Posts tagged with "drone footage":

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Cyprien Gaillard’s 3-D “Nightlife” offers mesmerizing look at cities and their histories of resistance

Marcel Duchamp Prize-winning artist Cyprien Gaillard’s film Nightlife (2015), currently on view for the first time in the United States at Gladstone Gallery in New York, is a portrait of the living city. Gaillard, who was born in Paris and lives and works between New York and Berlin, practices across media, including photo, film, and sculpture. He is known for his meditations on memory, history, and failure—including work on the legacy and present of modern architecture. His latest film, Nightlife, was filmed with advanced imaging techniques and drones, and the camera flows and glides between close-up, abstract shots to floating arial views with ease. Upon entering the gallery, a nautilus shell in a recessed light box mounted in a black wall marks the entrance to the screening area. Viewers are offered 3-D glasses, which enhance the hallucinatory, ecstatic nature of the piece. Though comprising seemingly abstract shots—swaying trees, fireworks, city streets, aerial views of buildings, all, of course, shot at night—the film is deeply allegorical, telling a complex history of revolution and resistance through objects, plants, and buildings that live and breathe as characters. Presented without caption or narration, the film advances in what might be described as four acts through Cleveland, Los Angeles, and Berlin, coming full circle in Cleveland again. The film opens on an almost indiscernible closeup of a plant before moving on to Rodin’s The Thinker, outside the Cleveland Museum of Art. The spinning camera revels in the sculpture’s apparent decay, the result of a 1970 bombing by the radical left-wing organization the Weather Underground. Nightlife then advances to Los Angeles, where it depicts dancing, rioting trees on the streets of the city—primarily the Hollywood Juniper, a non-native species that has been a recurring motif in Gaillard’s work. Shored up against the architectural forms, the trees not only trouble the boundaries of natural and artificial, but also evoke notions of indigeneity, migration, and belonging. The trees' movements might also be read more explicitly as a reference to the so-called L.A. riots of 1992 and to other forms of civil action and resistance. Though arguably all of Nightlife depicts the city as protagonist, the most explicitly architectural moment is the third act, which features the Berlin Olympiastadion. Built for the 1936 Olympics, the stadium served as a monument to the Third Reich. It now functions as a space for a variety of events, including an annual fireworks competition, the Pyronale, which is displayed in the film in explosive technicolor. The film returns to Cleveland, landing on American runner Jesse Owens's Olympic oak tree planted at the Ford Rhodes High School. Owens, whose four gold medal wins as a black athlete at the 1936 Olympics in Nazi Germany flew in the face the Third Reich’s extensive racist propaganda campaign, was awarded an oak sapling for each of his gold medals (the oak tree serves as a symbol of Germany). In lieu of the sound of its settings, the film loops a sample of Alton Ellis's Blackman's Word (1969) throughout, its repetition pulling the viewer into Nightlife’s self-contained world even more completely and unifying the disparate scenes. (Originally featuring the refrain “I was born a loser,” it was re-recorded in 1971 as “I was born a winner.” Critically, both versions feature in the film.) Not merely a vibrant portrait of cities at night, Nightlife traces the residue of history left on the landscape—be it "natural" or built. Nightlife originally appeared at Sprüth Magers in Berlin and is on view at Gladstone Gallery through April 14th. Cyprien Gaillard: Nightlife Gladstone Gallery, 530 West 21st Street,New York, NY Through April 14th
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Check out the new drone footage of Apple’s Campus 2 headquarters

Two new drone videos of Norman Foster's Apple headquarters have been released, giving an insight as to how construction is coming along. The footage from Matthew Roberts and Duncan Sinfield covers the goings-on at the soon-to-be 2,800,000-square-foot offices at "Apple Campus 2" in Cupertino, California. Flying over the site, you can see the huge circular shape that dominates the vicinity and has since become the campus's defining feature. Atop of the ellipse is an extensive array of solar paneling which, apparently, is roughly 65 percent complete. To speed up the construction process, wide atrium doors have been opened up fully to allow workers easy access to the site. Other elements of the program, though, cannot yet be so clearly seen. For example, a 1,000-seat auditorium is due to be constructed, as is an on-site power plant facility and fitness center. Though muddy now due to the rain Cupertino has been seeing of late, the center of the campus will feature a tree-filled garden for campus staff. The first trees, in fact, have just been planted. This is Roberts's eleventh update using drone footage. He has been tracking progress on the site monthly since March last year. Sinfield, however, has posted 19 videos dating back to June 2015. Apple Campus 2 employees are expected to move into the facility later this year. This article appears on HoverPin, a new app that lets you build personalized maps of geo-related online content based on your interests: architecture, food, culture, fitness, and more. Never miss The Architect's Newspaper's coverage of your area and discover new, exciting projects wherever you go! See our HoverPin layer here and download the app from the Apple Store.
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See this majestic aerial drone footage of Jordan’s breathtaking canyons, ruins, and architectural history

Travel and lifestyle brand Matador Network released breathtaking footage of an aerial fly-over by drone, offering a soaring bird’s-eye-view of Jordan’s architectural marvels. The drones freewheel between the canyons, whose goosebump-raising majesty dwarfs the buildings carved right into the sandstone cliffs. The Monastery in the lost city of Petra, one of Seven Wonders of the World, makes an appearance, the structure itself so gargantuan that the doorway alone is seven stories high. Shot by Scott Sporleder and Ross Borden with the latest high-tech DJI Inspire and DJI Phantom 2 drones, as well as a GoPro Hero 4, the footage then transports you to the Roman Colosseum–like South Theater in the Greco-Roman city of Gerasa, now known as Jerash, last inhabited 5,000 years ago. The inhabited cities of Jordan also appear as ruins from afar, their facades of a similar sandstone ilk to the ruins lost to the Western world after Christ.