Posts tagged with "ennis house":

Frank Lloyd Wright’s fully-restored Ennis House is for sale for $23 million

Following an extensive, more than a decade-long restoration, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Ennis House in Los Angeles is for sale.  The 5,500-square-foot neo-Mayan hilltop house was designed by Wright in 1923 and is on the market for a cool $23 million. The home is the last and largest of Wright’s “textile block” homes in Los Angeles. The home was last listed for sale in 2009 for $15 million following a slew of upgrades and renovations, a figure that eventually fell to a mere $4.5 million in the fallout of the 2008 economic collapse. In 2011 the home finally sold to business executive Ron Burkle, the current owner. The home was previously owned by the Ennis House Foundation, which sold the property to Burkle with a requirement that it be open to public tours for at least 12 days per year, a stipulation that will follow the house as it changes hands once again. After the 2011 purchase, Burkle spent the next six years fully restoring the home with help from Wright’s grandson Eric Lloyd Wright, who was the historic preservation consultant for the project. Matt Construction executed the restoration work on the house, a project that involved structurally stabilizing the house as well as replacing nearly 4,000 of the home’s 27,000 textile concrete blocks. The building was also re-roofed during the restoration, and the home’s interior wood floors, ceilings, and art glass windows were restored.  Prior to the restoration work, the home had sat in horrible shape after suffering extensive structural damage following the 1994 Northridge earthquake. In 2005, torrential rains in L.A. caused much of the roof damage and interior deterioration that the latest restoration corrected.  The home is famous for being shown in a variety of films, including Blade Runner and House on Haunted Hill. The home was originally commissioned for Charles and Mabel Ennis and is currently listed on the market by Beverly Hill-based realtors Branden and Rayni Williams of Hilton & Hyland. 

Finally! Frank Lloyd Wright Ennis House Sold After Two Year Wait

Frank Lloyd Wright's Ennis House in Los Angeles, which went on the market back in June 2009 for $15 million has finally sold for less than a third of that: $4.5 million. Local business mogul Ron Burkle, who also owns the historic Greenacres/Harold Lloyd Estate in Beverly Hills, is, according to Ennis House Foundation Chair Marla Felber, "committed to complete rehabilitation" of the beleaguered house, which despite a recent rehabilitation still needs a lot of work. "While we did receive some other offers, they didn't come from sources that could meet our main objective of finding a good steward for the house," Felber told AN, adding that the Foundation was "thrilled," to find the right buyer for the house, despite the lower sale price. The 6,200 square foot Ennis House, designed by Wright and built in 1924 by his son Lloyd, is the most famous of Wright's Textile Block Houses, made of more than 27,000 concrete blocks. The house had deteriorated over time and was especially hard hit by the 1994 Northridge Earthquake and record rains in 2005. Despite a significant rehabilitation that stabilized the house and replaced more than 3,000 of the house's tiles, the house still needs millions of dollars worth of more work (including the repair of many more concrete blocks) and the Ennis Foundation lacked the resources to complete the work, putting the house on the market. Felber says that according to the terms of a conservation easement Burkle must provide some form of public access to the house for a minimum of 12 days per year, although the specifics of that deal haven't been worked out, she said. Another easement permanently protects the house's interior and exterior from "excessive alteration." The house payment will help the Foundation pay off its construction loan, said Felber.

Quick Clicks> Heckling Hadid, HL23 Highlight, Gimme Shelter, and the Ennis House Blues

Heckling Hadid. The New York Times reports that the city council in Elk Grove, California is reconsidering its Bilbao moment. Once upon a time before the recession, the community hoped a community center designed by Zaha Hadid would bring acclaim to the suburban city. Now as plans are being reconsidered, the council only sees a "squid" or an "animal from another planet." LA on HL. Usually found prowling around the west coast, Christopher Hawthorne, architecture critic for the LA Times, has found his way to New York and takes a look at HL23, that condo tower perched above Manhattaned beloved High Line by LA architect Neil Denari. Gimme (Smartly Planned) Shelter. It turns out that when Rolling Stones keyboardist Chuck Leavell isn't rocking out, he's pondering smart growth. Smart Planet relays a recent event at the National Press Club where Leavell and co-author J. Marshall Craig talk transportation, sustainability, and community growth. Ennis House Blues. Curbed reports that Frank Lloyd Wright's 1924 Ennis House in LA just can't seem to find a buyer since it was put on the market in 2009. Originally listed at $15 million, the price has steadily dropped to its current $5.9 mil.  

A Brief History of Old Buildings Going Futuro On Film

Talk of William Pereira’s Geisel Library, the well-known symbol of UC San Diego, has been abuzz online because of its Snow Fortress doppelganger in Inception, which has so far totaled close to half a billion dollars in ticket sales.  Built in the late 1960s, this textbook example of Brutalism perfectly encapsulates the hostile, uncommunicative theme of Inception. Critics of the style say Brutalist architecture disregards the history and harmony of its environment. Thus, the Snow Fortress, featured at the film’s climax, is a symbol of disregard for preordained fate. Although the Geisel Library, named after Theodore Seuss Geisel or Dr. Seuss, was conceived over five decades ago, it does not seem out of place in a futuristic world. Similarly, the Bradbury Building in Los Angeles, designed by George H. Wyman, was built in 1893. Yet, this “retro-futuristic-gothic”  building was featured in Blade Runner, The Outer Limits and Mission: Impossible, among others.  Minority Report used the Ronald Reagan building  in Washington, D.C. as its Orwellian police headquarters (Frank Lloyd Wright's Ennis House also starred as Harrison Ford's residence in Blade Runner). Greene and Greene's Robert R. Blacker House in Pasadena is an iconically American house that served as Dr. Emmett Brown’s house in Back to the Future and a grandfather’s house in Armageddon. It seems regardless of how futuristic a movie is, the buildings of yesteryear and today can still lend their symbolic power to help layer a movie with meaning.

Ennis On the Block

Reuters today reports that Frank Lloyd Wright's famed Ennis House in Los Feliz has been put on the market for $15 million, potentially taking it out of the public realm. The textile block house, which looks a lot like a large Mayan Temple, was made famous for its role in Blade Runner and a slew of other movies and tv shows. According to Ennis House Foundation president James DeMeo, the foundation just didn't have the ability to keep it going: "We've made a lot of progress, but at this point a private owner with the right vision and sufficient resources can better preserve the house than we can as a small nonprofit." The foundation said the house, which had been renovated and repaired after the 1994 Northridge Earthquake, still requires a further $5 to $7 million in renovation. It also didn't help that, as our own reports showed, neighbors had been clamoring for it to fall into private hands because of their fear of large crowds of visitors. According to Reuters the sale is being handled by Hilton & Hyland and Dilbeck Realtors, with assistance from Christie's Great Estates, a subsidiary of Christie's auction house. We just hope we can still get a chance to see inside before it sells!