Posts tagged with "Eavesdrop":

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Eavesdrop: Hadid, Jahn, Venturi, and the Soho Grifter

This post is part of our years-long running Eavesdrop series (think Page 6 for architecture gossip). It’s your best source for insider stories and more. Have an eavesdrop of your own? Send it to: eavesdrop[at]archpaper.com.

Strong foundation

If you have been following the saga of Anna Delvey, the so-called “Soho Grifter” in the news, you might have come across the great profile of her in New York magazine. Long story short, Delvey, whose real name is Anna Sorokin, conned rich New York socialites into supporting her lavish lifestyle and her extravagant Soho House–like private club, the Anna Delvey Foundation. She was convicted on May 26 of two counts of second-degree larceny and one count of first-degree attempted larceny. In the trial proceedings, more details have been in the news, including an ARTnews report that displayed a range of slides from the presentation that she used. One of the more exciting ones for us at Eavesdrop is slide 68, which outlines design director Gabriel Calatrava’s role and background. Also, Santiago Calatrava and developer Aby Rosen were board members, while Daniel Arsham of Snarkitecture was listed as an advisory partner of the “foundation.” A spokesperson for Arsham told AN, “Daniel had no role and was as surprised as everyone else to see his name listed in her foundation materials.”

Here's who said it

In last month's Eavesdrop we asked who quipped, “Details wag da dog” in response to Mies van der Rohe’s oft-repeated maxim, “God is in the details.” We all know Robert Venturi’s retort to Mies’s “Less is a bore.” But even more playfully, it was the master of Manayunk himself who said, “Details wag da dog."

Zaha Hadid (doesn’t) sell out

A slowdown in the New York City luxury market seems to have claimed another building. According to Crain’s, the ZHA-designed 520 West 28th has only sold 40 percent of its units, and even less than that when measuring in square feet.

Despite the curvaceous building’s prime location along the High Line, there actually aren’t too many neighborhood institutions, like grocery stores and movie theatres. The building’s sky-high prices and large unit sizes haven’t helped either, and the $60 million double penthouse has sat vacant since the building’s opening.

It appears developer Related is changing its marketing approach, as an eagle-eyed AN editor spotted a massive “ZAHA HADID” banner across the building’s top level while walking the High Line. Now that Hudson Yards is open nearby, Related hopes the extra neighborhood amenities will entice potential buyers.

Helmut’s Langer

Chicago’s decision to award the new $2.2 billion O’Hare Global Terminal and Global Concourse building to the Studio Gang–led team has stirred criticism, and some of it is from a surprising source. Legendary Chicago architect Helmut Jahn released a handwritten note blasting the winning design, saying that he hoped the next mayor of Chicago would roll it back.

“I am embarrassed that some of my most respected colleges [sic] have been missused [sic] to placate a premitidates [sic] decision, not justified by design or experience. Such attitude has not made Chicago a capitol of world architecture. Hopefully the next mayor will turn this around.”

What a world!

Sometimes truth is stranger than fiction. Or is that the other way around? Anyhoo, at a recent roundtable discussion at the United Nations in New York, Bjarke Ingels unveiled a prototype floating city (see front page). In his presentation, he said that his scheme “would not look like Waterworld.” However, one of the two screenwriters of Waterworld was one of the next speakers, Peter Rader. “I bet when Bjarke threw shade at Kevin Costner, he didn’t think the screenwriter of Waterworld was in the audience. This looks exactly what we did in Waterworld,” said Rader.

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Ice Cube, the Architectural Draftsman and Eames Enthusiast

Since an unofficial concept ad was leaked (above, left) in September proclaiming "Ice Cube celebrates Ray & Charles Eames," the web has been abuzz about the rapper's upcoming film on the architects' influence on his life, part of the Getty's Pacific Standard Time series of exhibitions in Los Angeles. For the exhibition on Ray and Charles Eames, Ice Cube recreated an old ad (above, right) from the 1950s, complete with a pipe and a 1953 DAT Chair. Cube, it appears, studied architectural drafting, although he never got his degree.  He joins LA stars like Red Hot Chili Peppers singer Anthony Kiedis and actor Jason Schwartzman in promoting the epic series, which continues through next year.
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Eavesdrop MW 01

DIAMONDS AND PEARLS The cocktail reception for the Driehaus Prize, celebrating classical architecture and traditional urbanism, was held in the hoity-toity vaulted Cathedral Hall at the top of the University Club, a setting fit for a classicist or anyone wishing to recreate scenes from Dead Poets Society. The Trib’s Blair Kamin was there for a minute, along with oodles of Notre Dame students and recent grads sporting ill-fitting suits, engagement rings large and small, and strings of pearls. Definitely not a Jil Sander crowd. This year’s recipient, Rafael Manzano Martos, took the stage to give some remarks but most guests seemed to be oohing and ahhing over the fantastic views of Renzo Piano’s Modern Wing. Piano is the modernist even classicists love, secretly! UIC’s BRIDGE-TO-HAPPY-HOUR Students of the University of Illinois Chicago School of Architecture were given an interesting opportunity to earn some extra design cred: a competition to design a bar for the year-end show. The bar will be located in the vacant skywalk that leads to nowhere, a remnant of the original campus design. Apparently, the jury includes the director of the Graham Foundation, Sarah Herda. Smart competitors should figure out her beverage of choice. She seems like a Manhattan drinker. In any case, let’s just hope it’s capped off at the end or—better yet—that the winning design includes a super slide. AND THE WINNER IS.... The School of the Art Institute is hiring a new Designed Objects professor (that’s SAICspeak for Industrial Design). The pool of candidates has been narrowed down to four, says an inside source: two locals, a New Yorker, and someone from the United Kingdom. Hmmm, wasn’t New York Times/International Herald Tribune’s British-born design scribe Alice Rawsthorn in town a couple of weeks ago? Anywho, let’s hope it’s someone good. The program has definitely had an impact beyond the walls of the school. Chicago’s an architecture town, but it’s great to see the other design disciplines getting their due. BITTER DESIGN BETTY Speaking of the other design disciplines, the AIGA is hosting a Chicago Design Week beginning May 17, kicking off a packed schedule of walks and talks with the likes of designers Art Chantry and Bob Faust, plus studio tours with Gravity Tank, Studio Lab, winterbureau, Sonnenzimmer, and others. But they “pretty much left out anyone that’s not doing graphic design,” said one jilted designer. Whoops, hurt feelings! But more important, couldn’t an interior designer or landscape architect leaven some of the type talk? Send engagement rings, tire swings, or unspeakable things to midwesteavesdrop@archpaper.com.