Posts tagged with "Dulwich Picture Gallery":

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Kaleidoscopic Dulwich Picture Gallery Pavilion lands in South London

What if, when on his Grand Tour, John Soane didn’t go to Italy, but to West Africa? What if, instead of going to Venice, he went to Lagos? This was the question Dingle Price, co-founder of London studio Pricegore, posed when pitching the idea for a pavilion adjacent to the Dulwich Picture Gallery, the oldest purpose-built gallery in England, designed by Soane. The result is The Colour Palace, a gloriously colorful timber structure that nestles between Soane’s 202-year-old building and a residential street. Price and fellow Pricegore cofounder Alex Gore do not hail from West Africa. Such inspiration came from artist and designer Yinka Ilori, who collaborated with the studio for the project. Now based in London, Ilori drew upon markets in Lagos where he was raised. “I wanted to encapsulate the memory of color I have from those markets,” Ilori told AN. “Selling fabrics, color was everywhere.”
And at the new pavilion, color is indeed everywhere. When approaching it, hints of a cacophony of color can be spied: pink tips pop out above the park’s perimeter wall; beyond the trees, glimpses of blue and red can be seen through the green. Closer inspection reveals thin, cuboid timber louvers (there are more than 2100) painted in green, yellow, blue, pink, red, and orange. The result makes the facade shimmer from the outside, blending the different tones in the process. Triangles and circles—motifs prevalent in Ilori’s work as a furniture designer—have been painted on the outside, causing the pavilion to look like a party hat. There’s an overriding sense of fun. But the kaleidoscopic baptism doesn’t end there. The giant party hat sits on four five-and-a-half-feet-wide bright red concrete columns—unpolished and raw, they rise up from the earth. A pink elevated walkway traces the structure’s perimeter, and a blue timber internal support structure keeps it all up. “Our work is very Euro-centric, Yinka’s is very West African,” Price explained. “We wanted to mix the two.” Ilori and Pricegore drew upon two precedents: an image of men carrying a thatched roof in West Africa and caryatids in Athens supporting the Parthenon's entablature. “Building in landscape, we wanted to lift the structure off the ground and retain the open sense of a garden,” added Gore. The pavilion, with its 1,560-square-foot base, is open on all four sides. Circles and triangles may adorn the exterior, but the square was most important to Pricegore, who deemed the shape essential to maintaining the structure's relationship to the adjacent Soane-designed gallery. Soane used a strict orthogonal regime to conceive the gallery's plan. So, too, has Pricegore, although the firm has offset the pavilion 45 degrees to the gallery to create a more welcoming dialog to visitors, allowing the various colors of the louvers to gradually change upon approach. Gore continued: “The pavilion is accessible to everyone. A child can enjoy this as much as an art critic.” The Colour Palace is the result of a partnership between the Dulwich Picture Gallery and the London Festival of Architecture. The pavilion is open to the public until September 22, 2019.
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Color Palace by British designers Pricegore and Yinka Ilori wins the Dulwich Pavilion 2019 competition

Emerging British architecture office Pricegore and British artist Yinka Ilori were announced as winners of the annual Dulwich Pavilion for their design named Color Palace. The eye-catching and colorful pavilion will come to life next summer. The pavilion will feature a Nigerian-inspired artwork by Ilori, who is influenced by the African aesthetics of his childhood. The 2019 Pavilion will house “new ticketing facilities, a pop-up catering offer and a range of events over the summer,” according to a statement from Dulwich Picture Gallery. The project is co-hosted by the London Festival of Architecture, which is an annual event that celebrates London as a global design hub. The pavilion was chosen by a jury, along with a “combined public vote,” which garnered more than 2,000 votes from visitors on-site. Pricegore and Ilori's design won over other entries from young practices including Casswell Bank Architects, e10 Studio, Flea Folly Architects, Projects Office, and PUP Architects, which won the most public votes. The pavilion's screen is composed of slats painted with circular and triangular patterns in contrasting colors supported by massive, bright red columns on the corners. The space beneath is meant for informal gathering. Dulwich Pavilion is an annual competition that will be "at the heart of the gallery's bicentenary celebrations." Last year, the inaugural pavilion was won by IF_DO, a 2014-founded British practice.