Posts tagged with "Events":

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Giveaway! Enter to Win a Seat at the Non-Linear Lab on Digital Fabrication

Studio Mode | modeLab is excited to announce a promotional offer for the upcoming NON-LINEAR LAB: Growth Systems and Digital Fabrication with Skylar Tibbits. With generous support from The Architect's Newspaper and Fabrikator, we are giving away a Complimentary Seat to this intensive design workshop. The Lab is scheduled for September 8th/9th and will be a weekend full of programming, parametric design, and digital fabrication. Come design and make some wild prototypes with us! Promotional Details: "Like" us and enter to win a free seat in the Lab. Winner announced Friday, August 31st at 11:59PM EST. Lab Details: NON-LINEAR LAB is two-day workshop on Growth Systems, Parametric Detailing, and Digital Fabrication. This Lab is the next installment in our coLAB series and is the result of collaborative research undertaken by Skylar Tibbits [SJET + Previous coLAB Instructor] and Ronnie Parsons + Gil Akos [Studio Mode/modeLab]. In a fast-paced and hands-on learning environment, we will cover Fundamental Concepts of Programming and Parametric Design as well as an introduction to Laser Cutting Constraints and Best Practices. Emphasis will be placed on iterative prototyping, allowing for a thorough investigation of a series of Growth, Component, and Detailing Scripts using Python and Grasshopper while working directly with our CNC equipment.
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Tactical Urbanism Death Match Ends Only With Scratches

What happens when you gather four tactical urbanists in one room for a "Death Match"-style debate asking, "Is Small Big Enough?" You get a choir. The panel at the Flux Factory's discussion last night was equipped with "smackdown cards" to challenge the views of their opponents, but they all agreed more often than they disagreed, that the small scale actions at the root of tactical urbanism—and this years US Pavilion at the Venice Biennale, Spontaneous Interventions—are just fine. What emerged from the packed house was a highly polished discussion, where minor differences were exposed, ground down, and made smooth. The panel consisted of designer and critical activist of DSGN AGNC Quilian Riano, tactical urbanism guru and Street Plans Collaborative principal Mike Lydon, Hester Street Collaborative director Anne Frederick, and planner and co-founder of Change Administration and DoTank:Brooklyn Aurash Khawarzad, who will all be participating in the Biennale next week, and was moderated by the Flux Factory's Douglas Paulson and Christina Vassallo. Each brought a nuanced perspective on the importance of small scale urban interventions. In determining how to evaluate tactical interventions, Khawarzad started the debate by suggesting that simply making an effort is a success in itself, that asking people to think or build or do something in a different way can make an action successful. "Cities are going through a discovery phase," he said. "Engaging in public space is making something happen." Others disagreed, arguing that more should be required of evaluating interventions. Frederick said that any action must be evaluated on how it responded to needs identified by the surrounding community. Others suggested that the actions must amount to or lead to something larger to be successful and criteria should be set beforehand to weigh against the results. Lydon pointed out that one of the main goals of tactical urbanism is for "small scale action to lead to long-term change," which means a strategy and goals must be considered. "Doing is good, but the action can still fail," Lydon said. All agreed, then, that failure is an important part of the small-scale process. "Failure is the game," Riano said, taking a jab at the planning failures of the past that have helped to give rise to the popularity of tactical urbanism. "Failure today is our system's inability to get over what happened in the 1950s," he said. Lydon noted that that large-scale mistakes of the past—like overbuilding the suburbs—brought horrible results that are difficult to undo, but failing with small scale actions tends not to cause harm and can serve as a learning process for adapting tactics to individual situations. While the panel delved further and sometimes disagreed on the details of meaning, gentrification, and politics, they again merged on the value of working with existing power structures such as municipal governments to affect change. The panel quipped that  yarnbombing might not bring long term change, but working to change the rules can help turn pop-up parks and parklets into a lasting public space policy. As the panel packs up and prepares to leave for Venice, you can weigh in on the value of the tactical actions being presented as part of the Spontaneous Interventions pavilion at an online debate at the Philip Johnson Glass House website going on over the next 10 days.

Event> Archi-Filmmaker Evan Mather In Focus

While feature length architecture documentaries like My ArchitectVisual Acoustics and Unfinished Spaces have received oscar nominations and international acclaim (sometimes both), there's always room in our hearts for shorts. One of the most talented filmmakers in this genre is Evan Mather, who has put together a string of the briefer variety. Eight of his shorts will be screened tomorrow evening at LA's A+D Museum as part of its on screen series. Mather, who has been making films since he was eight years old, is also a landscape architect, working as a principal at LA's AHBE landscape architects. He's brought that expertise to films for AHBE and others. He's also made a feature, A Neccessary Ruin, about Buckminster Fuller's Union Tank Car Dome. "I'm interested in the perception of landscapes and how we remember them—how they influence us," said Mather, who grew up in New Orleans. Although, he adds, "It can be a challenge to convey highly technical information in an interesting way." One of the pieces, Building A Sustainable Future, documents the creation of AHBE's work at Burbank Water and Power, which included the transformation of abandoned substation into a large vine trellis, employee garden and courtyard.  Another, Pavilion dans les Arbes, is the story of Touraine Richmond Architects'  beautiful new Silverwood Lake State Recreation Area Visitors’ Center in California’s San Bernardino Mountains. A third is 12 Minutes to Vegas, which through time-lapse video compresses the three-and-a-half hour drive from Los Angeles to Las Vegas into 12 minutes. Now that's speeding. Others tackle issues in the profession like recycling paper waste (So What?), using traditional materials in new ways (Ojama), and design philosophy (Expressions). Mather believes that this type of video work will soon become the norm in architecture. "As designers we need move beyond relying on animated fly-thrus and video translations of PowerPoint presentations... With these tools being so accessible more and more design firms are using video to communicate their work."
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Saturday! Open House New York Explores Spaces for Arts and Design in Red Hook

OHNYopenstudios in Red Hook Saturday, July 28, 12:00-5:00 p.m. Reception to follow at Botanico Cafe, 5:00-7:00 p.m. Tickets $30 / $20 for students and seniors. Purchase tickets here. As part of the Open House New York openstudios series, artists’ studios in Red Hook, Brooklyn will throw open their doors this weekend. Just last week OHNY announced that Dustin Yellin has agreed to open his studio-which must be one of the most beautiful in the city (above). In addition, metalworkers, furniture designers, and glassblowers will be thrown into the mix, making the event a good fabrication tour as well. The self guided event kicks off Saturday at noon followed by a wine reception with the artisans and tour goers around 5:00 p.m. at Botanico Cafe at 220 Conover Street. The cafe is adjacent to the organic chocolate and Liquor distillery Cacao Prieto also a beautiful Red Hook space. This promises to be one of the most interesting Saturday studio tours in the Open House series and we look forward to seeing you in Brooklyn.
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Thursday: New Practices New York 2012 to Kick Off with a Party

On June 14, 2012, the AIA New York will showcase six of the seven winning firms from the 4th biennial New Practices New York 2012 competition, promoting new and promising firms in New York, at a party at the Center for Architecture. This year, the winning firms contended with over fifty entries to earn the designation. The New Practices New York contest was limited to firms founded after 2006 and located within New York City’s five boroughs, but despite the restrictions, the competition was open to multidisciplinary firms, widening the variety of the work being submitted. To the design enthusiast’s delight, the exhibition will showcase work varying from architectural models to projections and installations. Along with the exhibition, a symposium will be arranged to further enlighten its visitors. An opening party for the exhibition will take place Thursday, June 14th from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m. at the Center for Architecture. A panel discussion will follow shortly after on July 16th at 6:00 p.m. with presentations from the winning firms: ABRUZZO BODZIAK ARCHITECTS, HOLLER architecture, The Living, SLO Architecture, formlessfinder and Christian Wassmann.  All free and open to the public, the exhibition and scheduled symposiums will last till September 8th, 2012.
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Join Us For A Teaching Moment Next Tuesday

  This editor's recent piece on the divide between architectural education and architectural practice has spurred a lot of discussion, prompting both high praise for addressing a worsening problem and charges of, ahem, "neoconservatism." If it's a debate that interests you, please join us next Tuesday, May 29 at Gensler's new headquarters for the panel discussion, "A Teaching Moment." Panelists include UCLA's Neil Denari, Michael Maltzan, USC's Alice Kimm, Woodbury's Barbara Bestor, SCI-Arc's John Enright, and Gensler's Li Wen. At the panel we will discuss not only the schism between practice and education, but also new approaches toward technology, urbanism, and more. See you there!
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Join Open House New York Saturday for a Day at the Yard

The Brooklyn Navy Yard is home to New York's most spectacular collection of industrial buildings, warehouses, and 19th century dry docks. The Yard is normally closed to the public, but this Saturday Open House New York will open the gated industrial park to the public and many of its artisans, designers, and fabricators will be on hand to conduct tours of their studio spaces. The Navy Yard has just opened Building 92 with a spectacular museum of the facility's history and an adjacent exhibition space featuring an exhibit of the collected steel dies (called hubs) of Mathew Lewandowski who was tool and die maker based in the Yard. The hubs on display represent 30 years of Lewandowski's production and are beautiful objects in their own right as well as being tools for mass production. This Saturday is supposed to be beautiful weather so join Open House for a day in the Yard and its after party with the artists and artisans on the tour.
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Event> Eventually Everything: The 2012 D-Crit Conference May 2

Eventually Everything: The 2012 D-Crit Conference Wednesday, May 2, 12:30–7:00 p.m. Visual Arts Theatre 333 West 23rd Street No charge for admission; Registration required On May 2 the School of Visual Arts Design Criticism MFA program, a.k.a. D-Crit, presents its third annual thesis conference, and this year's line-up promises to be intriguing, covering an array of subjects--"Main Street, USA and the Power of Myth," "Graphic Ornament in Interior Architecture," "Towers to Town Homes: Public Housing, Policy, and Design in the US" to "Missing the Modern Gun: Object Ethics in Collections of Design," to name a few. The list of thesis topics alone makes a statement about the possibilities of design criticism and how D-Crit aims to push its limits. To encompass this eclectic collection of research and ideas, the students invoked that ultimate master of the mash-up, Charles Eames, who once said "Eventually everything connects—people, ideas, objects..." Connecting the dots at this afternoon conference will be Julie Lasky of Change Observer, who will emcee and preside over four themed panels—Calculated Nostalgia; Working/Not Working; Speaking Surfaces; Man, Machine, and Morality—each featuring several high-profile keynotes, including media historian Stuart Ewen, Pentagram partner Michael Bierut, 2×4 founding partner Michael Rock, cultural historian Jeffrey Schnapp, and Interboro Partners principal Daniel D’Oca. Student presentations are grouped within the panels, and, lest you need further convincing, just have a look at the slick video teasers of the ten MFA candidates' upcoming talks. For more information, visit the Eventually Everything website or view the full program here. To attend, sign up for free registration, and follow @dcritconference for updates.
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Thursday: Panel discusses designs for Long Island City

Noguchi Skyviewing model, 1969. (Courtesy Noguchi Museum) Thursday night at the Center for Architecture, AN's executive editor and editor of the forthcoming Civic Action publication Julie V. Iovine will moderate a panel on Civic Action: A Vision for Long Island City, a site-study and exhibition featuring innovative design proposals for the Long Island City neighborhood of Queens. The panel will include Lyn Rice, Elliott Maltby, and Claire Weisz speaking about involving the arts in civic planning. See you there!
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Celebrate Earth Day With a “Neutra Run-Walk” in Silver Lake

Architecture lovers, time to get motivated. This Earth Day (April 22) you can celebrate Richard Neutra’s 120th birthday by participating in the Neutra Run-Walk for Health, a 4k or 8k jaunt around LA's Silver Lake Reservoir. “Neutra always stood for health, so it made sense to host this event,” said Dion Neutra, son of the famous architect. Neutra says he hopes the walk will become an annual event for the Neutra Institute. The walking path will start at the Silver Lake Meadow in front of the VDL Research House II, at 2300 Silver Lake Blvd., and continue counter clockwise around the reservoir. The walk is open to everyone, whether they plan to finish the race in record time or take a leisurely stroll. “We want to remind people what it’s all about. Just get out and get around, no matter how slowly,” said Neutra. Each participant gets a free commemorative pin and entry to the awards ceremony. Though prizes still haven’t been finalized, Neutra said they might give a signed copy of Neutra's Survival Through Design  to the winner. Proceeds go toward the preservation of the VDL Research House II and other efforts by the institute. Register on the Neutra Institute webpage.
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Channeling Mumford

NYC DOT Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan lauds Grand Army Plaza. (Branden Klayko) DOT Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan has been invited to deliver the prestigious 2012 Lewis Mumford Lecture on Urbanism at the Spitzer School of Architecture at City College on April 5. The lecture will be held in the freshly restored Shepard Hall.  
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IESNYC Student Lighting Competition

  The 12th annual IESNYC Student Lighting Competition, “Fraction/Refraction”, was held Wednesday night at the appropriately well-lit Helen Mills Event Space in Chelsea.  The competition was open to all interested students in New York City and included entries from designers at Pratt Institute, Parsons/New School, Fashion Institute of Technology, Fordham, and New York School of Interior Design.  Over 100 entries created a luminous one-night exhibition of over 100 light-sourced objects, each with a different take on this year’s theme of  “how light plays with textures, flows through materials and creates layers of contrast.”   There were many different takes on the theme at different scales.  Some entries were more traditional light-emitting objects, others used multiple lights and materials to create layered effects, while some obscured the line between object and environment by projecting designs onto the walls of the gallery.  Many were interactive, and there were even some  architectural models, which doubled as lamps that night.  A keynote address came from Dietrich Neumann, author of Structure of Light: Richard Kelly and the Illumination of Modern Architecture, about Kelly’s work as "the first modern lighting designer" including his close collaborations with Philip Johnson and Mies Van Der Rohe.  Kelly even convinced Mies to use the white travertine in the Seagrams Building rather than dark green marble.   Grand Prize went to Pratt's Sejung Oh, whose project titled "Dal Beat" was inspired by Oh's pondering of the moon and how its light reflected off of water.  It was an interactive piece, inviting participants to hit the moon-like drumskin, sending vibrations through water which reflected the light into radial patterns. When asked what he was going to do next, Oh responded, "Im excited to go home and sleep. I didn't sleep last night."  Well, Sejung, it paid off.  The Grand Prize is $2,000 and a trip to Paris to visit L'atelier and La Machine.   Second Place was Ivre, by Sang Yoon-Lee also of Pratt. His well-constructed wine bottle projectors got the judges' attention with interactive cork screws which allowed users to play with the focus of light on the wall via lenses in the bottles.   In Third Place was Farnaz Hamedanchian, of New York School of Interior Design.  Her peaceful composition of natural elements used refracted light to make artful shadows on the wall behind them.  The simple, organic feel of the piece set it apart from most of the other projects which used an assortment of lighting technologies and synthetic materials.   An honorable mention went to Pratt's Andrew An and his "Quasar" project.  The simple setup utilized a directed light source in its base which was refracted through a suspended glass ball, making an animated projection on the ceiling.  The piece directly referenced Achille Castiglioni's Arco Lamp, and was one of many examples of projects that served as both object and environmental element, an interesting take on the theme of refraction.