Posts tagged with "Dublin":

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Airbnb opens an international HQ in Dublin (again)

Airbnb has officially opened its new headquarters in Dublin, located on Hanover Quay, in the "Silicon Docks" area of Ireland’s capital city. The 40,000-square-foot project, dubbed The Warehouse, will house more than 400 employees and emerges out of another collaboration with Dublin-based heneghan peng architects, the firm behind the company’s previous Dublin office (which will remain in operation). The new Dublin HQ’s three stories are designed around an atrium and amphitheater in the center of the building and features a grand central staircase, named the ‘Agora.’ The staircase can serve as a large conference or community event space for up to 400 people, or a lounge-style working environment for employees throughout the normal workday. The new Airbnb international headquarters inherits a rich history, having been home to Dublin Trawling Ice & Cold Storage since 1865, and the Raleigh Bicycle Company since 1954. When the bike manufacturer left in 1980, the warehouse was but a shell for a completely open floor plan, falling into disrepair after enduring not one, but two fires. Airbnb is said to have had direct architectural input in renovating the empty space, optimizing chances for “unplanned encounters that open avenues of creative exploration,” that “only the physical work space can activate,” according to Aaron Harvey, head of the environments team at Airbnb. “Our ambition has often been moderated by constraints of an existing structure that can’t be altered,” Harvey said.  “It was with the Dublin Warehouse that we finally had the opportunity to provoke the level of interaction and crosstalk that we’ve always imagined.” Each of the 29 primary working spaces, or ‘neighborhoods,’ come with its own large communal table instead of individual desks, shared storage space for employees, one or two sit stands, and a designated lounge spot, while secondary work spaces exist in kitchen areas or meeting spaces scattered throughout the warehouse, such as on the landings between floors. With more workstations than staff, the architects have designed enough space for everyone to sit where they like, according to News Four. Of course, in keeping with tradition, The Warehouse offers meeting rooms designed as replicas of the hottest listings on the Airbnb platform, drawing inspiration from destinations such as Mykonos, Lisbon, Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco in Mexico, and Montpellier in France. The Warehouse is also Airbnb’s first urban campus model, which is expected to become more prevalent in the company’s office spaces moving forward.
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Traffic-plagued Dublin institutes a ban on cars in downtown area to reduce city-center congestion

In another radical pushback on the congestion-creating, carbon-emitting automobile, the Dublin City Council and National Transport Authority have proposed to ban private cars from entire sections of the city's downtown core. The capital city of Ireland and prime economic hub ranks tenth globally in terms of traffic congestion, according to a study led by GPS maker TomTom. The proposed restrictions are part of a more than $165 million improvement plan for transit, cycling, and pedestrians, and a buffer against the city’s present incapacity to accommodate a projected 20 percent increase in commuters to the city center by 2023. In 2014, around 192,000 journeys into the city center took place each weekday during the peak morning period (7am-10am) alone, according to the Dublin City Centre Transport Study. By 2023, that number will spike by 42,000. In order to “ensure that Dublin develops into a more liveable city, where the impact of traffic is minimized,” say officials, changes will occur along major routes in the city center east of City Hall, west of Trinity College, north of St. Stephen’s Green and south of River Liffey. The area in front of the college will be converted into a civic space with a greatly expanded pedestrian footpath, while College Green and the north and south quays will be solely accessible by cyclists, pedestrians, and users of public transport. Meanwhile, Suffolk Street and St. Stephen’s Green North will be pedestrianized. To incentivize commuters to defect from private cars, the city is fortifying its public transportation networks, adding a Bus Rapid Transit System (BRT), upgrading the frequency and capacity of the DART, and running new rail passenger services between Kildare and the Grand Canal Dock area through Phoenix Park Tunnel. Meanwhile, D’Olier Street will be outfitted with a new central median with additional bus stops and segregated cycle lanes, while Westmoreland Street will have wider parks and enhanced cycling facilities. “The city can only continue to function effectively if we offer those living and working in Dublin, as well as visitors, more choices in how they access and move around the capital,” Owen Keegan, Dublin City Council chief executive, told The Journal. Given the 40,000-strong influx of new residents anticipated by the Central Statistics Office within 16 years, Dublin’s traffic reduction targets don’t have the luxury of hit-or-miss. At present, 48 percent of journeys into the city center are by public transport, 33 percent by private car, and walking and biking at 16 percent. The Dublin City Development has set a target of 55 percent for public transport, 20 percent by private car, 15 percent by bike, and 10 percent on foot.
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Gehry Gets Another Like: Architect Hired to Design Two International Facebook Offices

Facebook has chosen architect Frank Gehry to design the interiors of its relocated and expanded international offices in London and Dublin. This commission comes just a few weeks after Gehry was hired with Foster + Partners for the London Battersea Power Station redevelopment, his first project in the United Kingdom capital. The new Gehry-designed offices in the Irish and UK capital cities will provide current staff with double the square footage and allow for an increase in hired employees. Facebook London will move its headquarters to occupy three floors of 10 Brock Street. The Regent’s Place building gives Gehry 86,000 square feet of space for office design. This move will also situate the company in the same building as social media rival Twitter and only a short distance away from Google’s headquarters at King’s Cross. In Dublin, Facebook’s new digs will provide up to 1,000 employees with 114,000 square feet of office space in Grand Canal Square. Gehry began designing for the social media company last year when he was hired to create a new Menlo Park campus in California's Silicon Valley. More recently, he continued work for the brand in a redesign of engineering team offices in New York City's Astor Place.