped pioneer the Land Art movement alongside artists like Richard Serra and Robert Smithson, who was her husband and occasional collaborator. Nancy Holt: Sightlines at the Graham Foundation presents documentation of over 40 of her monumental and ecologically-focused projects through photography, film, and artist’s books, revealing Holt’s eloquent mode of navigating the intersection of art and nature.

In Sun Tunnels, an installation and 1978 film (above), sunlight interacts with four concrete tunnels in the Great Basin Desert in Utah, exemplifying Holt’s interest in space and time by highlighting how the passage of the sun impacts each tunnel differently and in a way specific to that location. In addition to presenting previously unseen materials from the artist’s archive, the exhibition, which concentrates on the Holt’s work between 1966 and 1980, features the documentary Pine Barrens (1975) about undeveloped land in New Jersey, and documentation of the projects Swamp (1971, in collaboration with Smithson), Boomerang (1973, in collaboration with Serra), and the multi-monitor installation Points of View (1974), a piece that underscores the different perspectives we bring to viewing the landscape.

Placeholder Alt Text

Saturday in Santa Monica: Architects Make Music

Unfrozen Music: Architects in Concert Santa Monica Main Library Saturday, October 22, 2011 at 7:00 PM Tomorrow night a few talented Los Angeles architects—several featured on the pages of AN over the years—will be showing off their skills at the third annual Unfrozen Music, a concert at the Santa Monica Library's MLK Auditorium. Emcee'd by AN West Coast Editor Sam Lubell, the lineup ranges from chamber music to jazz to indie rock. And here's a secret—they're all really good. The night's lineup: Alice Kimm and Doris Sung—chamber ensemble Jon Frishman, et al, Blue Fountain—jazz band Jonathan Ward, Gary Popenoe, et al—jazz band Lorenzo Marasso—classical piano quintet Melody Jiang—classical piano solo Terence Young, et al, Splendido—indie rock band
Placeholder Alt Text

Public Architecture, Conversations on Design and Public Impact

Last night, the Woolly Mammoth theater in downtown Washington, D.C. hosted a forum on design's potential to affect social change, organized by the San Francisco nonprofit Public Architecture and sponsored by Teknion. Attendees filed into a rehearsal hall to hear four speakers from the public and private sectors who are using design to effect change on different scales. John Peterson, the founder of Public Architecture, introduced the session with a brief survey of his organization's projects and programs, and a call to action: Noting that there are 1.5 million nonprofit organizations in the United States, and that their total annual revenue tops $1 trillion, he contended that this is an important client base designers have mostly failed to engage. An important objective of Public Architecture right now is "to wake that sleeping economy," he said. Jess Zimbabwe, executive director of the Rose Center for Public Leadership at the Urban Land Institute, spoke about her group's efforts to foster dialogue between developers and public officials. A fellowship program that the Rose Center runs for public officials allows them to "step back from emergencies at their desks" and practice design thinking—not the most natural mode of thinking for them, Zimbabwe pointed out. Gabriel Kroiz, an architect who is program director at Morgan State University's architecture school in Baltimore, discussed his work on the building and neighborhood scales in that city, as well as his teaching, and Frank Giblin, director of the Urban Development/Good Neighbor Program at the GSA, described the collaborative strategies used to improve public spaces around several of that agency's courthouse projects. Local developer Jair Lynch spoke of belonging to a "new age of developers" who are responding to the societal shift toward living and working in existing places, and put forward a five-stage model of urban regeneration. The conversation picks up again tonight in Philadelphia, with a forum at the Arts Ballroom on Locust Street.
Placeholder Alt Text

On View> 194X–9/11: American Architects and the City

194X–9/11: American Architects and the City The Museum of Modern Art 11 West 53rd St. Through January 2 Prompted by the United States’ entrance into World War II in 1942, Architectural Forum magazine commissioned pioneering architects to imagine and plan a postwar American city. At the tenth anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, 194X-9/11: American Architects and the City features the plans, renderings, and sculpture of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Louis Kahn, Paul Rudolph, and Rem Koolhaas and their ideas for cities of the future. Rarely displayed works, such as Mies van der Rohe’s collage Museum for a Small City Project (1942), above, reveal plans for cultural centers and urban life in uncertain times.
Placeholder Alt Text

On View> The American Style: Colonial Revival and the Modern Metropolis

The American Style: Colonial Revival and the Modern Metropolis Museum of the City of New York 1220 Fifth Avenue Through October 30 Following the U.S. Centennial of 1876, architecture in New York City was defined by what was known as “the American style,” a visual language referencing both the nation’s nostalgia for its beginnings and its progressive aspirations. A new exhibition reveals the impact of Colonial Revival on the cityscape through vintage photographs and objects like a 1926 mahogany settee by the Company of Master Craftsmen, whose volutes reflect a resurgence in classicism that is the trademark of the Colonial.  
Placeholder Alt Text

On View> Blinky Palermo: Retrospective 1964-1977

Blinky Palermo: Retrospective 1964-1977 Dia: Beacon/CCS Bard 3 Beekman Street/18 West 86th St. Beacon, NY/New York, NY Though October 31 Dia: Beacon and the Bard Center for Curatorial Studies have co-organized a comprehensive exhibition of the post-war German artist Blinky Palermo. Palermo’s works on paper (1963–1973) are on view at Bard, while his Metal Pictures and later works (1973–1977) are displayed in Dia: Beacon’s expansive galleries. A student of Joseph Beuys, Palermo’s work dealt with the relationship of color and space, and in Europe he gained notice for his abstract large-scale murals. Inspired by a trip to America in the early ‘70s, Palermo created the To the People of New York series, above, based on the colors of the East German and West German flags.
Placeholder Alt Text

On View> Architecture in Uniform: Designing and Building for the Second World War

Architecture in Uniform: Designing and Building for the Second World War Canadian Centre for Architecture 1920, rue Baile Montréal, Québec, Canada Through September 18 How did World War II impact the built environment? This new exhibit curated by Jean-Louis Cohen explores how 20th century architects contributed to the war efforts and how their work ultimately led to the modern structural and technological innovations that make some of today’s complex designs possible. WWII was an accelerator of technological innovation, and from 1937 to 1945 architects were frequently pressed to pursue the most modern solutions, which often meant the most cutting edge. Designed by New York-based WORKac, the exhibit is comprised of drawings, photographs, posters, books, publications, models, historical documents, and films that reveal how contemporary architecture left its mark on the landscapes of both the Axis and the Allied powers. Organized thematically, the exhibition focuses on wartime activity as well as architects and their projects in Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Spain, the United States, and the USSR. Architecture in Uniform is part of a larger project at the CCA that examines the various roles of architecture from the Second World War to today called On the Natural History of Destruction.
Placeholder Alt Text

Mark Handforth Sculptures at Chicago MCA “Big” Deal

Mark Handforth Plaza Project Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago 220 East Chicago Avenue July 8 through October 10 The formality of the plaza and entrance that Josef Paul Kleihues designed for the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago has always stood in contrast to the institution’s experimental spirit. This summer the Miami-based artist Mark Handforth will debut four playful sculptures on the plaza and west facade of the building, including a giant brass coat hanger (above) hand bent by the artist. Other pieces, which mine Surrealism even more explicitly, include a giant streetlamp coiled like a snake, a monumental bone with a telephone handset hanging off the top, and a massive crumpled traffic cone topped with an English bobby’s hat.
Placeholder Alt Text

On View> Pipilotti Rist: The Tender Room

Pipilotti Rist: The Tender Room Wexner Center for the Arts The Ohio State University 1871 North High St. Columbus, Ohio Through July 31 Swiss artist Pipilotti Rist makes her debut in Columbus with a new site-specific project drawn from the artist’s latest inspirations. The lush multimedia environment promises visitors a full-body experience, featuring kaleidoscopic colors, lulling soundtracks, and whimsical lighting, along with lounge chairs for taking in the sights and sounds. As usual, Rist takes a familiar starting point, such as the body, and plays with it (altering colors, speed, and sound) until it becomes unfamiliar and even fascinating. Drawing inspiration from her first feature-length film, Pepperminta (2009), Rist complicates the visitors’ environment, blurring the boundary between fantasy and reality. The exhibition also features Rist’s single-channel video Open My Glade (Flatten) (2000) outside the Wexner Center’s east entrance.
Placeholder Alt Text

On View> Tim Burton Descends on LACMA

Tim Burton Los Angeles County Museum of Art Los Angeles Through October 31 Best known for directing films like The Nightmare Before Christmas, Edward Scissorhands, Batman Returns, and Beetle Juice, Tim Burton and his work as an illustrator, writer, and artist are being honored with a retrospective at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. This new show celebrates the way that Burton has managed to put his own spin on movies in an industry known for its fear of the unknown. With over 700 items on display, including drawings, paintings, photographs, film and video works, storyboards, puppets, concept artworks, maquettes, costumes, and assorted cinematic ephemera, visitors get a glimpse into the mind of this modern day Renaissance man. Though the show debuted on the east coast at New York’s Museum of Modern Art, the LACMA version of the show, organized by Britt Salvesen, offers its own take on the Burbank native’s body of work. Burton collaborated with the exhibition designers to transform the museum’s Resnick Pavilion into an appropriately “Burtonesque” environment. He also created several new pieces for the exhibition, including what the museum describes as a “revolving multimedia, black-light carousel installation that hangs from the ceiling.”
Placeholder Alt Text

On View> Material Landscapes in St. Louis

Seemingly sliced into the asphalt of a Brooklyn street beneath the Manhattan Bridge is an unexpected glass-filled "tattoo" designed by landscape architect Paula Meijerink, founder of Boston-based WANTED Landscape. Meijerink is among eight landscape architects featured in Material Landscapes, a recently opened exhibition at the Sheldon Art Galleries in St. Louis running through January 21st, 2012. Work from the eight firms including D.I.R.T  studio, dlandstudio, Stoss Landscape Urbanism, Legge Lewis Legge, PEG office, Kaseman Beckman Advanced Strategies, and ESKYIU is presented in photographs and drawings. Curator Liane Hancock, senior lecturer at Washington University in St. Louis, chose projects ranging from a vertical container garden in Hong Kong to a waterfront in Milwaukee to reflect innovative use of materials in landscape architecture and to advance landscape design in St. Louis in light of major projects such as Citygarden and the redevelopment of the St. Louis Arch grounds.