Posts tagged with "Elkus Manfredi":

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Boston-area smart city aims at city’s booming tech sector

While tech giant Alphabet recently announced it would develop 12 acres of Toronto waterfront into a smart-city-technology testing ground, a similar undertaking has already begun 12 miles south of Boston. Developer LStar Ventures has big plans to turn this 1,500-acre site, dubbed Union Point (formerly South Weymouth Naval Air Station), into a “smart” development that will specially cater to technology companies. On the surface, the project is an eco-friendly exurban development with a leafy, bicycle- and pedestrian-friendly mixed-use master plan. In addition to offering housing, retail, residences, restaurants, three million square feet of office space, and eight million square feet of commercial development, Union Point would connect to Boston—and its booming tech industry scene—via a nearby MBTA commuter rail. Boston-based Elkus Manfredi and Watertown, Massachusetts–based Sasaki are master planning Union Point and working with engineering firms such as Arup, Vanderweil Engineers, and VHB on a range of sustainable features, including natural, on-site wastewater treatment systems. However, where Union Point really sets itself apart is in its information technology infrastructure. The city will lay the foundations for its tenants to use its streets and buildings as testing grounds for smart city technology. In addition to omnipresent wi-fi, “Union Point will have a site-wide fiber-optic cabling system to support commercial tenants, building assets, and IoT [Internet of Things] systems,” said David Wilts, associate principal and digital master planning leader at Arup. In other words, companies will be able to install sensors to collect data on air quality and building performance, and even be able to set up public digital signage. In this way, Union Point could easily support smart city ventures similar to Chicago’s Array of Things sensor network or New York City’s LinkNYC towers. The first stage of development is a $25 million sports complex designed by Elkus Manfredi and Sasaki that will feature multiple fields, including a rugby pitch, playground, park, restaurant, and renovated gymnasium. Including this complex was crucial in the two-year process of getting local communities on board with the development; its fields will be available to the three nearby towns at reduced leasing rates. Technology, however, is a notoriously fickle thing to design into a project. For example, the video-call screens installed in Korea’s smart city mega-development Songdo are already obsolete. But Union Point hopes to avoid that by only laying the groundwork for its tenants. “LStar Ventures aspires to be the leader in the practical application of technology that we know, that we can imagine, and that is beyond today’s imagination,” said David Manfredi, founding principal at Elkus Manfredi. “That is why the armature that we create must be flexible, durable, and adaptable over time.” The Boston-area is no stranger to smart city developments, as the 45-acre Cambridge Crossing tech hub was also unveiled this year.
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Renderings revealed for new Elkus Manfredi– and CetraRuddy-designed tower on the UWS

The Upper West Side is about to get its tallest tower yet, and it's a real devil. New renderings show a 666-foot-tall tower (51 floors) in a neighborhood whose abundance of historic districts and individual landmarks typically precludes development of this size. New York–based Elkus Manfredi is designing the exterior, while CetraRuddy is doing the interiors. The latter firm is currently working on a number of projects in the tristate area, including a woven basket–inspired luxury tower on the Upper East Side, and the renovation of the art deco New Jersey Bell Headquarters Building in Newark, New Jersey. The 400,000 square feet of space will be divided into 112 units, each averaging over 3,000 square feet, YIMBY reports. Originally the site hosted a synagogue, but the property, on Amsterdam Avenue at West 70th Street, was acquired by SJP Properties in 2015 for a cool $275 million. The tower's stepped setbacks are reminiscent of the skyscrapers built during the early days of New York City's zoning code, whose light and air mandates prompted skyscrapers to step demurely back from the street. Like those 1920s towers, this one tapers at the top and sports a multi-pronged crown. 200 Amsterdam Avenue is by no means the too-tall kid in the neighborhood. Just down the block, 150 Amsterdam Avenue stands a solid 470 feet, while the old-New-York San Remo, on Central Park West between West 74th and 75th streets, stands 400 feet tall, and newly-built 160 West 62nd Street rises to 598 feet. The construction timeline for 200 Amsterdam has yet to be revealed, but demolition of the synagogue is already underway.